Homemade Toothpaste

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posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 05:30 AM
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reply to post by Seektruthalways1
 


Now that would be telling all my secrets wouldn't it?
Ok, I'll tell you, I'm on the African continent. How's that? Does that help?

Yes, one could order online, but it's not always a practical option, as you said, make it and we know exactly what is in there, but also because the currencies are different, so we'd end up paying more, depending on where we are. As I mentioned to another poster, take the amount of the product in dollars online, and multiply it by say 10 and you get more or less an idea of the difference in price. Then we have to hope that the package doesn't go missing.

So I created this thread for others like me who needs options, and those who would rather just make it, I understand that toothpaste without fluoride in the states is already more expensive. Which doesn't make sense, because if you look at my ingredients there, it should be much much cheaper than your average fluoride toothpaste.

Thanks for replying, I'm glad you're enjoying the thread




posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 05:36 AM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


I know the charcoal that you are talking about, the hospital gave it to me when my appendix burst. They also use it for people who had O.D.'d. You could use the charcoal, as I said, I like to use a paste effect in my mouth. Bicarb is not really that abrasive, we've been using it for months, and we haven't had any problems with over sensitive teeth. You just need to use a soft brush and not a hard brush, and it's fine.

Many people think that bicarb is too abrasive though, I think it's because people were using it too harshly. To make sure I'm on the safe side, if you read the original recipe from Tammy, then you'll see I don't use the 3 spoons bicarb, I took it down to 2, to be on the safe side and it's fine.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 05:39 AM
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reply to post by Aceofclubs
 


Oh ok, well here it is definitely the same thing.
So everybody in the U.K. make sure you are buying bicarb it should say it on the container as bicarbonate of soda. We only have this, we don't have another one that is different.

I'm glad you're enjoying the thread, thanks for your input, much appreciated.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 06:04 AM
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reply to post by andru
 


That's fantastic news! It seems to be good for you overall, from your teeth to osteoporosis, to fighting bad bacteria like strep. But what about what this article has to say on it? Xylitol good or bad?

Here's one mentioning some Digestiv e issues

So it comes down to people need to try it for themselves and see how their bodies accept it. I haven't seen Xylitol in our stores anywhere, but I'll take a look around, i might be an option. Thanks for the tip
Much appreciated
edit on 27-9-2011 by Pixie777 because: I don't know why it's making a space between the 'v' and the 'e' in digestive it's not that way on the original post ?



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 06:07 AM
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reply to post by Robynpainter
 


You're welcome, man
(Don't mind me, I'm just messing with you
)

I'm glad you are enjoying the thread, thanks for replying and letting me know



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 06:20 AM
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reply to post by gunshooter
 


Yip, some people add salt to it as well, that's personal choice though, and it's a good recipe.
thanks for the input. People need to know that even in dire straights, there are plenty of options available to keep their mouths clean. I'm just wondering, why would campers have peppermint oil with them? Or are there other uses for peppermint oil while camping? It's quite possible, peppermint oil is very versatile.

According to my book: The encyclopedia of essential oil by Julia Lawless:

Can be used for:
acne, dermatitis, ringworm, scabies, toothache, neuralgia, muscular pain, palpitations, asthma, bronchitis, halitosis, sinusitis, spasmodic cough (when inhaled), head colds, bronchitis, antispasmodic, colic, cramp, dyspepsia, flatulence, nausea, fevers, fainting, headache, mental fatigue, migraine, nervous stress, vertigo and can be used to fragrance things. The only warning is possible sensitization due to menthol.

There you go, now you have tons of other stuff you can use it for while camping, in addition to making yourself a paste to brush your teeth with


Thanks for the S&F and I'm glad you enjoying the thread.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 06:26 AM
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reply to post by star in a jar
 


Yes, but only if you brush too hard or use a hard brush. Which is exactly why I pointed out to use a soft brush.

As I said, we've been using it for a few months now, and haven't had any problems whatsoever
and there are 2 kids in that equation who would be more likely to brush wrong or too hard. So from my experience, it's quite fine, so don't worry too much about the abrasive factor, it's not that abrasive.

Thanks for the input,



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 06:30 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Your dad sounds like a great guy, trying to make sure that come what may, you'll be ok.

If you want to try it, adjust it to any way to fit your liking, if you prefer using straight bicarb, as the above poster mentioned, don't use too much, and use a soft brush. Try it, I'm sure you'll be pleasantly surprised by the results



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 08:46 AM
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reply to post by Pixie777
 


I think they just had a standard type that they used for everyone...I'm sure if we had brought her some they'd have let her use it, but none of us (including my grandmother) realized she'd suddenly get a bunch of cavities after switching....she just used the baking soda because she liked it better (as do I) than that nasty minty paste


No offense...we all like what we like, but personally me and her both hated minty foamy stuff the first thing when we woke up! I can think of few things less appealing...



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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Interesting thread. I am with you in wanting a "paste" to brush my teeth with.

Here in Canada we have lots of choices of toothpaste without fluoride but some of them are downright unpalatable. They just feel wrong in the mouth.


I've found one recently that has just the right feel, but it is expensive. There is a recipe on Dom's Kefir sight for home made toothpaste that does use ashes, but that just seemed like too much work -- burning the wood and collecting the ash to make what probably is lye.

My dentist recommends using equal parts of baking soda an salt, but I hat the taste of baking soda. Good thing I finally found something over the counter. Sometimes the extra $ is just unavoidable.

