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Did you make your Hobo Stove yet?

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posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 05:43 PM
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I bought this one a while back, fairly expensive for what it is, but it is made from stainless steel.





posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by whatsinaname
 
May be "The Outdoor Podcast" ? only one i know of.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 07:35 PM
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back in the day to keep warm outside peeps used





now in our throw away society, these are the norm





posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 
Good post DB. The goal of the forum is to share knowledge and exchange ideas, and you definitely do the lion share of it in my opinion. Keep up the good work.



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:00 AM
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reply to post by theserpent
 


I still have one of those pocket heaters.

It is amazing how long they burn (and how hot they get...scorched hand..)

Daddy bare- have you seen the mini stove made from two drink can bottoms that burn alcohol? Curious if they work or not.

off-topic: boy the forum police is/are on the job tonight

edit on 30-9-2011 by rbnhd76 because: forgot to reply to the OP



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:09 AM
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Thanks for the post! Hobo stoves are awesome! My brothers were all avid boy/Eagle scouts, and my parents used to have us girls pass off badges right along with our brothers. Making a hobo stove and cooking a hamburger on it is one of my favorite memories
Cant remember what badge it was for though.......

Anyway, these can be made of really any sized can ( probably not a tuna can though), and work great with just dry twigs, brush, small branches. Best burger I ever had! ( And the cheapest)



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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Originally posted by DaddyBare
reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


Ya know last night I was going to make one and show each stage of construction... but wouldn't ya know it... the wife doesn't buy coffee in metal cans anymore... I guess I'll be the one standing alone in a field with the plastic folgers can crying WTF do I do now???


The wife just took more than a dozen Girl Scouts out for a weekend and they made these stoves. Try finding 13 coffee cans!!!



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:26 AM
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has anyone constructed a base camp yet. or at least staked a tract of land that they can go to when the SHTF.

and are you guys preparing for a civil unrest, SHTF scenario, like the civil war, and what type of tips do you have to survive a nuclear catastrophe, where the air is radioactively poisoned, and the living envy the dead.



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:33 AM
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reply to post by theserpent
 


I was at a garage sale last weekend and for a dollar i bought one of those metal hand warmers its called a Jon-E it came with a felt bag i filled the hand warmer with lighter fluid and lite it let it sit a few mins and wow it works like a charm its going to be wonderful for keeping my hands warm this winter here in Minnesota..Peace,sugarcookie1



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:41 AM
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Great post DaddyBare..I enjoy all your threads there all so interesting the Hobo stove is a great idea i want to try that one out but trying to find a metal coffee can is almost impossible there mostly made of plastic but im going to a sale on sat so maybe i can find an old coffee can..S&F to you for the thread...Peace,sugarcookie1



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:57 AM
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Good memories.... I made one back in the 70's, along with the cardboard in the tuna can for a stove, though we used paraffin, right about the time I got some other survival skills at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station...... I was also shown a hatchet with a hollow handle and head that could be filled with sand or water for mass yet when empty, light to carry. I haven't been able to track one down though! Also, the lid to a #10 Can can be used as part of a trap for animals going over a log in the woods or something similar..... by creating a split star in the middle....hmmm..... pie slices not reaching the perimeter, cut from the center, basically.... so that when an animal steps over the log and onto the lid of the can placed over a small hole, the foot goes through the can lid with the numerous sharp points aimed inward, causing bleeding, leg injury, and if you are able to secure the can lid with a leash, possibly a restraint so you don't have to track the wounded animal. It was a good course..... various snares and traps, making a hammock out of a parachute, getting dropped off in the middle of the dense woods (Whidbey Island NAS in in Puget Sound, with near rain forest conditions) and finding the way back to the beach as close to a flag as possible using a compass and heading. Tree to tree..... to tree to tree to tree... and so on.



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 01:58 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


interesting. Anybody viewing this thread will one day depend on the stove

edit on 30-9-2011 by battlemaster because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by DrumsRfun
reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Why yes I did.


The paint is all burnt off of it now thankfully.

The fan has since been upgraded to steel.



This is a Wood / Gas stove. Double wall with (usually) an attached fan.
It's a little more complicated to build than a hobo stove.

Anyhow, this guy is making some good points on why NOT to use these that should taken into consideration.




posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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For the lazy consumer, i bought one of the jack stoves and it works great. There is also the wood burning one. Not to take away from making your own, but there are always options.

Pre-made Stoves



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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Another great example of a hobo stove




posted on Oct, 1 2011 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by gravitational
 


The guy in the video does bring up a great point, cooking on an open wood fire will make you........icky?
What a sissy lala.
The idea of this thread is that we will not be able to go to the local Big5 and buy propane cans for our roadside camp place.
Dunno when me and the guys get in the brush, being icky is not on our top list of concerns.
But the guy is trying to sell us something though.
Anytime someone would compare a working mans hands appearance with something undesireable, will always lose credibility with me.
No sissies allowed in mans campsite.



posted on Oct, 3 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by g146541
reply to post by gravitational
 


The guy in the video does bring up a great point, cooking on an open wood fire will make you........icky?
What a sissy lala.
The idea of this thread is that we will not be able to go to the local Big5 and buy propane cans for our roadside camp place.
Dunno when me and the guys get in the brush, being icky is not on our top list of concerns.
But the guy is trying to sell us something though.
Anytime someone would compare a working mans hands appearance with something undesireable, will always lose credibility with me.
No sissies allowed in mans campsite.


hehe.. I got a laugh out of that video, while muching on a piece of smoked ham.
" Stay Clean and Wash your Hands!"
While always important to stay clean, I don't usually plan my camping trips around handwashing.

( although I also do keep some purell or other gel-alcohol hand sanitizer in my pack for cuts and times when clean hands are needed for safety......ramble...)



posted on Oct, 4 2011 @ 02:28 PM
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whats the best way to cut the metal?



posted on Oct, 5 2011 @ 07:33 AM
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reply to post by gossipnancy
 


If you are talking of anything such as a N0.10 can or a coffee can, just a simple pair of scissors will work just fine.
After you puncture it with a knife that is.
If you are low on funds and are planning on thicker, spend 6 bucks at harbor freeight and get a pair of cheapy chinese made tin snips.
Personally though I wouls add a few bucks and get the ones made in the US, mine are.

But all that papa/grandpa whichever has put up can be done with household common kitchen tools.
Best of all no real engineering skill is needed, these things are time tested.
Now git cutting!



posted on Oct, 8 2011 @ 01:55 PM
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this works surprisingly well.

im down in the storm cellar right now using the one i made from the instructions in this thread. nothing fancy just tea.

for fuel i soaked up the bacon grease from breakfast into a paper towel and just wadded it up and lit it.

im going to keep this thing in the storm cellar for the next time the tornado sirens go off and were all down here with nothin to do.

only adjustment i made was instead of using nuts and bolts for the dampener i just bent the hanger-wire into kind of an S shape on each side and it stays in by itself.

good work DB/GD



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