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The American Mosin Nagant

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posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 03:12 AM
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It was J.C. Higgins and the changed to Ted Williams and finally to Sears.. They had a mess of brands that were made by manufacturers like Vespa and Puch scooters and motorcycles sold as Allstate and numerous musical instruments, radios and TVs sold under the name Silvertone... One thing I like about old military firearms is that they are classified as "war relics" by the ATF and considered collectibles...A nice M-1 Garrand that sold for around $80 in 1963 can bring over $1500 with all of the accessories as will Browning Hi Power pistols that were made by John Inglis of Canada ( Whirlpool of Canada) for the Chinese Army and equipped with rifle type rear sights and a removable shoulder stock that doubled as a holster...Weapons like these are great for home protection or hunting and are always increasing in value.. In a way they are a better investment than gold because there is always a market for them, especially when the NRA is squawking about how any Democrat in the White House is going to take your guns away from you.. Right now there are so many gun manufacturers cranking out new models it is difficult to keep up with all of them... Prices drop somewhat when there is a Republican in the White House so it is better to buy then unless there is something like the war on terror or impending martial law, starvation, and energy shortages being of threat on the mass media outlets, then prices climb... The Mosin Nagant rifles are very well made and easily maintained as well as being accurate enough to have won the 1000meter shooting competition in the 1960 winter Olympics...The ammunition is priced at about 30% less than the 30-06 rounds that was used by the US from 1906 on into the 1960s and beyond as a hunting round and in foreign military and guerrilla units supplied with Garrands and B.A.R.s, and it is as potent or more so.. The Mosin Nagant appears to be having a resurgence of popularity beyond what it has had in the past... I was looking in a catalog that has Monte Carlo type stocks,scope mounts,tactical tri-rails, broken shell extractors and stripper clips... That is a lot of stuff for a rifle that has been on the scene since the 19th century.




posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 11:53 AM
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reply to post by hypervigilant
 


J.C.Higgins and the Sears Ted Williams and all the rest of the early Box Store weapons were made by the various weapons companies like Mossberg, Marlin, H&R, Remington, Ithaca and others on contract.
As far a ammo for the 7.62X54. Wolf Ammunition makes non-corrosive, in 500 Rnd cases for about $179.00! That's pretty cheap for ammo that can take care of anything on the North American continent and won't corrode your favorite rifle!
Zindo
edit on 10/14/2011 by ZindoDoone because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 01:56 PM
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if you want a nice one go here:

www.budsgunshop.com...

they have good service and are well respected



posted on Oct, 14 2011 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by paratus
 

that one is nice. I like all the extras. I will keep mine, it is a little older than the 91/30. But these days, $109.00 is not a bad price..



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 09:36 AM
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I just bought a 1939 M91/30 Mosin (Izhevsk) the other day from my local shop. I've been looking for one for a while now and thought I'd have to order over the internet but walked in and there it was. I paid a heckuva lot more than $36 but still got a good deal since I didn't have to pay for shipping and transfer fee/background check. These are becoming fast sellers due to the price, accuracy and power. I plan on buying the 440 rd surplus tin just to have on hand but will most likely buy the non-corrosive rounds ($11 for 20rds) for the range.

Took me an entire day of cleaning and swabbing to get the Cosmoline out. Wife wouldn't let me stick the pieces in the oven to melt it out so I had to use a degreaser. I still need to get a .28 gauge bore brush to get the dried cosmoline out of the chamber. But, in my opinion, the work is well worth it! Can't wait to get this out to the range.

Still working on the bayonet so it will fit a little easier and not get stuck. Before taking it out, make sure you check the headspace. The gauges are fairly cheap and always good to have on hand. I bought mine through Okie Gauges. Also, you may have a "sticky bolt" the first few times you fire it due to dried cosmoline.



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 

Yea the $36.00 was over twenty years ago. Still a fun gun to shoot. It the "sticky bolt" problem does not go away, it could be the firing pin spring. It is an easy fix. Good shooting!!



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by oldshooter1979
 


Firing pin spring on a sticky bolt? That's a new one for me, can you explain? I know that a burr or dried cosmoline can cause it but never heard of that one. Again, I'm new to the Mosin so I'm sure there's a lot about this weapon that I don't know.

Thanks!



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 

This would help with the sticky bolt and creep. The only thing I used different, was the brush. I found that either a old .243 or even a 28ga bursh worked well. Sorry I should had explained better in my last post. If you have no problem with "creep" then leave the spring as is.Mosin sticky bolt and creep
www.youtube.com...
AGI had a great dvd on gunsmithing on the Mosin, I think it was around $39.00 Great to have when one is keeping these old rifles working. Have fun.



posted on Oct, 16 2011 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by oldshooter1979
 


Thanks for the You Tube video, watched both parts but I don't think I'm going to cut down the spring...just not that adventurous. Wondering exactly what type of brush to use and the best compound, hopefully my local gunshop sells it.

Right now I'm just waiting for my No Go Gauge to arrive to check the headspace, I'll polish the bore and take her out to the range. With any luck, I won't have too many problems.

Thanks again and I may be posting more questions on this thread.



posted on Oct, 17 2011 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 

The go-no go guages do come in handy. So far, (knock on wood) I have yet found one that had a head spacing problem. Have fun at the range




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