Thanks for sharing your story and info.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by wayno
 


Yes, some people have a very real aversion to the salty taste, I don't mind so much, we're not so fond of sweet stuff rather
but it's ok, you know? Everybody has different tastes. I'm glad you managed to find something you like, too bad about the price tag. Like I mentioned earlier, the fact that the ingredients are cheaper, and less, should make it cheaper, not more expensive.

Thanks for your reply
glad you like the thread



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by bhornbuckle75
 


We like a salty taste better than sweet taste as well
so I'm taking offence, everybody has their own tastes, and some people will have a problem with the salty taste and that's ok, that's why xylitol will be great for them, to work against the salty taste and still be able to clean their mouths with something sweeter



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by Pixie777
reply to post by andru
 


That's fantastic news! It seems to be good for you overall, from your teeth to osteoporosis, to fighting bad bacteria like strep. But what about what this article has to say on it? Xylitol good or bad?

Here's one mentioning some Digestiv e issues

So it comes down to people need to try it for themselves and see how their bodies accept it. I haven't seen Xylitol in our stores anywhere, but I'll take a look around, i might be an option. Thanks for the tip
Much appreciated
edit on 27-9-2011 by Pixie777 because: I don't know why it's making a space between the 'v' and the 'e' in digestive it's not that way on the original post ?


Glad you found it useful! After looking at both articles, I still believe Xylitol is a good choice.


But what about xylitol? Sorry, but Rami says it’s a no go.

“… this industrial product is just not necessary. Nature has provided us with many wholesome sweeteners that can be used in moderation without adverse effects in the context of a diet of nutrient-dense traditional foods.”

Bottom line: stick to maple syrup, raw honey, rapadura, palm sugar, and stevia.


Not really much of a case against it imo. The second article is a bit more informative however.



Of the sugar alcohols, many notorious for unpleasant intestinal side effects, probably erythritol (sold as Z Sweet) and xylitol (sold under a variety of names and in bulk bags in many health food stores) have the fewest of these side effects, if used in moderation.

...

Xylitol: A sugar alcohol, derived from xylan (a complex sugar chain, sort of like cellulose, which is found in corncobs, straw, almond shells and birch bark) which is then broken down into individual units of a simple sugar, called xylose, which are then hydrogenated to make xylitol. Positives are that its sweetness is exactly equal to sugar (but only half the calories) and so measures exactly like sugar, spoon for spoon, making for easy recipe conversion. Additionally, there are a pretty good number of research studies that point to its actually being of some health benefit for preventing cavities and ear infections in children.

Drawbacks: Users have reported the typical intestinal side effects of sugar alcohols, such as gas, bloating, rumbling and diarrhea, although some people aver having less misery with it than with other sugar alcohols, except, perhaps, erythritol. Additionally, some users perceive a slight cold, faintly metallic quality to its taste, although other people describe it as a clean taste. Once only found in chewing gum, it’s now being manufactured in bulk and in individual single-serving packets. If you tolerate using it, and many people do, it’s probably among the least offensive of the sugar alcohols.


What I take from this, it is of course still a sweetener, but appears to be a far better choice than some of the alternatives.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by andru
 


What happened to my reply? I got a security error and it's gone, weird ... I am having major hassles with my internet connection, I'm down to fluctuating 40 - 70%, must be the solar flares ?
Now I have to re-write the whole thing.

What I was saying was that I actually agree with you. Seems that the only problems that it could cause in some individuals, is some digestive problems. At the end of the day, try it, if all goes well, great! You've got yourself a good and healthy sweetener


The first article promotes stevia, hence I'm a bit skittish, as I said in my OP, I can't figure out whether natural fluoride is good or bad.

Personally, I don't mind the salty paste, I prefer it, the only place that I like a tad of sweetness is in my tea, and for that I just use a bit of honey. I do recognise however, that many people have a sweet tooth, and would prefer to sweeten the paste a bit, for them I would suggest to try the Xylitol



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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haha true, some people do love their sugar. I do still require my tea somewhat sweet, and honey from my understanding isn't so bad. I love my chai tea, (mine has over 20 spices and herbs in it). However I recently found out green and black tea have a good amount of fluoride in them, and because of this I may be turning to tea extracts which do not contain fluoride.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 10:15 PM
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I wouldn't worry about a little naturally occurring fluoride; especially since its probably in the context of a balance of different elements. Its the heavy doses in artificial products that one need worry about.

There are a gazillion things that in abundance might be harmful, but in the micro amounts that occur naturally in food, might even be good for us. If we knew every thing there is to know about what is in all of our food we could get really confused and worried unnecessarily. Humans have gotten thru the millenia of our existence without knowing the specifics and we got here just fine.

I say don't worry too much about something that is natural. Worry about the stuff that comes out of factories. The sad part is that so much of what we eat today does in fact come out of a factory. So does all the stuff we use as cosmetics our toiletries. I think that we should avoid factory made stuff in that department too; that is why this thread has merit.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by andru
 


Or you could just try some rooibos
I drink rooibos tea, and it's great with honey, and very good for you.


When my son was a baby, and allergic to milk, he was on rooibos in place of milk, and I never had problems with him with colic or anything that babies sometimes come down with. Try it, you may just like it. You can drink it with milk or without, my gran used to drink hers with a slice of lemon, and of course honey if you prefer a bit a sweetness.



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by wayno
 


That's true, I didn't think of that, you know how it is, you look so deep for the answers, that you miss it completely because it's right in your face. Of course, if it's natural it's fine
Thanks



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by seedofchucky
 


No, it's pointless. 9/10 dentists brush with straight baking soda. It actually kills plaque, which is something that toothpaste doesn't do. It's the only ingredient that actually matters.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by Thestargateisreal
 


Yip, exactly


Thanks for taking part of the conversation.





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