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The Execution of Troy Davis- from the Prison Grounds

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posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 11:21 PM
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I stumbled across a really great blog from a person who was at the prison grounds durring the demonstration in support of a fair trial for Troy Davis

I wanted to share it with more people, so here you go:




When I started reading about the Troy Davis case, I wanted to get closer to it mainly because it was happening relatively close to where I live and I’m the sort of person who needs to see things up close and personal. So, with the aforementioned help of my readers, I gassed up the car and headed down to the Georgia Diagnostic Prison to lend my voice to those trying to halt the execution of Troy Davis.

The drive was nice, something about coming out of the mountains and through the rolling hills of Northern Georgia always relaxes me. Even the traffic through Atlanta wasn’t at the standstill that it normally is. When I arrived in Jackson, I followed some cars down a small road across the street from the prison and ended up in the parking lot of the Towaliga County Line Baptist Church. As I got out of my car, I felt like I was going to be intruding. I asked two heavy-set black women standing at the door if I could come in, one of them smiled and took my hand, honey this is the church, she said, you always welcome here.


jasonbugg.com...

jasonbugg.com...
edit on 24-9-2011 by ARealandTrueAmerican because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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Mods please feel free to move if this is the wrong forum, although, personally, I think the death penalty is Madness.



posted on Sep, 25 2011 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by ARealandTrueAmerican
Mods please feel free to move if this is the wrong forum, although, personally, I think the death penalty is Madness.

I agree, that the death penalty is absolute Madness, nobody should have to be killed. As I was taught death at times is merciful, better than sitting in a prison. Let them die in jail, not kill them. I wish these American's would learn that.



posted on Sep, 25 2011 @ 01:12 AM
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Originally posted by Heartisblack

Originally posted by ARealandTrueAmerican
Mods please feel free to move if this is the wrong forum, although, personally, I think the death penalty is Madness.

I agree, that the death penalty is absolute Madness, nobody should have to be killed. As I was taught death at times is merciful, better than sitting in a prison. Let them die in jail, not kill them. I wish these American's would learn that.


That's an interesting argument. Death may indeed be the more humane form of punishment than rotting in prison- but all those that should be dead for criminal murder are costing ME money to keep alive. And BIG money. It is a known fact that capital punishment cases cost the taxpayers millions. WAY more than non capital cases. But I didn't commit their crimes, and I shouldn't have to pay to keep them alive. Clearly things just didn't work out on this planet for the fools that commit criminal murder. So get them off it ASAP so the rest of us can live peacefully and economically.

ETA: and oh, way to choose a username OP!

edit on Sun Sep 25th 2011 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2011 @ 05:24 PM
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I can't tell you how much that the civilized world looks down upon America and it's barbaric justice system. The death penalty is in the same line of thought as stoning someone to death or beheading someone. This blog post further highlights the underlying issues of racism in America.

The whole world has watched the outcome of this case and has judged America based upon it. I can't tell you how much, as an international observer of America how despicable not only racism is in America, but how faulty the American justice system is.

The international community is already aware that the U.S. has the highest incarceration rates from all around the world, and disproportionately arrests and incarcerates African Americans. Perhaps to some white Americans, slavery was not enough. Perhaps to racist America, the perpetuation of genocide against non-whites must continue on with policies that work against minorities and the poor. Perhaps they do this to ensure that people have no choice but to steal, sell drugs and defend their own lives with guns to survive. This is the heart of the problem in America.

While on the surface level, there are plenty of programs that help out the poor and minorities they are merely gestures that do not solve the real issue. In my own opinion, everyone who lives in a lower income neighborhood should simply be given a free college or university education so that no one has an excuse to commit crime. Crime is an issue of poverty. None the less, shame on racist America for subtly promoting racism against the African American community.

And people wonder why there's people saying things like "God damn America" , well these are the reasons why. Let alone how the international community can recognize the oppression when America doesn't even have the largest population in the world, yet has the highest incarceration rates. This is purely an issue of a faulty justice system, a media industry that promotes violence and crime, and policies that disregard the poor and minorities. While I don't agree with the phrase God damn America , simply because there are plenty of good Americans, I think it would be more accurate to say "God damn Racist and hateful Americans"



posted on Sep, 25 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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The thing that strikes me about this case is that he didnt really get a fair trial. It's an example of why the death penalty isnt a good idea, but mainly, I think this guy just needed to get a fair trial.

eTA: Anyone who looks at the issues surrounding Troy Davis' 'trial' would have to admit that it has many peculiar irregularities and inconsistencies. Witnesses likely coerced, changing testimony, etc. (that is, anyone who actually LOOKS at the case)

Even if you agree with the idea of the State having the authority to kill people, the real issue in relation to this case was, I believe, trying to see the guy get a fair trial in the first place.

