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BUSTED Easy Jet Airlines Caught Aersol Spraying in Europe.

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posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 01:37 PM
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Those are some real big chemtrailsin the picture, i dont believe ice crystals an stay in the air for that long, let alone in the same formation that they were left from the engine.




posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


Well if people don't think it's off topic, then OK.

You wouldn't have to fly up right behind a plane to get a sample from it's contrail, or "chemtrail". You would merely have to fly though its contrail...how hard is that to understand?

Or are you saying that the chemicals which comprise the "chemtrail" immediately fall out of solution upon exiting the engine so you would have to be RIGHT behind it in order to obtain a sample? Explain...



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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Originally posted by EarthCitizen07
The debunking piece you provided talks a lot about aluminum but not much about barium and strontium. On a side note isn't barium one of the heavy elements used in oil drilling to stop blowouts? I remember this from the BP disaster last year.


It talks about Aluminum so much because that's the main focus of the film. There's lots of debunking of the various barium claims elsewhere on the site, like this classic:

contrailscience.com...

Drilling muds and cements for oil well is just one of many uses of barium.
www.atsdr.cdc.gov...

Barium compounds are used by the oil and gas industries to make drilling muds. Drilling muds make it easier to drill through rock by keeping the drill bit lubricated. They are also used to make paint, bricks, ceramics, glass, and rubber.

Barium sulfate is sometimes used by doctors to perform medical tests and to take x-rays of the gastrointestinal tract.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


There are instances when dumping fuel from only one wings take can be relevant.
It would take a lot of explanation to get you to understand multi-engine aerodynamics, especially with an engine out. And I don't feel like giving you a free hour of ground-school, so...
I don't know what you saw and since you don't have pictures I can only speculate. But it there are instances when dumping fuel from one dump is not out of the ordinary.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by ktmadhouse
Those are some real big chemtrailsin the picture, i dont believe ice crystals an stay in the air for that long, let alone in the same formation that they were left from the engine.


They are very tiny ice crystals, like a super fine dust.

Remember, cirrus clouds are made of ice crystals, they stay up there plenty long enough.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 


So tell me this. Hw does the "chemtrail" streaming out behind the airplane then contaminate the air inside? The cabin is pressurized and fully contained as far as I know, nothing can get in from outside. This is utter nonsense. Give me one good reason that any govt would do this just one sensible reason that someone like me can believe.
Oh, please keep in mind that I am not one of those people who thinks the govt is out to get me, or reduce the worlds population or control my mind. Call me crazy but I just dont believe those things.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 02:46 PM
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Just in reply to the OP. as I could not be bothered to read so many pages of complete nonsense

1, Easy jet do not have any A380 aircraft in their fleet. It is just some marketeers dream shot.

2. "toxic" air is under discussion due to reports of ill health caused by fumes inside the cabin. why should this happen you may ask. Well I will tell you. it's called the bleed air system.

Super cool air is bled and from the engines or APU and fed into the air conditioning system when it is them pumped into and out of the cabin. this also forms part of the pressurization system. i.e. more air is pumped in than is let out in order to increase the pressure inside the cabin to survivable levels usually 8000ft pressure alt.

The fumes come from older model aircraft mainly. namely the 757. and BAE-146 where perished seals in the bleed air system allows fuel and oil particular from the heat exchangers, into the air system. You only require a small ppm figure to suddenly start smelling fuel.

When this level reaches dangerous level due to more oil or fuel particulate into the air system. This is when it is classified a fume event. Which is a reportable (MOR) incident by ICAO and authority ruling. It can also mean the aircraft will return to base, or divert to nearest, due to the health risk to crew and passengers.

This has nothing to do with "aerosol" spraying in or outside the cabin.

Seeing as Easyjet operarte A319 / A320 aircraft as well as 737, any introduction in the aircraft of a chemical storage and dispersal system would require extreme heavy modification to the type design of the aircraft. Which would be required to be installed by a specially approved supplemental type certificate modification.

