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Which Telecoms Store Your Data the Longest? Secret Memo Tells All

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posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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Which Telecoms Store Your Data the Longest? Secret Memo Tells All


www.wired.com

The nation’s major mobile-phone providers are keeping a treasure trove of sensitive data on their customers, according to newly-released Justice Department internal memo that for the first time reveals the data retention policies of America’s largest telecoms.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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There you have it. It's known that major telco's have data retention in place, it would seem AT&T really goes that extra mile. The article refers to a 2010 document marked for law enforcement only. There is also mention in this story of the forthcoming Supreme Court case involving the use of GPS devices to monitor suspects and whether that can be performed without a warrant.
The data retention includes the ever popular txt messaging format too.

brill

www.wired.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 06:22 PM
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Here's a quick visual reference link



brill



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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This is how long the telco's retain records, but what of the data they routinely turn over to the feds? Guarantee there's no time-limit to length of time the government keeps those records.

The NSA has built-in means to access directly the telecommunications infrastructure, some directly through the major telecoms, and other means that bypass them.

nsawatch.org - Eavesdropping 101: What can the NSA do?


  • The NSA has gained direct access to the telecommunications infrastructure through some of America's largest companies
  • The agency appears to be not only targeting individuals, but also using broad "data mining" systems that allow them to intercept and evaluate the communications of millions of people within the United States.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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Watch out for posting cell phone pictures on the net with GPS data
in the exif data hidden in the images. Nothing about images being
stored in that report but clear them on the commuter first. Firefox had
a built in app to show the data but the latest update can't handle it.
So be advised to find some sort of program to check the image data
before posting on the internet. Heard about this on TV and they said
go to their website for the data.
ED: FxIF 0.4.4 works on the FireFox update.
edit on 9/28/2011 by TeslaandLyne because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
This is how long the telco's retain records, but what of the data they routinely turn over to the feds? Guarantee there's no time-limit to length of time the government keeps those records.

The NSA has built-in means to access directly the telecommunications infrastructure, some directly through the major telecoms, and other means that bypass them.

nsawatch.org - Eavesdropping 101: What can the NSA do?


  • The NSA has gained direct access to the telecommunications infrastructure through some of America's largest companies
  • The agency appears to be not only targeting individuals, but also using broad "data mining" systems that allow them to intercept and evaluate the communications of millions of people within the United States.


Agreed. This is mostly public facing news in a sense that most folks understand data is being actively mined as per your description and other methods. The fact is, if you type it, its most likely a permanent record.

brill



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by brill
 


Well the good news about this is that it tends to wake up the sheeple that their beloved technology is being used to spy on them by their government and corporations.

Tell them the NSA has a vast eavesdropping apparatus in place at the major telecoms and datacenters and they roll their eyes, but when the government's own missives leak to the public, even if it's in a Wired magazine article, maybe they'll take it a little more seriously.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 03:53 AM
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There will be no need for the government to proceed with implants. The public is only too happy to allow them all the info they need thru tracking cell phone, gps and other electronic communication.
edit on 9/29/2011 by wayno because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 09:08 AM
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reply to post by TeslaandLyne
 


tytytytytytyty

its word of mouth like this that always gets the best products spread, its always the useless crap that gets advertised to all ears,

in other words,

i didnt know that! got the download now thanks to you for telling me bout it




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