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Hidden GMO ingredients?

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posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 04:21 PM
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I eat allot of spaghetti because its cheap. So I thought I would look up the ingredients to see if I could find any GMO's. The ingredients of the spaghetti are, Durum semolina,Niacin,Ferrous slilfate, thiamine monontirate,riboflavin, and folic acid.

I looked where those ingredients come from and how they are processed. Riboflavin is the only ingredient I cant find how its processed. I found that it can come from Milk cheese leafy green vegetables liverbeans, peas and SOYBEANS yeast almonds asparagus bananas okra chard cottage cheese yogurt meat eggs fish.

I looked on WIKI and it said
"The latter organism has been genetically modified to both increase the bacteria's production of riboflavin and to introduce an antibiotic (ampicillin) resistance marker, and is now successfully employed at a commercial scale to produce riboflavin for feed and food fortification purposes."

Its in the Industrial synthesis section
en.wikipedia.org...

MAYBE IM READING IT WRONG, IF I HAVE MADE A MISTAKE IN THE NEXT PARAGRAPH PLEASE CORRECT ME.

It says antibiotic resistance and a increase of bacteria. A BACTERIA IN YOUR GUT THAT IS ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE!!! I am sure most of you know one of the effects of GMO food is non stop growth of GMO bacteria in your small instance witch causes it to thin and tear leading to leaky gut syndrome. So is it safe to say that the ingredient they use to extract Riboflavin is soy beans? Does any one know where the majority of Riboflavin comes from for spaghetti? Spaghetti saves me a ton of money in these hard times, it would suck if I am force to stop eating it.

What other hidden GMO ingredients are their? When shopping I only look to see if their is, Corn, Soy, canola and cotton seed, plainly listed in the ingredients.




edit on 26-9-2011 by 8ILlBILl8 because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-9-2011 by 8ILlBILl8 because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-9-2011 by 8ILlBILl8 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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It says antibiotic resistance and a increase of bacteria. A BACTERIA IN YOUR GUT THAT IS ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE!!!


You may want to retake your microbiology classes.




posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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*ingredients

A stickler when it comes to typos in the subject line that's all



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by boncho



It says antibiotic resistance and a increase of bacteria. A BACTERIA IN YOUR GUT THAT IS ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE!!!


You may want to retake your microbiology classes.



Can you explain? I know that studies have shown that GMO foods cause a bacteria to grow in your lower intestine. Bacteria naturally grows in your intestine, but this bacteria is genetically modified and will continue to grow in your intestine for the rest of your life. This bacteria is all so known for making animals resistant to anti biotic's. %70 of your immune system relies's on your small intestine.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by boncho


It says antibiotic resistance and a increase of bacteria. A BACTERIA IN YOUR GUT THAT IS ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE!!!

You may want to retake your microbiology classes.


First up, the industrial process you mentioned was just that.

You posted information out of context. The first part missing:


Various biotechnological processes have been developed for industrial scale riboflavin biosynthesis using different microorganisms


This implies a bio-reactor, where microorganisms are creating a final product. Much like how they produce lyseine which is feed to just about all animals meant for slaughter.

This is a bioreactor

And then you posted about the modification of one strain of organism "Bacillus subtilis"


...such as Ashbya gossypii, Candida famata and Candida flaveri, as well as the bacteria Corynebacterium ammoniagenes and Bacillus subtilis


Notice the following paragraph.


The latter organism has been genetically modified to both increase the bacteria's production of riboflavin and to introduce an antibiotic (ampicillin) resistance marker, and is now successfully employed at a commercial scale to produce riboflavin for feed and food fortification purposes.



The marker gene that was used on theses organisms is not present in commercially available plants.



I think your original post was directed at the antibiotic resistance gene being expressed in transgenic plants and or microorganisms that are directly associated with the food supply.

In 1998 the FDA stated:


The workshop concluded that there is no recorded evidence for transfer of genes from plants to microorganisms in the gut and that if transfer did occur, any health concern would depend on many factors, including the ability of the transformed microorganisms to replicate in the gut and to express the gene product.