Don't believe me?

go to www.easa.europa.eu search for STC. and bring up the list of currently approved STC's and do a search in that for whatever you want.

I guarantee you will not find any such system approved in commercial air transport for the A320 or 737. Nothing major gets onto an aircraft with out the system being testing and approved.

try the same for the FAA (www.faa.gov) youll get the same results.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 02:56 PM
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fossil fuel derivative + O2 + ignition = co2 and water vapour .
now pump that warm water vapour out into a cooler enviroment and you get plumeing. have none of you ever seen a condenseing boiler in operation or an exhaust pipe on a car.
another point where on earth would you keep enough pressurised gas to pump out over, for arguements sake a 4 hour flight on a modern airliner without someone seeing ? how would the gas be loaded when the aircraft are in plane view all the time. Would the aviation authoritys not have something to say about huge pressurised containers hidden on aircraft. With all the technicians, flight engineers etc dont you think a lot more people would have blown the whistle by now!
Stelios' company may have been involved in an oil spill, but that was due to an unfortunate incident in a hazardous occupation, not unheard of the industry.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by karen61057
reply to post by Human_Alien
 


So tell me this. Hw does the "chemtrail" streaming out behind the airplane then contaminate the air inside? The cabin is pressurized and fully contained as far as I know, nothing can get in from outside.


"Bleed air" is drawn from the compressor portion of the engine, so it's coming from outside. That's then used to pressurize the cabin, and circulate the air. See:

en.wikipedia.org...



So you could, in theory, just sample the air during a regular flight to see if there's anything odd in the atmosphere.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by loves a conspiricy
I love reading threads like this....makes me laugh


You get someone who works/worked in the field debunking everything you say...but you chose to ignore it because you saw a youtube video or read a kids blog. I trust the mods accounts


I commented on a thread like this not to long ago...if they add aluminum and other crap to the fuel...the engines would not work...they would be destroyed within minutes of them starting.

Its all explainable...many are just to ignorant to look for the real answers, and chose to make something out of nothing.


Your condescending tone is inappropriate and you fail to acknowledge(or understand) all kinds of additives can be added to the fuel mixture with or without it affecting the engines. For example in cars LEADED gasoline was common for decades because it coated the valves and gave mass to the gasoline(thus more horsepower).

Today they sell additives to the oil and gasoline supply for your car and they work pretty good. In other words they act as detergents and clean the engine.

Similiary I speculate you could add a respectable amount of barium and strontium to jetfuel and if you can't then the combusion process would produce trace amounts at flight level. Why do you think its called POLLUTION?

Try patronising someone who is clueless.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by Human_Alien








I have seen assertions that this is a genuine photo. Erm, it's an A380, in EasyJet colours. An A380.........if we can't get something as basic as that right, why would we listen to any convoluted and unproveable theories that are tied to it?



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:14 PM
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reply to post by Human_Alien
 


It's all part of a conspiracy to induce global warming scam not mitigate it so to help force the carbon credit scheme engineered by Al Gore and his big money backers to hijack the world economy and enslave everyone.

This may not be the truth, but man caused climate change IS A LIE!

We need to use a lot more oil, more fossil fuels in general, to promote higher standards of livings for everyone.

The problem is fossil fuel energy profits made through the private sector help to concentrate wealth at the top. To correct this most dysfunctional socioeconomic dynamic all nations need to nationalize their energy sectors and banking systems then distribute the wealth derived from a nationalized system equitably to all the people.

