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Why are you/they called Freemasons?

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posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 06:23 PM
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I'm really tempted to speculate on the answer, but I won't.


I haven't been able to find anything except for those sites explaining the origins of masonry. But nothing about why the name "freemasonry" is used. Historical significance? Personal present significance? Both? Something else?




posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 06:31 PM
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Originally posted by Jamuhn
I'm really tempted to speculate on the answer, but I won't.


I haven't been able to find anything except for those sites explaining the origins of masonry. But nothing about why the name "freemasonry" is used. Historical significance? Personal present significance? Both? Something else?


One traditional answer is that the original operative Lodges were of Free Stone Masons, that is, Masons who worked in the lighter, more carveable stone used in statues and other similar filligree (known, of course, as "Free Stone").

Another traditional answer is that the original Operative Lodges consisted of Stonemasons who, because of the nature of their expertise and the wide requirement of their services, were allowed to move more freely between countries in medieval Europe.

A third traditional answer was that the original Operative Lodges consisted only of "free" workers, rather than "indentured" workers or other servants or slaves. This idea is borne out to a certain degree by the ancient requirement that Freemasons be "free by birth" (so that their previous Master could not come around, claim the are still slaves, and force them to reveal the secrets of the Order).

P.S. I salute your restraint in refusing to speculate about this subject, and commend it. It takes a strong mind to weigh facts without predisposition or prejudice.

[edit on 26-8-2004 by AlexKennedy]



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 06:33 PM
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The term comes from the time when we were primarily operative stonemasons, and it referred to Free men, that were ACCEPTED as Masons, but were only speculative masons. Hence Free and Accepted Masons, or Freemasons.

There are also Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, but they are still all "Freemasons".

I hope this helps.

Just out of curiosity, and I KNOW I am going to regret asking this, but what did YOU think it meant?



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 06:39 PM
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Haha, thanks for the queue theron.

Well, one reason I thought was the freedom of mind associated with the teachings gained while part of the Order. Another way to put it, gaining freedom of knowledge, freedom from limitations, and even freeing others in certain ways etc. by or from your work.

And then, to go back really far, I thought it might be represenative of the freedom of the Israelis from the Mason/Brick work they performed while in Egypt. Then only to be freed from the work of God. I have been reading the Bible and I read Exodus a couple days ago so the comparison stuck in my head.

Let me get back to you on your responses, I want to think for a second and try to understand them better.

[edit on 26-8-2004 by Jamuhn]



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 06:46 PM
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Ah, I see the historical significance now. In this day since slavery is virtually extinct, does Masonry or maybe even individual Masons themselves take on a new meaning for the word, something more personal or up to date with times? Or is it more reserved to reflect the history of Masonry?



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by Jamuhn
I'm really tempted to speculate on the answer, but I won't.


I haven't been able to find anything except for those sites explaining the origins of masonry. But nothing about why the name "freemasonry" is used. Historical significance? Personal present significance? Both? Something else?



Originally posted by AlexKennedy
One traditional answer is that the original operative Lodges were of Free Stone Masons, that is, Masons who worked in the lighter, more carveable stone used in statues and other similar filligree (known, of course, as "Free Stone").

Another traditional answer is that the original Operative Lodges consisted of Stonemasons who, because of the nature of their expertise and the wide requirement of their services, were allowed to move more freely between countries in medieval Europe.

A third traditional answer was that the original Operative Lodges consisted only of "free" workers, rather than "indentured" workers or other servants or slaves. This idea is borne out to a certain degree by the ancient requirement that Freemasons be "free by birth" (so that their previous Master could not come around, claim the are still slaves, and force them to reveal the secrets of the Order).


Whoa! That's what it means? All this time I thought it meant things were "Free"... free parking, free passes, heck, "get out of jail free"... you name it... gratis... you know, sans compensatory need...

Uh, oh…

p.s. AK, “filigree” has only one “L” and “carveable” is not a word, “easily carved”, would be the proper implementation of the Queen's English…*scurries, and hides from the Bunyanesque Canadian*.


Spell Checking Monkeys, not just for ATS posts anymore…



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:02 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me
Whoa! That's what it means? All this time I thought it meant things were "Free"... free parking, free passes, heck, "get out of jail free"... you name it... gratis... you know, sans compensatory need...

Uh, oh…

p.s. AK, “filigree” has only one “L” and “carveable” is not a word, “easily carved”, would be the proper implementation of the Queen's English…*scurries, and hides from the Bunyanesque Canadian*.


Spell Checking Monkeys, not just for ATS posts anymore…


Or perhaps it is to promote the fact that the 666th member of Masonry gets a lifetime supply of bricks.

Dude, I am so kidding, please don't take it seriously, if it is a bad joke though let me know.

On a serious note, the history of the word could still be relevant in that we are all free men in some fashion. And so, being a part of the Order, you are Free Masons versus Free Men...



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me
p.s. AK, “filigree” has only one “L” and “carveable” is not a word, “easily carved”, would be the proper implementation of the Queen's English…


Arrgh! Houisted bye mai owne Picard!



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by Jamuhn
On a serious note, the history of the word could still be relevant in that we are all free men in some fashion. And so, being a part of the Order, you are Free Masons versus Free Men...