This conclusion was reaffirmed in the 1996 joint Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)/WHO Expert Consultation on Biotechnology and Food Safety (WHO, 1996), which stated that the most relevant food safety issue concerning gene transfer is the potential consequence of the transfer of an introduced gene from material derived from a genetically modified organism to microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract, in such a way that the gene can be successfully incorporated and expressed, and impact human or animal safety. The consultation added that there is no recorded evidence for the transfer of genes from plants to microorganisms in the gut and that there are no authenticated reports of such bacterial transformation in the environment of the human gastrointestinal tract.
1


...basically, that the expression of resistance gene would not transfer to people through their gut.
edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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If you eat a lot of pagetti, I highly recommend that you invest in a pasta maker, 50$ to 100$

eggs
flour

voila!

sauce:

1 tomato diced
1/4 an onion chopped
olive oil
1 garlic clove
(your choice of meat)(optional)
(parsley,cilantro,thyme,basil) (optional)

cost per person: 1.37$ CAD when made fresh. (optional, portioning can range from $2.10 to $4.03)
edit on 26-9-2011 by misfitofscience because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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Popularized by "Genetic Roulette" people have been led to believe that antiobiotic resistance genes will affect them through their intestines, yet there are a number of peer reviewed studies that show the DNA is not transferred during consumption of transgenic plants, addressed Here.


Our gut already contains billions of bacteria carrying resistances to kanamycin and ampicillin, the two most commonly used antibiotic marker genes in GM crops. There is a huge reservoir of ampicillin resistance genes in soil and these can be readily transmitted to gut bacteria.



Expert scientific opinion has repeatedly reaffirmed that the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in GM foods is unable to change the level of antibiotic resistance present in gut bacteria (Bennett PM and others 2004, EFSA 2004, Salyers A (n.d.), van den Eede and others 2004).



Smith avoids mentioning expert advice and evidence that contradicts his assertions about antibiotic resistance, and does not provide access to the detailed and extensive deliberations that led to approvals of crops having antibiotic markers (Bennett and others 2004. EFSA 2004, Goldstein and others 2005, Miki , McHugh 2004, Ramessar and others 2007, Salyers (n.d.), van den Eede and others 2004).


Source


The breakdown is that the antibiotic resistance genes are already found in soil bacteria. The change in the bacteria in your gut, can happen from both the bacteria in transgenic plants, but also from natural bacteria in the environment.


Our gut already contains billions of bacteria carrying resistances to kanamycin and ampicillin, the two most commonly used antibiotic marker genes in GM crops. There is a huge reservoir of ampicillin resistance genes in soil and these can be readily transmitted to gut bacteria.


If the fear is that this is going to make you antibiotic resistant in someway (you, not the bacteria in your gut) it would have already happened, being that there are already bacteria in your gut that have the same resistance.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 05:13 PM
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Originally posted by boncho

Originally posted by boncho


It says antibiotic resistance and a increase of bacteria. A BACTERIA IN YOUR GUT THAT IS ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE!!!

You may want to retake your microbiology classes.


First up, the industrial process you mentioned was just that.

You posted information out of context. The first part missing:


Various biotechnological processes have been developed for industrial scale riboflavin biosynthesis using different microorganisms


This implies a bio-reactor, where microorganisms are creating a final product. Much like how they produce lyseine which is feed to just about all animals meant for slaughter.

This is a bioreactor

And then you posted about the modification of one strain of organism "Bacillus subtilis"


...such as Ashbya gossypii, Candida famata and Candida flaveri, as well as the bacteria Corynebacterium ammoniagenes and Bacillus subtilis


Notice the following paragraph.


The latter organism has been genetically modified to both increase the bacteria's production of riboflavin and to introduce an antibiotic (ampicillin) resistance marker, and is now successfully employed at a commercial scale to produce riboflavin for feed and food fortification purposes.



The marker gene that was used on theses organisms is not present in commercially available plants.



I think your original post was directed at the antibiotic resistance gene being expressed in transgenic plants and or microorganisms that are directly associated with the food supply.

In 1998 the FDA stated:


The workshop concluded that there is no recorded evidence for transfer of genes from plants to microorganisms in the gut and that if transfer did occur, any health concern would depend on many factors, including the ability of the transformed microorganisms to replicate in the gut and to express the gene product.