That video distracts from the real issues of the day. The main issue of the day is to pull people out of poverty and grow the middle class while severely limiting greedy narcissistic people from concentrating wealth. There is no logical or moral reason to allow the ability for people to become super rich, it is the leading cause of poverty and death rates among the poor.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by da pickles
fossil fuel derivative + O2 + ignition = co2 and water vapour .
now pump that warm water vapour out into a cooler enviroment and you get plumeing. have none of you ever seen a condenseing boiler in operation or an exhaust pipe on a car.
another point where on earth would you keep enough pressurised gas to pump out over, for arguements sake a 4 hour flight on a modern airliner without someone seeing ? how would the gas be loaded when the aircraft are in plane view all the time. Would the aviation authoritys not have something to say about huge pressurised containers hidden on aircraft. With all the technicians, flight engineers etc dont you think a lot more people would have blown the whistle by now!
Stelios' company may have been involved in an oil spill, but that was due to an unfortunate incident in a hazardous occupation, not unheard of the industry.


What about carbon monoxide?

Remember airplanes don't have catalytic converters on turbo fan engines? Fuel is sprayed after air is "pumped" by the fans into the combusion chamber which causes thrust. Thrust expells all kinds of gases rellated to the make-up of the fuel.

Particles of CO2 and H20 is only part of the story!



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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i cannot believe this dribble, if anyone of you ops had an idea on anything aero you would know that this is normal exhaust from a high bypass turbo fan, the inner part of the stream is the condensed exhaust, the hotter air is denser so its a thicker white and the cooler air that comes through the large fan that flows down the internal of the engine. bypassing the engine is cooler so creates the wispy exhaust around the denser exhaust.

Wee Mad



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by weemadmental
 


Only if the turbo-fan was running purely on hydrogen fuel.

Obviously you DON'T know what you are talking about!



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by EarthCitizen07

What about carbon monoxide?

Remember airplanes don't have catalytic converters on turbo fan engines? Fuel is sprayed after air is "pumped" by the fans into the combusion chamber which causes thrust. Thrust expells all kinds of gases rellated to the make-up of the fuel.

Particles of CO2 and H20 is only part of the story!


It's about 99% of the story. Engines actually produce more water by volume (13 H20) than they burn fuel (C12H26). Sure there's pollution, but I don't think that's what the OP was going on about.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by Uncinus

Originally posted by EarthCitizen07

What about carbon monoxide?

Remember airplanes don't have catalytic converters on turbo fan engines? Fuel is sprayed after air is "pumped" by the fans into the combusion chamber which causes thrust. Thrust expells all kinds of gases rellated to the make-up of the fuel.

Particles of CO2 and H20 is only part of the story!


It's about 99% of the story. Engines actually produce more water by volume (13 H20) than they burn fuel (C12H26). Sure there's pollution, but I don't think that's what the OP was going on about.


So turbo fan engines cause lots of water vapor but not gasoline or diesel engines? Why so? Is it the composition of the jet fuel or something else?

I am not sure exactly what the OP was trying to convey. If aresols are stored seperately in tanks, mixed with the fuel during the refinning process or simply added later as an additive. Either way it is still pollution as far as I am concerned because toxic elements are being injected into our atmosphere which cause a variety of health and weather problems.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by EarthCitizen07

What about carbon monoxide?


CO is a product of inefficient combustion - if there is enough oxygen all the carbon combines to make CO2.

Jet engine makers spend a great deal of money trying to squeeze every miniscule % of efficiency they can from their engines so I'd expect there to be less CO in jet exhaust then in, say, your average car exhaust.

I got this basic summary of exhaust products from a Swiss Air site:


edit on 3-10-2011 by Aloysius the Gaul because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by EarthCitizen07
[
So turbo fan engines cause lots of water vapor but not gasoline or diesel engines? Why so? Is it the composition of the jet fuel or something else?


Gas and diesel engines crtainly make a lot of water vapour too - that's the white "smoke" that comes out the back of your car on a cold morning.

But usually these engines are operating at low altitude and moderate temperatures - so it doesn't last long if it lasts at all.

In this video of ground level contrails at the South Pole yuo can see a contrail coming from a truck in the foreground when it is in shot - as well as the C130 engines - the difference in volume is quite staggering!!




posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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The picture is definitely fake, as EasyJet does not operate Airbus A380 (which is the aircraft in the picture).




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