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What just slammed the Sun?

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posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:39 AM
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Originally posted by JDARK11

Originally posted by xxnibiruxx
If you haven't already you should download all the .gif files from that military site, you will find some very interesting things if you look closely at the sun. (mainly the files toward the bottom of the page like this one that goes from April up to October)


Here's the link: INDEX

By the way, does anyone know what that winged object is to the left of the sun that appears to be moving really fast? (well its fast for the amount of time that is passing) which is found in the clip provided by the post above me
edit on 4-10-2011 by xxnibiruxx because: link


Wondering what the winged thing is too man, and your right, it is moving very fast for how quick the time is going and size in the clip. This has been in pics for a while, but is more vibrant than ever now





Sep19-Oct10 Mercury -1.5 Right to Left
sungrazer.nrl.navy.mil.../transits_2011




posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by dannotz
 


Yes, they do, but the thing is, the Sun is currently coming to a peak in its cycle and there was much activity from sun spots before this giant "object" (not known if the object is a comet), so the CME coming from the opposite side of the sun after this "object" hits could just be coincidental activity from sun spot 1302 or 1305 as those are the largest spots that everyone is keeping a close eye on. Me? I don't think it was a coincidence, the CME looks like a response to that impact.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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Originally posted by Quyll
I am amazed at the impact that the object had on our sun!

Does anyone know if or when the CME will hit us?

I'm actually a bit excited about this



Thats a terrible thing to get excited about.

As to the conspiratorial nature of the OP....

1. "Stuff" hits the sun all the time

2. That was a small comet or asteroid nothing special

3. Hits to the sun often produce distortions to the corona. that image was a composite of several cameras, one being designed to watch the sun's corona

4. Photons or light from the surface of the sun travel 93 million miles in 8 minutes to reach earth. This according to OP happened around 11:00p last night, if a CME had hit the planet--you wouldve known I assure you.

5. NASA isn't mandated in any way to tell you a damned thing. You can't make them, they couldnt tell you everything that happens in space if they wanted to. Do you really wanna live your life knowing all the dangers lurking past our atmosphere? Life planet-side is hard enough and full of its own danger. your average American ( I am from USA and cannot speak for the globe) wouldn't understand half the basics of astrophysics (obvious if you read the "ideas" brought forth in this thread) much less advanced principles that are only in their infancy among some of our greatest minds.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:50 AM
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The size of the 'glow' suggests this 'comet' was huge, yes it would get brighter as it approached the sun but if the comet was small how could it have a 'glow' that seemed from the images to be large enough to be the size of a large planet considering the size of it in relation to the sun?
I am not disputing what some are saying, I would just like to understand how something being described as small can look to have so much mass in the images just because it's glow increased as it approached the sun.

In my link I have scaled the Stereo image with a 2nd image showing the suns scale in relation to the planets (which I shrunk in size to closely match the size of the sun in the stereo image) and it suggests this comets 'glow/fireball' was bigger than most of the planets possibly even Jupiter at its widest point!!!



How can something small give off so much light that it appears to be as big as jupiter at its widest point?

I'm here to learn!!!



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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Everyone assumes the thing hits the sun and the explosion is seen appearing on the other side, but...

I made a little doodle showing what I think might have happened, seen from above, instead of the original POV. Could it be possible things happened as seen in the doodle?



The bottom of the image would be the place where the camera was, looking up at the sun from the drawing's point of view.

Also, could it be possible the thing, if a comet, was not made only of ice and snow but with a metallic core of some sorts, interacting with whatever forces that are emanating from the sun?

------

I admit I skipped a few pages to make my post so sorry if those questions were already addressed.


PS: Not shown in the drawing is that it could have hit the sun, not just the (XXXX)sphere around it, creating the explosion by ricochet, sort of...
edit on 4-10-2011 by NowanKenubi because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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Did the recent celestial impactor have a name? Or was it a random? If any can help with this answer thanks.

edit on 10/4/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by Pauligirl

Sep19-Oct10 Mercury -1.5 Right to Left


Now this "winged" celestial body is way too large to be Mercury, not to mention it is "winged" or "ringed" on top of that

edit on 4-10-2011 by xxnibiruxx because: grammar



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by FlyingSpaghettiMonster

Originally posted by centrifugal
NASA did pull the SOHO feed shortly after finding out about the comet.

Not sure why they pulled the feed, but if this was an attempt to cover up information they failed pretty bad.

It makes me wonder how NASA is supposedly hiding a dwarf star if they can't even hide a comet.

edit on 4-10-2011 by centrifugal because: (no reason given)


No they didn't 'pull the feed', they just updated the site to show the current state of the sun, as they always do. This was dealt with several pages ago. The time lapse of the comet hitting the sun is still there to be seen.