Well, if we want to get into the realm of the purely made-up, the meaning of "Freemason" I like to think of (even though it's etymologically absurd) is this: Stonemasons retrieve stone from the depths, give it form, utility, and beauty, and employ it in the service of humanity.

Freemasons retrieve freedom from the depths, give it form, utility, and beauty, and employ it in the service of humanity.

Of course, this is not what the word means, but it is evocative nonetheless.



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:10 PM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy
Arrgh! Houisted bye mai owne Picard!


Didn't figure you for a Trekkie AK...




posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy

Originally posted by Jamuhn
On a serious note, the history of the word could still be relevant in that we are all free men in some fashion. And so, being a part of the Order, you are Free Masons versus Free Men...


Well, if we want to get into the realm of the purely made-up, the meaning of "Freemason" I like to think of (even though it's etymologically absurd) is this: Stonemasons retrieve stone from the depths, give it form, utility, and beauty, and employ it in the service of humanity.

Freemasons retrieve freedom from the depths, give it form, utility, and beauty, and employ it in the service of humanity.

Of course, this is not what the word means, but it is evocative nonetheless.


Yes, it is. I like the metaphor you gave. I guess after learning the historical significance, that is what I was curious about: what the word freemason means to you. Maybe you should petition your lodge to obtain that quote, I think it would be very inspirational especially to new members.

[edit on 26-8-2004 by Jamuhn]



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy
Freemasons retrieve freedom from the depths, give it form, utility, and beauty, and employ it in the service of humanity.


That is so deep and poetic.


Here, I thought it was because I could get your Order to come over and make me a brick BBQ in the backyard, and not have to pay for it.

Well, ok...maybe some beer, eh?



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:17 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me

Originally posted by AlexKennedy
Arrgh! Houisted bye mai owne Picard!


Didn't figure you for a Trekkie AK...


Hmmm. His signature looks like "Polril Saivik." Maybe there's something he's not telling us?



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:19 PM
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Originally posted by ZeddicusZulZorander
Well, ok...maybe some beer, eh?


Now THAT was deep and poetic. Being Irish (well, not really, but at least I'm fake Irish), if you give me enough Mooseheads, I will be deep and poetic -- or puke on your rug -- it's kind of a gamble.

[edit on 26-8-2004 by AlexKennedy]



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:23 PM
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Originally posted by ZeddicusZulZorander
Well, ok...maybe some beer, eh?


I believe it is time to compose a "Master's Wages" thread; some beer... I think not... a lot of beer, possibly... followed by the relaxing fellowship of extended scotch sippin'; single malt of course, and of a suitable age (I like my scotch the way I like my women...of legal age). The "Good Works" of BBQ grill construction should always be compensated... in due fashion.




posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:25 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me
a lot of beer, possibly... followed by the relaxing fellowship of extended scotch sippin';


Now, now, MM, we must not forget the ancient injuction of the Egyptians:



Liquor, then beer, in the clear;
Beer, then Liquor, never been sicker.




posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:27 PM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy
Now THAT was deep and poetic. Being Irish (well, not really, but at least I'm fake Irish), if you give me enough Mooseheads, I will be deep and poetic -- or puke on your rug -- it's kind of a gamble.


Just like I am fake Scottish. I too would consume much suds and then go for a sixer of crullers at Tim Hortons, eh? As for the giving mass quantities and Scotch...of course.

But no more All Seeing Eye tattoos when I'm drunk.
You Masons...always the jokers.



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:29 PM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy

Originally posted by Mirthful Me
a lot of beer, possibly... followed by the relaxing fellowship of extended scotch sippin';


Now, now, MM, we must not forget the ancient injuction of the Egyptians:



Liquor, then beer, in the clear;
Beer, then Liquor, never been sicker.



Haha, I lived by that rule for a year of my life. I found out some more to add to the list, but I'd probably be warned if I said em.
...*cough*pot*cough*

[edit on 26-8-2004 by Jamuhn]



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 07:40 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me
a lot of beer, possibly... followed by the relaxing fellowship of extended scotch sippin';



Originally posted by AlexKennedy
Now, now, MM, we must not forget the ancient injuction of the Egyptians:


From: Some misguided resource
Liquor, then beer, in the clear;
Beer, then Liquor, never been sicker.




From: Divine Musings of Bacchus
Liquor after beer... have no fear...

Beer after liquor... always sicker...

A night of whisk(e)y... go home frisky...


As we can clearly see, the need to properly transition from Labor to Refreshment is definitively (as all things Masonic are
) outlined.

p.s. AK, I hope the Egyptians were providing you with an “injunction”?



posted on Aug, 26 2004 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by ZeddicusZulZorander
Just like I am fake Scottish.


There's a lot of us Canucks that are fake something.



I too would consume much suds and then go for a sixer of crullers at Tim Hortons, eh?


This is the essential Canadian experience. Drink, drink, drink, 'till you can't tell it's -27 out, then head to Timmy's for a six of doughnuts and one of those big coffees that I swear must contain horse steroids or something. Then head back into the jalopy with no heat and head to your friend's acreage to sleep it off. Ahhh, college days.



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