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Pushing Vaccines

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posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 11:02 PM
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I missed this one: September 28, 2011 was World Rabies Day.

Rabies is a fatal disease caused by one of the many rabies viruses - and one of the rapidly increasing number of diseases that spread from animals to people.

Human deaths from rabies went up 40% between 1997 and 2011 - from 35-50,000 in 1997 to 50-70,000 in 2011 - mostly in developing nations. By comparison, the world's population increased from 5.84 billion to 7 billion in the same period, a 20% increase.

People are in a panic from Detroit to India and the Phillipines.

Despite evidence indicating viruses and bacteria play an essential role in maintaining life's balance on the planet - and that "disease" is a necessary part of evolutionary transitions - Big Pharma wants to eradicate yet another lifeform: the lowly rabies virus. For profit, of course.

Any animal can get rabies, but those that hang out in populated areas are of the greatest concern - like bats, squirrels and raccoons.

However, dogs can get rabies too, so the World Society for the Protection of Animals is working with Big Pharma to promote mass vaccination of dogs in countries where rabies is endemic.

In addition, developing nations are being urged to implement educational programs, mandate animal vaccination - and stock up on human rabies vaccines.



Rabies is an acute, fatal viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal resulting in impacts to public health, agriculture, and wildlife. Rabies costs governments and the people of North America hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

…..Despite implementation of aggressive rabies management strategies in many countries, rabies still results in 50,000 to 70,000 human deaths mostly in developing countries around the world.



…..Six people have died of rabies in Shanghai so far this year. Two thousand humans die of rabies every year in Bangladesh; twenty thousand die annually in India. ……

Traditionally, governments have attempted to control rabies by kneejerk reactions in the face of outbreaks, sending out death squads to shoot or poison all dogs in an area. Around twenty million dogs are killed every year in this way, yet still, rabies continues to thrive.

The World Society for the Protection of Animals is promoting an alternative global approach: mass vaccination of dogs in countries where rabies is endemic.



The World Health Organization (WHO) World Survey of Rabies for the year 1997 gave an estimate of between 35,000 and 50,000 annually.


About Rabies [pdf]


DETROIT - Rabies 2011
Please help us spread the word about the upcoming seminar in Detroit. We are recruiting a team of experts to help us put up posters throughout the city to warn the citizens of the impending disaster and potential hazard posed to them and their safety. Please contact GSHCUSA Booking for more information about how you can help. We will be compensating the street team with attire and free admission to the event.


My personal favorite, (translations welcome):

DETROIT - Rabies 2011
In recent years, Detroit has been overrun by mass amounts of grey squirrels, black squirrels, & the elusive brown variety. With mass migration of these animals, comes the risk of rabies outbreak.

Well folks, the worst has happened and the plane has crashed into the mountain.

In the past year, we have seen a 67% increase of 33% of all rabies victims. Half of those victims are a close 21% of almost a quarter of Detroit’s population.


At the request of the Mayor, the 2011 Rabid Animal Blockade Institution Expo Seminar will be held in the city of Detroit this year. We’ve arranged with the CDC to have a special GREEN ZONE PERMIT and will be 97.5% sure that absolutely zero squirrels will be in at least three quarters of the park’s vicinity.

Sunday, July 31, carefully leave your house, and come directly to the refuge of Detroit’s New Center Park. We will be having live safety demonstrations, squirrel repellent and corn dog vendors, and a special surprise celebrity appearance to be announced.



World Rabies Day is September 28, 2011

Rabies Still A Threat
People and animals are infected by the rabies virus and die from rabies each year.

From the CDC Rabies Info site:

"Each year around the world, rabies results in more than 55,000 deaths - approximately one death every 10 minutes. Most deaths are reported from Africa and Asia with almost 50% of the victims being children under the age of 15."

…Rabies may be spread between animals and humans, wildlife and pets.

What You Can Do
The first step is to vaccinate your pets. Rabies is a preventable disease, but 100% fatal in unvaccinated animals. Visit the World Rabies Day site for more ways to be involved in promoting rabies awareness and eradication.



Eliminating man’s deadliest, yet preventable disease

Did you know that rabies kills more people each year than severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the bird flu (H5N1) and the dengue fever combined?

… “Yes, there are vaccines that could be given to both humans and dogs to prevent the risk of virus infection (they create an immune response against the rabies virus), but unfortunately, rabies is still on the rise in certain parts of the world,” reported Dr. Raffy Deray, program manager of the National Rabies Prevention Control Program.

