It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Orbit condition code 8 OR Torino scale 8 - Is there a difference?

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:25 PM
link   
Could somebody who has the smart tell me if there's a difference between orbit condition code, and torino scale please?
Because I do not have the smart, and if people like me are confused between them, and think a condition code of 8, could be a torino code of 8.. then there will be a lot more fear-mongering to come on the 30th september.
I have tried googling, but all that keeps coming up is threads from another forum, who are weeping themselves into hysterics atm without checking this same question first!

Thanks for your time.

edit on 27-9-2011 by Deplume because: changed name of code




posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:29 PM
link   
The Torino Scale:

neo.jpl.nasa.gov...

I have no idea what comet condition 8 means?

But no object is expected to hit us in the near future, anyone suggesting otherwise are nasty people trying to scare you for fun.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:33 PM
link   
Torino scale
8. A collision is certain, capable of causing localized destruction for an impact over land or possibly a tsunami if close offshore. Such events occur on average between once per 50 years and once per several thousand years.

But i don't know what comet condition code 8 means



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Essan
 


Well there is a near earth object that has a condition code of 8. JPL/Nasa gave it that code.

If condition code = torino code, then that suggest a slight problem assuming they haven't made a mistake.
Of course I'm not going to make the same mistake and go off the deep end, I'd just like to know the difference.. someone in here must know, you know?



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:35 PM
link   
If you mean the condition code that is allocated to each object in the JPL Small Bodies Database, then no....it is not the same as the Torino scale. The "condition code" is actually related to the accuracy of the computed orbit, and refers to both comets and asteroids. The lower the number, the higher the computational accuracy. If you check out C/2010 X1 Elenin, you will notice that it does not have a condition code anymore. This means that the orbit is now relatively well established (in the present epoch).
edit on 27-9-2011 by Mogget because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:38 PM
link   


OCC19 (Orbit Condition Code) provides a rating of the quality of the computed orbit based on the available observations. In this scale 0 is the best and 7 the worst with 1 the typical value for numbered asteroids.


Read this for more info - New coorbital dynamics in the solar system



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:41 PM
link   
This is new to my ears, s+f.

But sorry i can't be no help on the subject, have the same knowledge as yourself about codes and numbers.

What I've learnt about doomsday theorists and the theories though, is do your own research and add a pinch of common sense. The internet is a lil like television, dont believe everything you see or read.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:48 PM
link   
Maybe this is what Leonid Elenin really means? Level Eight Object Non-avoidable Impact Discovery: Extinction Level Event Nine Imminent November. Doom doom doom doom DOOOM!



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:55 PM
link   
So on a scale of 0-8... 0 would mean 'we know for sure it will follow this orbital path.. and 8 means *shrug*


Oh JPL you know how to fill a gal with confidence, especially when you have 0.014AU to play around with...



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:56 PM
link   
The comet everyone is freaking out over that will pass by Earth today is only 43 feet wide. Even if it does hit the planet, which it isn't going to do won't even make it through the atmosphere before it burns up.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by cybro
The comet everyone is freaking out over that will pass by Earth today is only 43 feet wide. Even if it does hit the planet, which it isn't going to do won't even make it through the atmosphere before it burns up.



It's closer than that on the 30th, especially if you do it hour by hour, not day by day...
But thank you for the heads up, that's good to know.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 08:19 PM
link   
so guys. what numerical Torino scale value has been assigned for 2011SO5?






posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 08:33 PM
link   
reply to post by ignant
 

With a close approach of 1,301,382 miles and low uncertainty, that would be a zero.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 02:03 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by ignant
 

With a close approach of 1,301,382 miles and low uncertainty, that would be a zero.


Correct!
There's no prize for you though, You must have missed the memo. Thinking logically and dowsing the flames of fear with ice cold buckets of reasoning is SO last week..
Could you not accessorize with some panic?


What do you think of the orbit conditioning number of 8?
Is that fairly normal for NEO's they don't know heaps about?



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 02:11 AM
link   
reply to post by Deplume
 

Since the orbital calculations were based on only 26 observation over 5 days, yes, pretty normal.



new topics

top topics



 
2

log in

join