Actually they did pull the feed when they first discovered it and they also, when putting it back up, did so with the info missing between 0800 and 1300 (can't believe i'm having to repeat this again, especially for you who has been in the thread since the early posts)

What i have learned through the informational video posted by Human_Alien is that the CME didn't occur till 1.5 to 2.5 hours after the impact of the comet and it it's also at about 45 degrees to the left of where it would be even if this object could have caused it. Not only that Phage (yes, he has posted for those not bothering to read the thread) posted a video from Stereo of another, known, comet hitting the sun, it looked bigger than the one presented here but in truth was only a few km across and it's the brightness of these objects that give them their massive appearance. And another thing i have learned is that, if you look at where Stereo is, the CME is heading away from Earth.

You definitely learn from ATS


Enjoying the thread for the most part though, i wish people would pay attention though!



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by xxnibiruxx
 


They have a FAQ that will explain, and this one must have the top hit prize.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by Newbomb Turk
 


Was it the Venus eclipse?



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:32 AM
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Originally posted by MRiZZE
Hello guys.
I also discovered a big burst on 3rd October. Cannot say what caused it because of missing frames.
Whats your guess ?
www.youtube.com...

Greetz
MrIzze


It's likely nothing caused it, it was just a CME.

I have also learned why there is missing frames (i'm on a roll today)...


the 2 STEREO spacecraft are a long way away from us (over 100M miles). They need big dishes to maintain contact with ground stations so only a few round the world work (the deep space network) but if something else is going on (with say a planetary probe) then STEREO gets low priority. Which means either the data is lost or it is kept at the groundstation while the other contat is being dealt with.


So there we go, just to recap...



  • The comet was a normal comet, likely only a few km in diameter, looking massive due to brightness
  • The CME is at the wrong trajectory to have been caused by the comet
  • The CME occurs 1.5 to 2.5 hours after the comet slams the surface of the Sun
  • The CME is going the opposite direction from us
  • The missing frames are due to the low priority of the Stereo project


i think that's pretty much case closed...



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by 10thletter
 
IF,

It was "just a small comet" I'd hate to see what a big one would do! In any case the event has caused some head scratching at NASA and those concerned, and judging by the comments there, it seems that there is a consensus that one event caused the other, but nothing is written in stone as yet.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:53 AM
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reply to post by xxnibiruxx
 


Well yea, i think that would be a huge coincidence..

That was a huge CME also..



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:55 AM
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wow that was huge! maybe the reaction the sun gave off made the object seem bigger... i dont know



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:57 AM
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Found this from the OP youtube link:

SOHO Vid

Looks like this happens a lot. In December of 96 watch from 22:36 23rd - 05:20 24th. You can see a comet hit the sun and a CME.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:57 AM
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Originally posted by Human_Alien

Headed our way?! Has a CME that large ever 'headed our way' in recorded history before?


No but we are at the end of a 27,000 year cycle, so who knows the answer really



Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by xxnibiruxx
 


They have a FAQ that will explain, and this one must have the top hit prize.


Ofcourse I'm going to look at NASA's answers to Frequently Asked Questions
. I took a look and it seems that some answers are very accurate and others may also seem very believable, you can't always disagree with NASA, but you can't always agree they are telling the truth about flying saucer-shaped objects either

edit on 4-10-2011 by xxnibiruxx because: additional quote



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by smurfy
reply to post by 10thletter
 
IF,

It was "just a small comet" I'd hate to see what a big one would do! In any case the event has caused some head scratching at NASA and those concerned, and judging by the comments there, it seems that there is a consensus that one event caused the other, but nothing is written in stone as yet.


Meet Comet Machholz (thanks Phage)



Now take another look at Sol's recent "attacker"...



Now, Machholz (the Comet, not the man) is only a few km across, what does that tell you?

Now, watch this...




posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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Originally posted by FlyingSpaghettiMonster
reply to post by CrikeyMagnet
 


The light coming from the sun tells us what's inside it. For a precis of how, watch 'Wonders of the Solar System' presented by Prof Brian Cox, but basically the frequencies of light have been analysed and tells us that like every other star that ever existed, they are the source of every element on every planet, including Earth. And consequently, the source of every atom in everything that ever lived or will live. The different stages of supernova create different elements and release them into the universe.


Okay. We can see the radiation emitted by a body and make an educated guess as to its composition, but we really don't have a more inspectable sample to work with than the giant ball we can't get anywhere near. We can speculate on the composition of the whole, but until we get a sample of the core of the sun, we cannot definitively say what comprises it.

Wouldn't a solid core explain the transfer of momentum upon impact? What ho, solid-core sun?



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 09:09 AM
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*facepalm*

2nd




posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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The video is speeded up x720 times. one frame~29 seconds.
So the actual time between the impact and the flare was atleast 2 hours 24 minutes.







 
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