… “Here in the Philippines, while the number may have fallen from the previous rates wherein deaths would range from 300 to 600 each year, as doctors we still don’t want deaths (around 80 have already been reported to the health department) considering there are inexpensive and easy ways to prevent it,” Deray said.
This was the reason Republic Act 9482 was enacted. Known as The Anti-Rabies Act of 2007, the law mandates both public and private sectors to avail of dog immunization, preexposure treatment of high-risk personnel and postexposure treatment of animal bite victims, free routine immunization of schoolchildren aged five to 14 in areas where there is high incidence of rabies and encouragement of responsible pet ownership.

With the ultimate goal of being declared as rabies-free by the year 2020, …



70,000 people die of rabies annually

AS many as 70,000 people die annually from rabies at a cost of $ four billion. Rabies is a killer disease which is being caused by 90 percent dog bite around the globe but it can be prevented through proper vaccination.

…According to the Global Alliance for Rabies Control (GARC) report, it has also been confirmed that rabies is one of the most lethal zoonotic or animal-transmitted




posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 08:03 AM
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Small nit-picky comment: a virus is not a living organism, it is an obligate parasite.

As a matter of idle curiosity, I am also wondering where you get the idea that the rabies virus is a good thing? References would be wonderful, if you have them. Not being obtuse, I am actually interested to read them if you have them.



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Ha ha! The bit about the plane crashing into the mountain and the "squirrel-free perimeter" is priceless!

Definite vaccine push which isn't a surprise given the industry's momentum.

S+F from me


hypervalentiodine wrote:


Small nit-picky comment: a virus is not a living organism, it is an obligate parasite.


It's funny distinctions like this are made. To me, the fact that a virus requires a host as sustenance doesn't preclude it from being a living organism. I guess it makes it easier from a moral/ethical standpoint when discussing eradication.
edit on 4-10-2011 by StrangeBrew because: spelling



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:01 AM
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Your information is not correct.

Rabies is still a huge issue in developing countries such as India, where there are about 100k exposures each year.
Due to programs in the states, the animal human rabie exposure is much lower. In the United States there are less then 10 deaths each year due to rabies.
Plenty of animals have rabies, but due to vaccination programs, they are kept in the woods and out of the house.

Bats actually have very low incidents of rabies, that is a myth that won't die.
The highest incidents are among predatory animals like foxes and their prey who managed to get away like cats, groundhogs,raccoons, etc.

Once the symptoms of rabies show up, it is 100% fatal, and the symptoms are nasty.

Anyone on here advocating allowing rabies to run rampant are just downright disturbed.

Since it is such a wonderful organism to you, why don't you go out and do us all a favor and get exposed.

edit on 4-10-2011 by nixie_nox because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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Just for the record, only one person in history has ever survived rabies. It was a teenage girl whome a doctor put into a coma and pumped her full of anti-virals for several days. The process has not been able to be duplicated again.

Not only is rabies 100% fatal after a brutal sickness, it can take up to a year for symptoms to show, making it hard to track in some cases. Hence the reasons for vaccination in the case of concern.

Vaccination is absolutely necessary. The disease will still exist in the wild kingdom, just not domestic animals and humans if it can be helped.

Since you are so sympathetic, lets look at some of the symptoms in humans:
Fever.
Cough or sore throat.
Pain, burning, itching, tingling, or numbness at the site of the bite or original exposure.
Abdominal pain.
Anxiety or restlessness that gradually gets worse and may become extreme agitation.
Later symptoms are more distinctive and may include:

Periods of normal behavior that alternate with bizarre or unusual behavior, such as:
Anxiety or feeling agitated.
Hallucinations.
Delirium.
Fear of water (hydrophobia) or fear of air (aerophobia).
Muscle spasms in the face, neck, and/or diaphragm, followed by seizures.
Paralysis, which is often the only symptom of the less common paralytic form of rabies often associated with rabies from vampire bats.
Wide fluctuations in temperature, pulse, and blood pressure.
Coma, and heart and respiratory failure.


webmd
edit on 4-10-2011 by nixie_nox because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 07:07 PM
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Originally posted by StrangeBrew

It's funny distinctions like this are made. To me, the fact that a virus requires a host as sustenance doesn't preclude it from being a living organism. I guess it makes it easier from a moral/ethical standpoint when discussing eradication.


It's not that it makes it easier from an ethical point of view, it's simply that we need to make a distinction of what is alive and what is not. A virus is completely dependent on host mechanisms to reproduce and cannot function without it and is therefore defined as not being alive. Simple as that. There is of course a great deal of debate on the issue, but all in all I agree with the distinction and I don't see it changing.