This conclusion was reaffirmed in the 1996 joint Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)/WHO Expert Consultation on Biotechnology and Food Safety (WHO, 1996), which stated that the most relevant food safety issue concerning gene transfer is the potential consequence of the transfer of an introduced gene from material derived from a genetically modified organism to microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract, in such a way that the gene can be successfully incorporated and expressed, and impact human or animal safety. The consultation added that there is no recorded evidence for the transfer of genes from plants to microorganisms in the gut and that there are no authenticated reports of such bacterial transformation in the environment of the human gastrointestinal tract.
1


...basically, that the expression of resistance gene would not transfer to people through their "gut".
edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)


The FDA all so approved aspartame and lied about it knowing how harmful it is. I do not trust government studies or studies witch are conducted by corporations witch are trying to sell the product witch is being tested.
BACILLUS SUBTILIS used to make riboflavin is genetically modified



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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ec.europa.eu...

Producer organism

B. subtilis is an aerobic endospore-forming bacterium commonly found in nature and generally not considered to have a pathogenic or toxigenic potential. There is a history of safe use of this bacterium in large-scale fermentation production of specialty chemicals, of enzymes used in food production processes, and of several traditional relationships to food. It is used traditionally in East Asia for the fermentative production of Natto from wheat starch, a product also obtainable in western countries. It is thus an organism with a tradition in food use although the actual food product is little known in the European Union. The organism is also involved in many types of food spoilage.

The strain of B. subtilis used in riboflavin production is RB50::[pRF69] n[pRF93] m.Ade+ (3), a non-sporing derivative of B.subtilis 168, which had been produced by classical mutation and into which the two specific plasmids pRF69 and pRF93 had been chromosomally, and thus stably, integrated into the bacterial genome and amplified 20-25-fold and 10-15-fold respectively. The strain was identified by the Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen (DSM Braunschweig, Germany) as Bacillus subtilis. The genetic modification includes the chromosomal integration of the following elements:

- pUC 19, a derivative of the common E. coli cloning vector pBR 322, harbouring a DNA fragment carrying the rib operon and the bla gene encoding ampicillin resistance, which latter is not expressed in B. subtilis.

- SPO1-15, the constitutive promoter derived from a B. subtilis bacteriophage which enables efficient expression of the rib operon.

- the marker gene tet, encoding tetracycline resistance, originally derived from Bacillus cereus.

- the marker gene cat, encoding chloramphenicol resistance, originally derived from Staphylococcus aureus.

The tet as well as the cat gene can be considered to be constituents of the natural gene pool of a wide range of Gram-positive organisms including B. subtilis. The chromosomal organisation of the gene inserts has been demonstrated by their functionality as well as by southern blot analysis. These data were supplemented by sequencing of specific fragments.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 05:41 PM
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Originally posted by boncho


If the fear is that this is going to make you antibiotic resistant in someway (you, not the bacteria in your gut) it would have already happened, being that there are already bacteria in your gut that have the same resistance.



Its the unknown that scars me. I just found out about the antibiotic studies a few days ago. I have tried to stay away from GMO foods for at least 2 years. I have only read a few articles about it, the main reason i stay away from GMO foods is because of my moral grounds of supporting a corrupt company such as Monsanto's witch is trying take full control of the agricultural business. Have you read about the rat experiments? GMO food was feed to a group of rats and the other group of rats was given the same food but non GMO. The GMO rats wear not able to produce babies in 2-3 generations, some of them got brain tumor's.

I find it fishy that GMO food is in every thing. Allot of it is produced so its cheap but its in stuff that does not need it. For example I wanted some tuna a couple days ago, I all ways used to eat tuna after a good work out for some protein. I used to be able to buy tuna, in water witch contained some olive oil water salt and tuna. Now, tuna has soy bean FLAKES. Not soybean oil but soy bean flakes in it. Why would they spend the extra money to add a ingredient witch was never needed? Its in all processed food unless its marketed as non GMO. Monsanto's is making a # ton of money. Like i said its fishy.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by misfitofscience
If you eat a lot of pagetti, I highly recommend that you invest in a pasta maker, 50$ to 100$

eggs
flour

voila!

sauce:

1 tomato diced
1/4 an onion chopped
olive oil
1 garlic clove
(your choice of meat)(optional)
(parsley,cilantro,thyme,basil) (optional)

cost per person: 1.37$ CAD when made fresh. (optional, portioning can range from $2.10 to $4.03)
edit on 26-9-2011 by misfitofscience because: (no reason given)


Thanks, I will get one. It seems that I have no choice but to make money own food from scratch.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by 8ILlBILl8


Now, tuna has soy bean FLAKES. Not soybean oil but soy bean flakes in it. Why would they spend the extra money to add a ingredient witch was never needed?