Regardless, the guy is dead now. But I found this person's account of his experience there, in the closed in 'Free Speech Zone", surrounded by the family of the man about to be executed by the state, and people who supported his case, many walls are broken down. It's a poignant testimony to the sort of societal change we must all undergo in order to achieve the 'movement' so many want to enjoy the fruits of.




Vizion was a badass. He knew how to read the crowd and made a point to remind everyone that what people expected out of a crowd was anarchy and unruliness. If he sensed tension from a group of people in a certain section of the holding area, he gathered them together and told them stories about Christ, Gandhi or Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., he clapped his hands, he danced. He stood on a picnic table and he prayed. He personally thanked and shook hands with or hugged everyone there at least a bazillion times, and was still quick with a smile, story or joke when things felt somber. The cops worried that this small group of people praying and singing would get out of control, but at the center of it each time stood Vizion in his red polo shirt keeping the storm maintained.

As it drew closer to the scheduled seven o’clock execution, the crowd grew quieter. Vizion attempted to keep spirits high, and I still was nervous. The entire thing was pretty scary. I spoke with a few people and we just talked about how unfair the death penalty was, about how it is disproportionately used on African-Americans and how race and class were so intertwined in this country that a person can’t talk about one without the other. At times it felt absolutely dismal, but then at other times I realized that we were Americans assembling peacefully to protest something that the government is doing that we think is unjust. Most of the people around me were legally considered less than human years ago and yet here they are, peacefully and still actively disagreeing with the state while the whole world was watching.

Here I was, a non-believing white man whose parents through away drinking glasses that black visitors to our house drank out of holding hands and praying with black people. There is hope all around us. America always moves forward and progresses. Sometimes it’s painful and it feels like we’ll never shake the dull grey sheet of this world from atop of us and see the light and love that is humanity, but I was surrounded by progress and hope.




edit on 25-9-2011 by ARealandTrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2011 @ 08:48 PM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
Death may indeed be the more humane form of punishment than rotting in prison- but all those that should be dead for criminal murder are costing ME money to keep alive. And BIG money. It is a known fact that capital punishment cases cost the taxpayers millions. WAY more than non capital cases. But I didn't commit their crimes, and I shouldn't have to pay to keep them alive.


But you dont mind paying to kill them? That seems more like a bloodlust than a fiscal concern. seeing as you are admitting it will cost more of 'your money' to kill him than keep him alive.

I cant say I am necessarily opposed to it in every instance. But something about the State having the right to take someone's life, when we all know how systematically flawed the 'justice system' is seems stupid, shortsighted, and dangerous.

I've always found that melding of social and fiscal conservatism to be quite funny. We dont trust the state, but we are willing to give them the right to kill? Even when we know their judgements are often flawed, skewed in the favor of the rich and powerful??



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 01:56 AM
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Originally posted by ARealandTrueAmerican
We dont trust the state, but we are willing to give them the right to kill? Even when we know their judgements are often flawed, skewed in the favor of the rich and powerful??


Then who else is there? Who else should have the right to make sure the victim is avenged? The state, with all it's trials, attorneys, investigators, and everything else is the best society has offered up. The fact that the system sucks and is somewhat corrupt in its present form is another issue.

I don't think true justice will ever be served to society 100% of the time with any system. I just want to be sure true justice (death) is served to those that take a life criminally- 100% of the time. Society can afford no less. You kill- you die- unless in a clear case of self defense.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 02:25 AM
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reply to post by TrueAmerican
 


If Britain had maintained the death penalty the sentencing of the Guildford 4 and Birmingham 6 would have been entirely different, while their deaths may have given the victims families and society a sense of vengeance, those convicted where all ultimately innocent and part of a web of lies woven by the police.

So in my mind those cases highlight the risks of executing the innocent and as such will always stand opposed to the death penalty.

I would ask and this is not meant to be mean spirited, but given you accept the system is not 100% perfect are you ok with accepting even 1% of even 0.5% of those put to death are innocent?



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 08:09 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican

Originally posted by ARealandTrueAmerican
We dont trust the state, but we are willing to give them the right to kill? Even when we know their judgements are often flawed, skewed in the favor of the rich and powerful??


Then who else is there? Who else should have the right to make sure the victim is avenged? The state, with all it's trials, attorneys, investigators, and everything else is the best society has offered up. The fact that the system sucks and is somewhat corrupt in its present form is another issue.


No, it is not a 'separate issue'. The State can be shown to have a track record of incorrect verdicts, often politically motivated.


I don't think true justice will ever be served to society 100% of the time with any system. I just want to be sure true justice (death) is served to those that take a life criminally-


I dont think you know what 'justice' means. Are you a Liberal? Because the notion the State can dispense murder as 'true justice' imples a LOT of faith in the State.



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