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NBCs David Bloom, 39, dies in Iraq

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posted on Apr, 6 2003 @ 12:41 PM
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NEW YORK, April 6 David Bloom, an NBC News correspondent embedded with the U.S. Armys 3rd Infantry Division outside Baghdad, died Sunday, NBC announced. Bloom, a 39-year-old husband and father of three, died of an apparent pulmonary embolism, the company said. He was the second American journalist to die in Iraq since the war began....

www.msnbc.com...




posted on Apr, 6 2003 @ 01:52 PM
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Although this is quite sad, he knew what he was getting into when he agreed to put his life on the line and participate in the war. Was it really worth it? Was it worth having civilian reporters embedded in military units? To the government this is just another casualty of the war.



posted on Apr, 6 2003 @ 08:02 PM
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Originally posted by MKULTRA

Although this is quite sad, he knew what he was getting into when he agreed to put his life on the line and participate in the war. Was it really worth it? Was it worth having civilian reporters embedded in military units? To the government this is just another casualty of the war.


you make it sound like he was killed by the iraqi's he died of non-combat causes it cud've happened when he was at the news station in the USA



posted on Apr, 7 2003 @ 08:36 AM
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the stress of having shells hit all around you might have contributed a little here....

However, as was said, he knew the job was dangerous when he took it Fred...(wonders if anyone will get that reference...hehe...)



posted on Apr, 7 2003 @ 09:22 AM
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"Embedded Reporters"

- Can't mainline images, video or reports unless pre screened by a military filter.
- Strategic move to have a simpatico chronicler on the military's side...how can you help but to be sympathetic & biased in that situation?
- Strategic move to have the anticipated causalities of reporters lionized, as was this individual by a teary eyed Katie Couric and a somber Tim Russet, further cementing the propaganda push of the war.

Right said Fred....am I close?



posted on Apr, 7 2003 @ 11:08 AM
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I just find it hard to believe that anyone thinks reporters have the right to broadcast video from a war going on right now without going through a military screener of some sort. Do the lives of the people stationed there mean anything? Why don't we just send them an email telling them exactly where we're going, what we're going to do etc... so they can wait and ambush on the way in.



posted on Apr, 7 2003 @ 11:39 AM
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pulmonary embolism is most likely caused by him having to sit in the same position for long periods of time. This combined with the ruggedness of the terrain they traveled over. Blood clot was formed, then lossened and travel to his heart. Im sure it wasn't a cakewalk out there for him.



posted on Apr, 7 2003 @ 11:44 AM
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the reference was to an old cartoon that used to air with Dudley Do Right, Tom Slick, and George of the Jungle.....Super Chicken. Super Chicken had a sidekick, a lion named Fred. Fred would always get injured during their escapades, and Super Chicken would say, "You knew the job was dangerous when you tool it Fred"....



posted on Apr, 7 2003 @ 01:06 PM
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That is is another loss of life in the war with Iraq!

I am sorry that he died, several UK news broadcasts showed reports he made when riding with the U.S. military. He seemed so young and reminded me of a typical guy from California.

Whether he died of a heart attack, stress, or sitting in a cramped position - the sad fact remains that at 39 & possibly with a family, he has died.

Have we become so focussed upon, or possibly obsessed with our debates that we've lost sight of the precious gift of life?

This man is dead and may leave a grieving wife and children.

I hope the tragety of war never becomes just reports and stastics, because living, breathing people are involved. Be they Iraqi, American, British or whatever - people are living beings and to have their life ended, families devastated and future plans destroyed - is so tragic.

I am sorry that he's died and offer my heartfelt condolences to his family.

May we please respect the dead?

Deep

[Edited on 7-4-2003 by deepwaters]



posted on Apr, 7 2003 @ 01:41 PM
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I agree. It's never a good thing when someone dies. I just wish that people could prevent these things from happening in the first place. We have to remember the conditions in Iraq are not quite Country Club. Soldiers are trained in a way that just a wee bit different than reporters. These are EXTREME conditions. I feel terrible for this guy, honestly, and his family... but I wish people would learn from this. I mean some of those embedded reporters are like 60, sitting in tanks for hours and hours, cramped up. Sandstorms, ultra high stress levels of being shot at... that's not good...







 
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