Furthermore, whether it is considered alive or not would really have no baring on whether it would be up for eradication. I can think of a number of pests here in Australia and New-Zealand that are trying being killed off as they are harmful either to the natural flora and fauna or to the farming industry and are additionally not a natural part of the surroundings. A good example would be rabbits or cane toads in QLD or feral cats and foxes in NZ. There is nothing good that I can see about the rabies virus. It is of no benefit to any part of any ecosystem anywhere and does nothing but kill the organisms it invades. Living or not, I don't see a problem with getting rid of something like that.

edit on 4-10-2011 by hypervalentiodine because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 



a virus is not a living organism, it is an obligate parasite.


And how do you define prions aka infectious misfolded proteins, pray tell?



As a matter of idle curiosity, I am also wondering where you get the idea that the rabies virus is a good thing?


Viruses, bacteria - and prions - are part of the circle of life. When you muck with any part of that circle, you bugger the system.



References would be wonderful, if you have them. Not being obtuse, I am actually interested to read them if you have them.


Sorry, you're on your own. ...Maybe start by searching cutting-edge evolution theories and hypotheses.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 05:45 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
People are in a panic from Detroit to India and the Phillipines.

Having recently been in one of these places for an extended time, I can confirm that there is no panic, nor even any general awareness of a rabies epidemic. Vets and wildlife managers are probably aware of the rabies incidence, but I haven't seen any of them panicking in a public manner. Perhaps they panic in private?


Despite evidence indicating viruses and bacteria play an essential role in maintaining life's balance on the planet - and that "disease" is a necessary part of evolutionary transitions

So are mass extinctions. Feel free to extinguish yourself in the name of evolutionary transition. I prefer to be alive. And I'm willing to step on a few non-living proteins to do it.


- Big Pharma wants to eradicate yet another lifeform: the lowly rabies virus. For profit, of course.

Viruses aren't alive, and if anyone can eliminate rabies, may they receive enough profits to make Scrooge McDuck envious. You can hold a funeral and bury virions in tiny little coffins if you want, I'll be throwing a party.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 




.....why don't you go out and do us all a favor and get exposed.



Aww. Nasty.

Besides - I was just fishin' for rabid defenders-of-the-corporate-faith bottom feeders.

edit on 6/10/11 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 07:59 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow


And how do you define prions aka infectious misfolded proteins, pray tell?



Certainly not as a living organism, if that's where you're going. They fail another key component of the whole 'being alive' thing, which is that they don't have DNA or any kind of nucleic acid.



Viruses, bacteria - and prions - are part of the circle of life. When you muck with any part of that circle, you bugger the system.



Sure, I'll agree with that.




Sorry, you're on your own. ...Maybe start by searching cutting-edge evolution theories and hypotheses.



You see, since you're the one making the silly claims, the onus is on you to back them up (not me). I mean, surely to have made such a claim you would have to of read at least one scientific article that can back you up - where else could you have gotten the idea from?
edit on 6-10-2011 by hypervalentiodine because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 



where else could you have gotten the idea from?


Some of us *gasp* dare to think.

Some of us even dare to say outright what others merely imply.

Radical, I know.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 



where else could you have gotten the idea from?


Some of us *gasp* dare to think.

Some of us even dare to say outright what others merely imply.

Radical, I know.






Hey, I'm all for thinking, but your quote was this:



Despite evidence indicating viruses and bacteria play an essential role in maintaining life's balance on the planet - and that "disease" is a necessary part of evolutionary transitions - Big Pharma wants to eradicate yet another lifeform: the lowly rabies virus. For profit, of course.


Emphasis is mine.

So where's the evidence, hmm? Obviously bacteria can have good and bad affects and are completely necessary for life, but this quote directly implies that you think the rabies virus is good. How do you come to that conclusion?
edit on 6-10-2011 by hypervalentiodine because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 09:18 PM
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Kinda on topic,.
our cat recieved mail a few weeks ago telling her she needed shots and rabies was one of them,.
I looked at the card and said no. Our cat never sees the outside world so no worry for rabies,.
I argued this with the wife for the next week about my decision. and finally got some support
from a vet tech ( my sons G-friend) whom said this is a computer generated mail and unless the cat
is a bitter to peoples of the house OR is an outside cat,.. the shots are very over rated and unneeded.
Well, naturally I like to be correct and enjoyed the moment. and won the cats freedom from the
chemical poisioning.
I have heard of animal vaccines causing severe changes in personality and sometimes heart attacks.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 09:55 PM
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reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 



Hey, I'm all for thinking,


Good. Here's some stuff to think about…


A supraorganism is an individual organism that contains many independent and interdependent organisms that form a biological interaction network in and out of its body.