 


Probably to increase the protein content. Perhaps to cut down on cost.


Soy protein TVP can also be used as a low cost/high nutrition extender in comminuted meat and poultry products, and in tuna fish salads.


Source



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by 8ILlBILl8


BACILLUS SUBTILIS used to make riboflavin is genetically modified

 



A first year Chemist or Biologist would realize that they are not packing microorganisms used to produce vitamins, into food....




When the growth and production phase ends, the substance of interest is isolated and purified. No traces of microorganisms are present in the final product, and no microbial DNA is detectable.
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edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by 8ILlBILl8


I do not trust government studies or studies witch are conducted by corporations witch are trying to sell the product witch is being tested.

 


Which studies are you talking about specifically? That is quite the generalization.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by boncho
reply to post by 8ILlBILl8


BACILLUS SUBTILIS used to make riboflavin is genetically modified

 



A first year Chemist or Biologist would realize that they are not packing microorganisms used to produce vitamins, into food....




When the growth and production phase ends, the substance of interest is isolated and purified. No traces of microorganisms are present in the final product, and no microbial DNA is detectable.
1
edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)


So if it has no dna then how does the same bacteria continue to grow?



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by 8ILlBILl8



So if it has no dna then how does the same bacteria continue to grow?
 


Your original post is about the industrial/commercial production of vitamins.


Continue to grow where??



I'm not sure you understand the process. Microorganisms are put into a bioreactor with materials that they consume and produce a product.

(Similar to bees producing Honey)

At the end, the product is washed, purified, and then sold to be an additive. (The bees are not in the Honey)


Just like millions of other types of synthesis out there. I bet you didn't know there are a number of hygiene products and consumables with ingredients that involved synthesis using have natural cyanide (one form or another)... Which is removed

...Does not mean we are eating or bathing in cyanide...
edit on 26-9-2011 by boncho because: Bad wording, quickly posted.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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Another one to look out for is sugar.

It started in 2008. They messed with sugar. How much does that stink?

ETA: Here's some information on the legal history: politics of sugar

Again folks, the USDA is a political body, and functions as such.
edit on 9/27/2011 by chasingbrahman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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Originally posted by boncho
reply to post by 8ILlBILl8






Continue to grow where??





In your gut, how does bacteria produce if their is no DNA, OR if their is no DNA is the bacteria that is produced have the same DNA as the genetically modified Bacillus subtilis.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by 8ILlBILl8

Originally posted by boncho
reply to post by 8ILlBILl8






Continue to grow where??





In your gut, how does bacteria produce if their is no DNA, OR if their is no DNA is the bacteria that is produced have the same DNA as the genetically modified Bacillus subtilis.


I think you missing the fact that this is an industrial process to produce a chemical (vitamin).... The bacteria is washed away from the final product (purified), there is no more bacteria.

Is this clear?

The best thing I could relate it to would be chemical synthesis, where reagents are put into solvents, a chemical reaction occurs, and the desired product needs to be purified from the remaining reagent and solvents through evaporation, washing or other methods.

In the case of biosynthesis, the reagent is the bacteria, and they are purified from the end product.


Does this make sense?

edit on 27-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)



edit on 27-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2011 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by boncho

Originally posted by 8ILlBILl8

Originally posted by boncho
reply to post by 8ILlBILl8






Continue to grow where??





In your gut, how does bacteria produce if their is no DNA, OR if their is no DNA is the bacteria that is produced have the same DNA as the genetically modified Bacillus subtilis.


I think you missing the fact that this is an industrial process to produce a chemical (vitamin).... The bacteria is washed away from the final product (purified), there is no more bacteria.

Is this clear?

The best thing I could relate it to would be chemical synthesis, where reagents are put into solvents, a chemical reaction occurs, and the desired product needs to be purified from the remaining reagent and solvents through evaporation, washing or other methods.

In the case of biosynthesis, the reagent is the bacteria, and they are purified from the end product.


Does this make sense?

edit on 27-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)



edit on 27-9-2011 by boncho because: (no reason given)


I do not think you understand. It produces bacteria in your gut, all of the bactria maybe gone by the time you put in your mouth but when it gets to your intestine it produces bacteria. GMO foods are known for producing GMO bacteria in your gut.



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