It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Why Is The Big One (NEO 2005YU55) Not On Nasa's Torino Scale Page?

page: 1
8

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:05 PM
link   
Not trying to cause a big deal here but it just seems a little odd.

Here's JPL's Sentry Risk Table broken up between NEO's observed in the past 60 days and not observed recently.
According to the site, the list was last updated today.
Neo.Jpl.Nasa.Gov...

Do a search on that page and see if you can find 2005 YU55.

Now according to JPL's Data Page (pic below), it has an Earth MOID of 0.0010 AU (that's Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance). 0.0010 AU translates to 0.39 if I'm doing it correctly (it's a factor of 389 I believe), so immediately, SpaceWeather.com's listing of 0.8 LD is inaccurate.



According to SpaceWeather.com, it has a size of 175 meters, or 574 feet, roughly over a tenth of a mile long.

The thing is coming within HALF the distance to the moon.

Another quirky thing about this to me, and I'm guessing it's about the size, is the NEO that swung by yesterday at 0.007 AU (2011SE58) had a condition code of 7 (fairly uncertain computer model orbit), yet this one (2005YU55) has a condition code of 0 (nearly dead accurate). 2009TM8 is only 8 meters long and has a lower condition code than yesterday's object.

Your Thoughts?
Good day..





edit on 28-9-2011 by rstregooski because: beer




posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:09 PM
link   
reply to post by rstregooski
 


Thanks Gooski -- while this is above my pay grade, I'll gladly s&f for a bump to try and help get the real brains on this.

S&F

Bump


edit on 28-9-2011 by Yukitup because: you'd think w/ my avi that I'd have something to offer here...



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:10 PM
link   
reply to post by rstregooski
 


want to know why its not on the site? because we are hit daily by meteors that size
YU55 is #ing miniscule, stop making a huge deal about it people!!



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:11 PM
link   
when?



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:12 PM
link   

Originally posted by SpongeBeard
reply to post by rstregooski
 


want to know why its not on the site? because we are hit daily by meteors that size
YU55 is #ing miniscule, stop making a huge deal about it people!!


Yesterday's was miniscule. This one's almost 600 feet long. 2011SE58 is on there and it's only 13 meters long. Light bulb. No star for you.
edit on 28-9-2011 by rstregooski because: beer



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:14 PM
link   
reply to post by rstregooski
 


And the clues start to reveal themselves.

11/9/11.

If it is made out of Iron we may just be in a world of trouble. Especially if Elenin was the Harold Camping of Space objects.
edit on 28-9-2011 by LightAssassin because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by SpongeBeard
reply to post by rstregooski
 


want to know why its not on the site? because we are hit daily by meteors that size
YU55 is #ing miniscule, stop making a huge deal about it people!!


Really. 175 meters is minuscule?

Thank you for bringing your enlightening and insightful bucket of nothing to this thread.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:15 PM
link   
reply to post by rstregooski
 


It's probably because it doesn't have a chance of hitting us. The margin of error on its distance to Earth is probably something like .001%. Even if it is coming close to Earth the odds of it actually hitting Earth are so astronomical that you might as well call it 0%.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:16 PM
link   
reply to post by SpongeBeard
 


lol no were not....look up 2005 yu55, then try to tell me its miniscule



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by Xcalibur254
reply to post by rstregooski
 


It's probably because it doesn't have a chance of hitting us. The margin of error on its distance to Earth is probably something like .001%. Even if it is coming close to Earth the odds of it actually hitting Earth are so astronomical that you might as well call it 0%.


Granted, but everything on the Sentry Risk page has impact probabilities ranging from 1e-5 to 1e-21, and most of them are even outside the lunar orbit.
edit on 28-9-2011 by rstregooski because: beer



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:28 PM
link   
reply to post by OUNjahhryn
 


It actually is quite small for an asteroid. Also, it does have no chance of hitting us. Last February it had a rating of 1 on the Torino Scale, but in April 2010 new observations were made and its orbital characteristics were updated. From these new observations it was determined that 2005 YU55 poses no risk to Earth and this has been confirmed over the past 17 months. So, much like Elenin, there is no reason to be worried about this at all. Of course, much like Elenin I expect my words to go unheeded until November 8 when it passes by harmlessly.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:33 PM
link   
Its not on the scale because its 400 meters in diameter and its easy to track...IE it hasn't altered its trajectory and is still on a harmless approach. The bigger the rock, the easier it is to see...the smaller....the harder it is to see and track.

2011 SO5 on the other hand is 40 meters and is on a collision path which means the pull of the earth is pulling it into us not around us like YU55.

Thats why it's not on the scale.....chances are damn skippy that it's gonna miss period....others tho may not depending on how it approaches the earths path.

Also understand that if this is an iron ball, that means it will be effected more so by pull of the earth due to the electro-magnetic composition of the asteroid making it more likely to hittting as it's pulled more to us on approach. If its made out of dirt......the laws of attraction do not apply the same way as it is a less dense non-metallic material that may not be effected by the magnetism of the earth. Thus less chance of a burp in the path on approach . Gravity is not the only factor that makes an asteroid take its path.

In the end though the approach calculations are pretty spot on not considering any other mitigating factors that may alter the rocks trajectory due to extreme space weather. can't see the future ya know.

Angle of approach has a big part in this as well...to answer your question. We do get hit all the time however by rocks the size of basketballs on a daily basis.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by Xcalibur254
reply to post by OUNjahhryn
 


So, much like Elenin, there is no reason to be worried about this at all.


Granted, yet this thread is about why it's not on JPL's risk page, which contain NEO's that are almost all between 1e-5 to 1e-10 % impact, nearly all zero on the torino scale, much further than the lunar orbit and smaller in size. Riddle me that.

edit on 28-9-2011 by rstregooski because: beer



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:34 PM
link   
reply to post by rstregooski
 


Check down at the bottom for the definition of Year Range.


Time span over which impacts have been detected. Typically, searches are conducted 100 years into the future.


With current observations 2005 YU55 has no possibility of causing an impact within the next 100 years.

Arecibo telescope tracks 'potentially dangerous' asteroid within 1.5 million miles of Earth



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:39 PM
link   
reply to post by BooKrackers
 


Great answer. Still though, that page has plenty that are almost a kilometer in diameter and further orbital intersection ranges. That's what caught my eye..



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:39 PM
link   
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


correct about yu55, yet the distant future of these things is a projected calculation of approach....as it closes in....they alter it to reflect actual approach.


just sayin



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:41 PM
link   
If YU55 is 175 metres in length, that is pretty big. That is as long as an Australian Rules Football Ground, and they arent even that long either I dont think!!!



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 05:55 PM
link   
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


good point. Seems the condition code has a lot to do with it. Still interesting the uncertainty or high condition code with a some on that list that are much larger than this one and with a further miss distance..



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 09:34 PM
link   
reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


yeah but its not "minuscule" and we dont get "hit daily" but ones that size lol, thats all i was saying.



new topics

top topics



 
8

log in

join