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How well did the earth spin in the Pangaea times?

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posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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First off moderators i am not sure where to put this i just thought it would be interesting to get others take on this subject

Ok thinking minds here a couple questions that has baffled me for a long time now

If you take all the landmass's on the planet and smash them all together critical thinking would lead you to believe the distribution of all that weight on one side should have made for a nasty wobble
Time in relation to the earths rotation if the earth had a nasty wobble how long would a day been? how about season? Did the earth speed up and slow down on a consistent cycle like a free spinning wheel with a giant weight on one side or did the weight not effect anything at all?

what is gravity- no one can explain gravity properly a rotating object tend to throw things off its surface not attract them think about it we rotate at 1035 miles an hour at the equator want to do an experiment go put your car on a jack tape a washer to your tire and hit the gas guess what... the washer will fly off so fast its dangerous (please don't actually do this you could hurt yourself or others) you can throw in the centrifugal force theory but if you think it out the material in a centrifuge pull away from the point of rotation


I would like to see your ideas on this maybe i am way off base maybe i am an idiot but honestly i don't think the earths rotation was the same with the entire landmass based together. And what really causes us to stick to a rock spinning 1035 miles an hour

and how can time be consistent at the poles and equator since supposedly time is based on the rotation of the planet and the planets poles rotation is almost zero and the equators speed is 1035 how does time move at all at the poles since there is no rotation.




posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:13 PM
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doesn't the earth already wobble?

i only made this post so i could legitimately use the word wobble.

wobble wobble wobble.


edit on 23-9-2011 by Beavers because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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I would also keep in mind that yes the land mass being connected carried a weight / electromagnetisim that could suggest top heavy effects on the sphere. But the water also made up for weight / electromagnetisim as well and could of caused simular effects. Good question

edit on 9/23/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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Water weighs more then land therefore, the weight of land is inconsequential.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


LOL wobble but yes we wobble slightly but im interested in how bad the wobble was way back then



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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Water weighs more then land, therefore, the weight of land is inconsequential.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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Its not the earth spinning that creates gravity, mass creates gravity the only reason our earth spins is because its orbiting a star, we call it the sun.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by libertytoall
 


ok then so rephrase my question how bad would the earth wobble with all the water on one side and new question how bad did the tides effect the wobble



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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i guess it depend on how the centre works too.

i could be (and probably am) entirely wrong, but i always assumed that the mass would increase the closer you got to the centre, because of gravity

with a greater mass in the centre, the crust might not effect the outside much at all?



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by roughycannon
 


well at what point does the speed of rotation null the effect of the mass? a particle of dust on a speeding tire will not stay put how do we?



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by Immune
 

The water would of had omni effects due to it being on all sides of land. Also the earth is not a complete perfect circle/sphere so the more elongated part of Earth below water could of effected as well since it protrudes outward more..



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by Immune
 


did we have a moon during that period?

there may have been no tide otherwise.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by Immune
 


well that's just it... the speed of rotation doesn't effect the gravity at all.

if it did, with the earth spinning "a few g's" (topical other-thread humour) you'd move a massive distance every time you jumped upwards!



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by Immune
 


I always think, even though scientists continue to stick to this claim, its never really quite made sense to me, why would it all be one large land mass at all?

www.youtube.com...

Dont mind who the maker is, and what hes done in the past... i think he speaks quite alot of facts that cannot be overlooked. have a look at the full video.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:23 PM
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edit on 9/23/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by Immune
 


If our earth stopped spinning it wouldnt effect anything, infact our earth is slowing down all the time and will eventually stop in the future, like our moon which spun at one point but now is locked in facing us.

If humans are still around when the earth stops spinning nothing will happen people will still walk around as normal as it the earths mass that creates gravity, the only difference would be that 1 side of the planet will be in permanent daylight and the other night.

The earths spin is a result of it forming and orbiting the sun.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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wow good question no idea if we had a moon so i looked it up
en.wikipedia.org...
looks like we did i wonder how high the tides were in pangeae



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by Immune
reply to post by roughycannon
 


well at what point does the speed of rotation null the effect of the mass? a particle of dust on a speeding tire will not stay put how do we?


Gravity is all about mass. Anything with mass has gravity....you, the chair you sit on, the tree outside your house and the grain of sand on the beach. But since our mass is much much less then that of the earth we "fall towards its center" in a way, but the ground is there at least to stop us lol

Heres some stuff I found on gravity:


Gravity goes with mass. Everything that has mass also has gravity. The gravity is proportional to the mass, so if the mass increases by a certain factor then the gravity also increases by the same factor. So, gravity does not come just from planets. Gravity belongs with everything that has mass, so it also belongs with you. However, the gravity that you generate is very much weaker than the gravity that a planet generates, and is also very much weaker than the electromagnetic forces that determine the characteristics of all things around us (except for radioactivity), so usually you do not notice that things on Earth also generate gravity. Albert Einstein has taught us that space and time are interwoven, so that how long something is or how long something lasts is not the same for everyone even if everyone has perfect measuring devices. Those kinds of effects are only important for things that go almost as fast as light. For example, some very fast cosmic rays can get down to fairly low in the atmosphere because for them time goes slower, because of their very great speed (or, according to them, that the atmosphere is thinner) and it takes longer (according to their clock) for them to fall apart than it would for similar but slower cosmic rays.
Space-time (the combination of space and time) is curved by nearby mass, just like a heavy ball makes a dent if you put it on a stretched rubber sheet. We notice curvature of space-time as gravity. If you roll a marble across the rubber, then the marble will deviate from a straight course because of the dent, just as if the marble is attracted by the ball that makes the dent, but really the marble deviates only because the narrow strip of rubber that it rolls along is not level, whether that is caused by the nearby ball or by something else. In the same way, it appears as if the Earth's gravity pulls at the Moon and so keeps it in an orbit around the Earth, but really the Moon is kept from following a straight path because space-time on her path is not flat, which is due to the presence of the Earth. So, nothing special happens in a planet for it to generate gravity. You can notice the gravity of a planet only because it has such a very large mass.


Gravity

So its not the spin its the mass.....all about mass.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


Yes, there was a Moon else, like you say, there would be no tides to speak of and with no tides how would tidal creatures have survived? And there was plenty of littoral life in those days.

The Earth did spin slightly faster than now - the Moon is slowing it down. Around 600ma (long before Pangea formed) there were ~400 days in a year because the earth rotated faster.

The process is known as tidal acceleration

I guess around the time of Pangea (say ~250ma) there would have been around 380 days in a year?



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by Essan
 


Awesome thanks for answering that question




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