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R.I.P. TROY DAVIS AN INNOCENT MAN

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posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 10:55 PM
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I am all for capitol punishment however it does sting to see an actual innocent man be killed because of an unjust "justice" system. Any how rest in peace brother, Im sorry we failed you.
www.msnbc.msn.com...
edit on 21-9-2011 by AllUrChips because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 10:57 PM
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The thing is that he could have been guilty, and the amount of supposed questionability in this case should have gotten him out of jail, let alone out of being killed.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 10:57 PM
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posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:10 PM
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justice was served....as far as i am concerned the man payed his debt may he rest in peace...and hope we find a way to fix the broken system we rely on to protect us.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:15 PM
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I'm no fan of Ann Coulter, not by a long shot; but if what she wrote on this matter has any basis in fact, Davis deserved to die.

34 people, many of them his friends and ALL black, identified Davis as the man who stood over the body of a police officer he had just shot and coldly ended his life - smiling all the while.

7 of the jurors were black and not only did they find Davis guilty, it was the JURY and not the judge who sentenced him to death. Apparently they thought he deserved it too.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by thisisnotaname
 


an eye for an eye leaves us all blind.

Its funny how the christian right rally for the death penalty, Ive never understood that.

You don't take the old testament rules over the new, you know the part about forgiveness and all that.

The whole if you even look at another with hate you are guilty of murder thing.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:25 PM
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I've followed this case very closely from the UK, and I honestly bawled my eyes out when they announced on the news that he hadn't been granted a stay of execution.
4 hours he was lying on a gurney with an IV in his arm, still maintaining calmly that he was innocent.
Was he innocent? I don't know. Neither does anyone else. And certainly, and most importantly IMHO neither did Georgia.
And that is the problem. Why have a death penalty, if you can't prove 100% that someone is guilty.
And by 100% I mean DNA solid evidence type proof.

We aren't animals anymore.
We are quick to condemn those countries that stone people, and whip people, but is this any different? Really?
Two wrongs will never, ever make it right.
McPhails family smiled as Troy Davis died, will his death suddenly make everything okay?
Will they wake up tomorrow with light hearts and the murder of their family member fading? no. No they wont.
I don't agree with any executions, call me a bleeding heart liberal ****, I don't really care.

I hope the justice system looks very long, and very carefully into this.
Whatever happens, guilty or otherwise, a man was killed tonight.
If he was guilty, I still don't think it's right. If he wasn't.. it doesn't bear thinking about.
I'm not sure if I was American, I would be particularly proud right now.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:28 PM
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Originally posted by Deplume
I've followed this case very closely from the UK, and I honestly bawled my eyes out when they announced on the news that he hadn't been granted a stay of execution.
4 hours he was lying on a gurney with an IV in his arm, still maintaining calmly that he was innocent.
Was he innocent? I don't know. Neither does anyone else. And certainly, and most importantly IMHO neither did Georgia.
And that is the problem. Why have a death penalty, if you can't prove 100% that someone is guilty.
And by 100% I mean DNA solid evidence type proof.

We aren't animals anymore.
We are quick to condemn those countries that stone people, and whip people, but is this any different? Really?
Two wrongs will never, ever make it right.
McPhails family smiled as Troy Davis died, will his death suddenly make everything okay?
Will they wake up tomorrow with light hearts and the murder of their family member fading? no. No they wont.
I don't agree with any executions, call me a bleeding heart liberal ****, I don't really care.

I hope the justice system looks very long, and very carefully into this.
Whatever happens, guilty or otherwise, a man was killed tonight.
If he was guilty, I still don't think it's right. If he wasn't.. it doesn't bear thinking about.
I'm not sure if I was American, I would be particularly proud right now.

Meanwhile we have OJ simpsons of the world getting away with murder because of their money just makes me sick!!!!!!!



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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Troy Davis speaks from death row



Made an example of him.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by OldCorp
 



hmmm, here is what I found in the local news buddy

Hundreds of thousands of people worldwide, including some from Australia, pleaded for clemency in the wake of a series of court appeals and with seven of nine witnesses having recanted their original testimony, some claiming to have been coerced by police.

No weapon, DNA evidence or surveillance footage was found to link Davis to the crime. His defence team pointed the finger at a second man who had been with Davis on that evening and who later became the prosecution's star witness.


Petitioners had included Pope Benedict, Nobel peace laureates Jimmy Carter and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a former FBI director and at least 40 members of the US Congress.

Davis's advocates had included Amnesty International and the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People, as well as the Innocence Project, which has helped exonerate 17 death-row inmates through DNA testing.



Read more: www.smh.com.au...



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by Highlander64
 


Yeah ann coulter is not the end all be all either I heard the same thing as you and to me he sounds innocent with ALOT of support imo



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 12:10 AM
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Innocent men don't run...

Especially before they're charged with anything.



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 12:25 AM
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For such a Christian" nation, as the U.S. supposedly is........remember when Obama gave a speech early in his presidency and he said the U.S. wasn't a Christian nation? And the howls from many sources about that declaration? Anyway, for such a "Christian" nation, we sure have a lot of people who call for the ancient eye for an eye crap. I wonder how many people cheered the death of Troy Davis? How many people got caught up in an orgasm of delight at the thought of this man being executed? Many, many, many.......



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by Highlander64
reply to post by OldCorp
 



hmmm, here is what I found in the local news buddy

Hundreds of thousands of people worldwide, including some from Australia, pleaded for clemency in the wake of a series of court appeals and with seven of nine witnesses having recanted their original testimony, some claiming to have been coerced by police.

