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I Want a Seismograph Waveform of the UARS Impact!

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posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 03:54 AM
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reply to post by Trexter Ziam
 


Man, wtf, that thing is headed straight for me in NC...


Maybe I should go out side....




posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 03:59 AM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
reply to post by Trexter Ziam
 


Man, wtf, that thing is headed straight for me in NC...


Maybe I should go out side....


Karma for your jest about the Japanese power plant.


I figure there will be several more revolutions before I get my 75. It gets closer each time; but, still no bananas.

P.S. I have a huge pile of these seismo pics saved and am about to clean house and mass delete. Which times (in Central, Eastern or GMT) do you want me to save?
edit on 24/9/2011 by Trexter Ziam because: PS



posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 04:05 AM
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True American must have not read this thread.

There will be no seismographic signature, there will probably not even be a crater, most debris will land about 100 mph, as one poster said earlier in the thread, terminal velocity of the various debris ranges from 40 mph to about 220 mph with most falling in the middle of those two extremes. Very un-climactic.



posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 04:18 AM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
True American must have not read this thread.

There will be no seismographic signature, there will probably not even be a crater, most debris will land about 100 mph, as one poster said earlier in the thread, terminal velocity of the various debris ranges from 40 mph to about 220 mph with most falling in the middle of those two extremes. Very un-climactic.


THIS, from an astronomer, does not sound like terminal velocity to me:


Astronomer Dr Ian Griffin, from the UK Association of Science and Discovery Centres, says the Earth's atmosphere slows down falling satellites a great deal.

He explained that what remains of UARS will hit the ground relatively slowly and 'certainly not at orbital velocity of 17,500mph'.

Much of any satellite crashing to Earth will be disintegrated by heat, caused by friction with the atmosphere. It's the reason we get shooting stars - created by meteors burning up in the upper atmosphere. UARS is large enough, though, that up to half a ton will strike the ground. It will probably not be in one piece, however: space vehicles experience incredible stress on re-entry. The load can be as much as 10Gs. An F1 car experiences around 5Gs with maximum braking from high speed.

The reason why the location of the crash site is so hard to predict is because the density of the atmosphere varies so greatly higher up, producing different amounts of drag.

A prediction that was wrong by even a few minutes would mean the satellite landing a huge distance away, owing to its speed.


www.dailymail.co.uk...

It more sounds like that thing will be booking it, maybe not at 17,500 mph, but a good 5000 anyway...



posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 04:21 AM
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It already landed in the Pacific Ocean over 4 hours ago.

Update #15
Sat, 24 Sep 2011 03:46:42 AM EDT

NASA’s decommissioned Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite fell back to Earth between 11:23 p.m. EDT Friday, Sept. 23 and 1:09 a.m. EDT Sept. 24. The Joint Space Operations Center at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California said the satellite penetrated the atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean. The precise re-entry time and location are not yet known with certainty.

NASA.gov

A reentry duration of an hour and a half suggests extreme slowing.
edit on 24-9-2011 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 05:50 AM
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Okay, the debris trail (presuming that's what the feed is tracking) went directly over my place and I saw nothing at all except a falling star going a different direction. No fireworks at all. Nothing like what I saw a day and a half ago.

The next pass of Indonesia should hit YOUR magic number (122) but not mine. I figure another 2-3 rounds before I get my happy number.

So, in concluding, you got your Fiji shot ... and I'll delete all these (hundreds or thousands) I have except for the batch where I lost the feed and they started the decay sequence.



posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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Update #16
Sat, 24 Sep 2011 10:37:25 AM CDT


NASA’s decommissioned Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite fell back to Earth between 11:23 p.m. EDT Friday, Sept. 23 and 1:09 a.m. EDT Sept. 24. The Joint Space Operations Center at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California said the satellite entered the atmosphere over the North Pacific Ocean, off the west coast of the United States. The precise re-entry time and location of any debris impacts are still being determined. NASA is not aware of any reports of injury or property damage.



This is your source for official information on the re-entry of UARS. All information posted here has been verified with a government agency or law enforcement.



NASA will conduct a media telecon at 2 p.m. ET to discuss the re-entry. The telecon will be streamed live at www.nasa.gov/newsaudio.


I also have more goodies but won't be posting them
You're missing out.




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