For example, a human being is a supraorganism that contains bacteria, virus, fungi, and animals in his/her skin and internal organs.


Given that we, as supraorganisms, are made of cooperating bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microbes, then we might want to rethink our view of our relationships. And not make any rash assumptions that one or the other virus has no redeeming qualities in the larger scheme of things.

All in all, the virus-like components of the human genome amount to almost half of our DNA.



I, virus: Why you're only half human

WHEN, in 2001, the human genome was sequenced for the first time, we were confronted by several surprises. One was the sheer lack of genes: where we had anticipated perhaps 100,000 there were actually as few as 20,000. A bigger surprise came from analysis of the genetic sequences, which revealed that these genes made up a mere 1.5 per cent of the genome. This is dwarfed by DNA deriving from viruses, which amounts to roughly 9 per cent.

On top of that, huge chunks of the genome are made up of mysterious virus-like entities called retrotransposons, pieces of selfish DNA that appear to serve no function other than to make copies of themselves. These account for no less than 34 per cent of our genome.

All in all, the virus-like components of the human genome amount to almost half of our DNA.




…(your statement) directly implies that you think the rabies virus is good. How do you come to that conclusion?


Erm no. Just that we can't assume it's bad - or that we can guess what role it may play in the larger scheme of things. Perhaps our exposure to the rabies virus is important to our survival as a species. ...It's not unthinkable.



posted on Oct, 6 2011 @ 10:34 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow


Erm no. Just that we can't assume it's bad - or that we can guess what role it may play in the larger scheme of things. Perhaps our exposure to the rabies virus is important to our survival as a species. ...It's not unthinkable.





Except that 99.9% of people do not survive a rabies infection. I fail to see how this is at all beneficial as it in no way selects for survival of the fittest, since no one ever survives it (except the one case that nixie kindly provided for us).



posted on Oct, 7 2011 @ 08:28 AM
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reply to post by hypervalentiodine
 


Originally posted by hypervalentiodine

Originally posted by soficrow


Erm no. Just that we can't assume it's bad - or that we can guess what role it may play in the larger scheme of things. Perhaps our exposure to the rabies virus is important to our survival as a species. ...It's not unthinkable.





Except that 99.9% of people do not survive a rabies infection.



Your statement is not accurate. The evidence shows that 99.9% of people who develop symptoms do not survive. ....Despite the fact that rabies is endemic in many heavily populated parts of the world, only 0.01% of the human population develop symptoms - suggesting that many many more are infected who do NOT develop symptoms. Most likely, the people who are infected but do not develop symptoms receive benefits from the immunity - and confer those benefits to the rest of humanity via some unknown pathway.



I fail to see how this is at all beneficial as it in no way selects for survival of the fittest,


Are you sure you understand what "survival of the fittest" really means?


If you are in the ocean, "Best" will be completely different than on land.

If you are in the arctic, "best" will be compltely different than in the desert at the equator.

Additionally, if you've just had a meteor impact, "best" is completely different than a normal year.

"Survival of the fittest" is actually a complete misnomer, since a superior species on one continent or island can be irradicated by a disaster due to proximity, while an inferior species with a similar niche might survive on another continent or island.



"Genomes of the Fittest" Do Not Always Win in New Theory of Evolution

A joint study between the Universities of Exeter and Bath in the UK, with a group from San Diego State University in the US, challenges our current understanding of evolution by showing that biodiversity may evolve where previously thought impossible.

The work represents a new approach to studying evolution that may eventually lead to a better understanding of the diversity of bacteria that cause human diseases.



Natural selection may not produce the best organisms

Genetic mutations create the raw material that natural selection acts upon. The short-term fate of a mutation is often quite clear. Mutations that make organisms more fit tend to persist through generations, while harmful mutations tend to die off with the organisms that possess them. The long-term consequences of mutations, however, are not well understood by evolutionary biologists. The researchers have shown that what may be good in the short run, may hinder evolution in the long run.

....."Some traits are easy to evolve – formed by many different combinations of mutations. Others are hard to evolve – made from an unlikely genetic recipe. Evolution gives us the easy ones, even when they are not the best."

