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UARS Satellite - why does it have to fall?

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posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by ZIPMATT
 


If it's a 1 in 3200 chance that one person will be hit, then the chance of anybody at all being hit is 1 in (3200 x the world's population), which is 3200 x 6.7 billion, or 21.44 trillion.
edit on 23-9-2011 by CLPrime because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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They won't destroy it in space because of the debris. It would pose a threat to everything in or near it's orbital regime.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by atoptreetops

Originally posted by FraternitasSaturni
You know that it carries data that has to be recovered right?


Wrong. It's dead, it has no power to it. It's a piece of space junk soon to be earth junk.


Its not my words... its nasa's. Nasa said they wanted all the pieces back to gather data... and because some components may be hazardous like the propellant tanks (which can contain toxic hydrazine), but hell, what do they know right? I better believe in someone else in some forum that tells me otherwise...



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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Gravity is what brings these satellites back to earth. All have a fuel source that is used to maintain their orbit. This ones fuel is gone, and therefore no longer has the power necessary to maintain orbit. Once the power is gone, gravity takes over.

Thinking about the odds of one piece hitting someone, for me, is similar to getting hit by a meteor. Meteors fall to earth on a regular basis, but I dont walk around fearful one will hit me. I guess it is possible, but so unlikely, why worry?

On a side note, shooting it down with a missile would cost many many millions of dollars(or more) AND create additional safety risks. What if it misfires or strays or creates new debris?......I think this would be an expensive and risky decision compared to the minimal risk posed by the satellites re-entry.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 01:31 PM
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I hope it lands in china.
then they will never get it back.
they are ideots to just drop it at random.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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It would create thousands of smaller pieces of debris like the Chinese test did, which are dangerous to shuttles or anything else travelling at high speed




 
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