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Did you make your Hobo Stove yet?

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posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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The ancestry of the hobo stove can be traced back to the invention of the No. 10 tin can. The device became prominent during America's Great Depression, an economic tragedy that thrust a great many people into the unfamiliar role of hobo's, making them take advantage of whatever resources appeared

a staple of depression eara survival.


Source infoark.org...

ADMIN NOTE: DO NOT COPY/PASTE content here without following the Creative Commons Deed and our rules for doing so.
edit on 9-29-2011 by Springer because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Nope, I haven't, never knew about this.

Very cool and useful info, thanks


S & F
edit on 29-9-2011 by Pixie777 because: eta



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Why yes I did.


The paint is all burnt off of it now thankfully.

The fan has since been upgraded to steel.




posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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I have heard of this one but have yet to try it. whats the word on heating materials, anything from candles to dry twigs? there is a problem nowadays with galvanized can's also if I recall, though I have seen more than one sucsessful attempt at this on the youtube.

semi-on topic, ats radio guys said there is an 'unleashed' survival based show on one day or another, if anyone knows how to grab one of the podcasts, or what day and times its on U2U me and keep this thread on topic =)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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Good post.

You can make a simple lasting burner for this from a standard square tobacco tin.

1 - Remove lid.
2 - Cut corrugated cardboard strips the where the thickness is the same depth as tin.
3 - Coil cardboard strips around inside of tin, and spiral into the centre.
4 - Take some candles and melt the wax into the tin over the carboard until the tin is full to just below the cardboard.

(a blowtorch speeds this up)

you can then light the cardboard and it acts as a big wick burning the candle wax slowly, easy to light and when your done just drop the lid back on top to extinguish. Over time (hours of burning the wax will burn off) simply melt a fresh candle in the top to top up.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by DrumsRfun
 


Ya know last night I was going to make one and show each stage of construction... but wouldn't ya know it... the wife doesn't buy coffee in metal cans anymore... I guess I'll be the one standing alone in a field with the plastic folgers can crying WTF do I do now???



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:51 AM
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what about a different sort of can daddybare? for example, tinned beans

or a yet to be used oil drum for big scale. (though i'm not sure where one of those would be.)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:53 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 

DaddyBare, excellent post again.

The survival items you show are so easy but important. I have used the hobo stove before with "sterno" but I know it would work with any heat source. If anyone wanted to use one of these for the first time you might want to get some extra cans to pratice with or just have an extra one for a friend.

Next time I'm hanging out in the woods. I'm taking you with me...



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:57 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by whatsinaname
 


Can sizes in the United States have an assortment of designations and sizes. For example, size 7/8 contains one serving of half a cup with an estimated weight of 4 ounces; size 1 "picnic" has two or three servings totalling one and a quarter cups with an estimated weight of 10½ ounces; size 303 has four servings totalling 2 cups weighing 15½ ounces; and size 10 cans, most widely used by food services selling to cafeterias and restaurants, have twenty-five servings totalling 13 cups with an estimated weight of 103½ ounces (size of a roughly 3 pound coffee can).

the big ones no# tens typically have a higher tin content... the reason we use both lids in this design is so as not to burn through the top... and it disperses the heat better... smaller can tend to have a higher aluminum content and will melt... bigger is better... the idea here is to reuse... but you could buy an empty paint can and make your stove from that... we used to field improvise them from ammo cans too... and their not round at all...

so for your second question...

So TUNE IN THURSDAY @ 8:00PM EASTERN via illustrial.net and give us some listeners while you learn and expand your knowledge along the way.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Disregard.
Addressed flaws in idea right as they were posted XD
edit on 29-9-2011 by ShadowMonk because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by loves a conspiricy
Good post but im concerned that you just copy and paste a lot of your threads and dont give credit where it is due...or link to the source.

I noticed you had C&P this from another site...looked at some of your other posts, to find the exact same thing




not quite a C&P

but if you like I can list my links for research
Wiki
Backwoods
Hobo stoves



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


thankee muchly, I guess its another radio show tonight for me =D

the UK is similar in can sizes but the process of making the tin not cross contaminate the food is something people should not underestimate, toxic fumes and whatnot, as such im putting a bit more research in before I make one personally (not all can's have that process but its good to know how to tell which ones definatly do. as yet I lack the info but if I recall its easier to tell from the inside lining.). heres an example of one of those youtube instuctionals I was talking about, most search results lead to steel flask modifications, this one is a fairly large can.



ed: thinking to my electronics stuff from college, the double lid idea seams like a good way to heat sink the device, it may be possible to screw on some electronic style heat sink components on the side in the case that a can you make didn't work out due to heat, just a theory though, plus you'd need the components.
edit on 29/9/2011 by whatsinaname because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


You just gave sources but none to the one where you copied it from....so here you go

infoark.org...

How do you explain that then????

Identical...word for word



edit on 29-9-2011 by loves a conspiricy because: (no reason given)


The only bit written by you is this




BTW save the plastic lid so you can stow all your gear in the can and pack it off on your next adventure


You must have missed this part at the bottom


Copyright © 1977 by Pacific Search Press, Seattle, Washington.

edit on 29-9-2011 by loves a conspiricy because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:11 AM
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I thought I would post another pic of it while in use.



Taken about 400 meters off shore of the Madawaska River.

I typically don't really use stoves because i prefer an open fire but i do see when it can come in handy.
In this picture everything was wet from the rain so i took advantage of having the stove with me to make my morning coffee.
I spent a week alone out there and it was great!!



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:14 AM
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I'm just going to say this before everyone goes ahead and trys it >_> remember can's are sharp as hell, I know this for a fact, because my nan rest her soul, once nearly cut her finger off opening a can of corned beef.

ed: copywrite or not, the process of creating one of these stoves is not subject to copywrite as it was discovered way prior to this article. however, OP may wish to alter his original post as such.
edit on 29/9/2011 by whatsinaname because: (no reason given)
(im also fairly sure you can't patent something like this, but knowing todays world I cannot say for certain.)
edit on 29/9/2011 by whatsinaname because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by whatsinaname
 



The copyright applies to the text content...not the idea of the stove.

I think this is why ATS dont allow people to copy and paste stuff....unless its given an external source, covers their arses for copyright infringement.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


unless I copy and pasted material I wrote in the first place....
this is not the only site I'm a member off...



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


So you are a zombie as well as a writer???

www.chronline.com...


Russ Mohney died Tuesday afternoon at the age of 75 from an aortic aneurysm, according to his daughter. He was The Chronicle’s outdoors writer for the past decade, but so much more.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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I keep two of them. Both the 1# cans. I dig a small narrow trench and crown the end with the can and a dirt border around the bottom of it. Then feed fuel in the trench. That way if I have to shut the fire down I can boot the can, and push the dirt right in on top of the trench. Helps if you keep them in a gallon ziplock. They get a little stinky for your pack.



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