The group's analysis of RNA molecules from a wide variety of species suggests that life is indeed dominated by the "easy" traits, perhaps at the expense of the best ones.




since no one ever survives it (except the one case that nixie kindly provided for us).


No one survives after symptoms appear - but we have no idea how many are infected, do NOT develop symptoms - and survive the infection.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 12:50 AM
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It really amazes me what the luxury of living in a first world nation does to a person's perspective on health care. Of course those of us in western society see rabies as "not a big deal". I mean, why would we mandate vaccination of our pets for something that "isn't a big deal"?

Of course, if you talk to people in communities hit very hard by this disease, especially in India and southeast Asia, I'm sure you'll be told it's actually quite a very "big deal", one they would gladly be rid of.

But, you know, go back to your comfy living room and play "armchair health policy specialist". Personally, I'm just content in the fact that 99% of people on this board will never have any impact on worldwide vaccine and health initiatives.



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 



It really amazes me what the luxury of living in a first world nation does to a person's perspective on health care.
...go back to your comfy living room and play "armchair health policy specialist". Personally, I'm just content in the fact that 99% of people on this board will never have any impact on worldwide vaccine and health initiatives.


Recent research shows that individuals who "deal with" the flu naturally strengthen their immune systems and develop broad-based immunities. People who are vaccinated do not enjoy any such benefits.

In addition to vaccines, the "first world" has exported a Chronic Disease Pandemic to the developing nations - all diseases that used to be considered "diseases of civilization." There's more to the story, scientifically as well as economically and socially.

Why don't you check out this thread, and comment there?

AIDS, Alzheimer's, Cancer - and Mad Cow Prions. What's the Story?



posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 12:09 AM
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Recent research shows that individuals who "deal with" the flu


I thought we were talking about rabies, a virus which has an alarming rate of mortality compared to the flu?

Why are you using a strawman instead of trying to prove your original point?


People who are vaccinated do not enjoy any such benefits.


Not true. Your immune system reacts to a vaccine in the same way it reacts to a live pathogen. The vaccine simply takes the risk of infection out of the picture, should your immune system fail to respond strongly enough.


In addition to vaccines, the "first world" has exported a Chronic Disease Pandemic to the developing nations - all diseases that used to be considered "diseases of civilization."


Maternal death during labor used to be a "condition of civilization", also. There was a time when nearly half of women would die in childbirth, or due to infection shortly after.

Are you suggesting we stop providing antibiotics and intrapartum care to women and let them go back to dying off?


Why don't you check out this thread, and comment there?

AIDS, Alzheimer's, Cancer - and Mad Cow Prions. What's the Story?


I was going to read that thread, but stopped at the first sentence, as it is factually incorrect. Prions are not the cause of cancer, not are they the root cause of AIDS, Alzheimer's, diabetes, ALS, or obesity. Your first few sentences in that thread demonstrate a staggeringly poor understanding of basic medical science, and thus that thread doesn't really warrant a reply.








posted on Oct, 9 2011 @ 01:19 AM
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reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 


FYI, soficrow was implicitly quoting this peer reviewed recent paper as evidence for flu vaccination issue. I've read many of her previous posts.

Annual vaccination against influenza hampers development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell immunity in children
JVI Accepts, published online ahead of print on 31 August 2011
J. Virol. doi:10.1128/JVI.05213-11


jvi.asm.org/cgi/content/short/JVI.05213-11v1



ABSTRACT

Infection with seasonal influenza A viruses induces immunity to potentially pandemic influenza A viruses of other subtypes (heterosubtypic immunity). We recently demonstrated that vaccination against seasonal influenza prevented the induction of heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A/H5N1 induced by infection with seasonal influenza in animal models, which correlated with the absence of virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Annual vaccination of all healthy children against influenza has been recommended, but the impact of vaccination on the development of the virus-specific CD8+ T cell immunity in children is currently unknown. Here we compared the virus-specific CD8+ T cell immunity in children vaccinated annually with that in unvaccinated children. In the present study, we compared influenza A virus-specific cellular and humoral responses of unvaccinated healthy control children with children with cystic fibrosis (CF) that were vaccinated annually. Similar virus-specific CD4+ T cell and antibody responses were observed, while an age-dependent increase of the virus-specific CD8+ T cell response was observed in unvaccinated healthy control children that was absent in vaccinated CF children. Our results indicate that annual influenza vaccination is effective against seasonal influenza, but hampers the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The consequences of these findings are discussed in the light of the development of protective immunity to seasonal and future pandemic influenza viruses.






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