No weapon, DNA evidence or surveillance footage was found to link Davis to the crime. His defence team pointed the finger at a second man who had been with Davis on that evening and who later became the prosecution's star witness.


Petitioners had included Pope Benedict, Nobel peace laureates Jimmy Carter and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a former FBI director and at least 40 members of the US Congress.

Davis's advocates had included Amnesty International and the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People, as well as the Innocence Project, which has helped exonerate 17 death-row inmates through DNA testing.



Read more: www.smh.com.au...


And that excuses him for standing over a police officer and coldbloodedly executing a husband and father that he had already shot once in front of 34 people?

Pfft.
edit on 9/22/2011 by OldCorp because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 04:04 AM
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Hang your head in shame, America. If there is 1 tiny ounce of doubt, then you can't kill a man. Blood lust and revenge, that's all it is. It has NOTHING to do with justice, nothing at all.


In 2007 the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles, the body which has the final say in the state on whether executions should go ahead, made a solemn promise. Troy Davis, the prisoner who is scheduled to die by lethal injection at 7pm local time on Wednesday, would never be put to death unless there was "no doubt" about his guilt. Here are 10 reasons why the board – which decided on Tuesday to allow the execution to go ahead – has failed to deliver on its promise and why a man who is very possibly innocent will be killed in the name of American justice. 1. Of the nine witnesses who appeared at Davis's 1991 trial who said they had seen Davis beating up a homeless man in a dispute over a bottle of beer and then shooting to death a police officer, Mark MacPhail, who was acting as a good samaritan, seven have since recanted their evidence. 2. One of those who recanted, Antoine Williams, subsequently revealed they had no idea who shot the officer and that they were illiterate – meaning they could not read the police statements that they had signed at the time of the murder in 1989. Others said they had falsely testified that they had overheard Davis confess to the murder. 3. Many of those who retracted their evidence said that they had been cajoled by police into testifying against Davis. Some said they had been threatened with being put on trial themselves if they did not co-operate. 4. Of the two of the nine key witnesses who have not changed their story publicly, one has kept silent for the past 20 years and refuses to talk, and the other is Sylvester Coles. Coles was the man who first came forward to police and implicated Davis as the killer. But over the past 20 years evidence has grown that Coles himself may be the gunman and that he was fingering Davis to save his own skin. 5. In total, nine people have come forward with evidence that implicates Coles. Most recently, on Monday the George Board of Pardons and Paroles heard from Quiana Glover who told the panel that in June 2009 she had heard Coles, who had been drinking heavily, confess to the murder of MacPhail. 6. Apart from the witness evidence, most of which has since been cast into doubt, there was no forensic evidence gathered that links Davis to the killing. 7. In particular, there is no DNA evidence of any sort. The human rights group the Constitution Project points out that three-quarters of those prisoners who have been exonerated and declared innocent in the US were convicted at least in part on the basis of faulty eyewitness testimony. 8. No gun was ever found connected to the murder. Coles later admitted that he owned the same type of .38-calibre gun that had delivered the fatal bullets, but that he had given it away to another man earlier on the night of the shooting. 9. Higher courts in the US have repeatedly refused to grant Davis a retrial on the grounds that he had failed to "prove his innocence". His supporters counter that where the ultimate penalty is at stake, it should be for the courts to be beyond any reasonable doubt of his guilt. 10. Even if you set aside the issue of Davis's innocence or guilt, the manner of his execution tonight is cruel and unnatural. If the execution goes ahead as expected, it would be the fourth scheduled execution date for this prisoner. In 2008 he was given a stay just 90 minutes before he was set to die. Experts in death row say such multiple experiences with imminent death is tantamount to torture.


www.guardian.co.uk...

Land of the freedom, democracy, kidnapping, imprisonment without trial, torture and execution.

No justice. Just hatred and vengance.



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 06:41 AM
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yep, this one is a marker, a point when we realize that america has completely lost it's way. This one hurts, because..you know, most of us know that america being for freedom and justice is a sham, we didn't need this case to show us that..but, there's something about the state just straight-up killing an innocent man..SCOTUS didn't stop it. POTUS didn't stop it. he could have pardoned him, there was ample evidence that a pardon was warranted, and, politically, considering the caliber of people who stepped forward on this man's behalf, Obama had all the cover in the world. What a weak, spineless, phony empty suit he turned out to be. See,troy davis can't be explained away as a policy decision; this isn't about political ideology. This, for Barack Obama, was a test of character.

He failed. Miserably.



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 07:15 AM
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reply to post by AllUrChips
 


RIP Troy Davis, when you do not find a gun at the scene, and there is no way to prove it, you are innocent until proven guilty.



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by AllUrChips
 


Get your facts straight on these cases people.

OJ got off because the local police force bungled some of the evidence that would of convicted OJ. The process worked perfectly. The evidence wasn't processed correctly, therefore it couldn't be used. Therefore OJ wasn't convicted.

We have a due process here. Whether we like how it works or not, you either have evidence or you dont. It SHOULD NEVER be emotionally based. It is BEYOND a reasonable doubt, not your knee jerk reaction.

There was barely any evidence for casey anthony. The process didn't fail there either.And they went for the highest prosecution instead of going for something lower. Prosecution can fully be blamed for that one.

A lot of the witnesses for the Troy case recanted their testimonies. There was only circumstantial evidence. There was not enough to convict him, much less murder him. This is the first case in a while that was convicted on no evidence.

In this country I would rather see a murderer go free for not having a due process or not enough evidence then someone innocent get killed because emotional reactions.

Look at all the people starting to be released because of DNA testing.



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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I was listening to a warden once being interviewed about a man that was rumored to have been falsely condemned. They asked the warden what he thought, and he said "one thing all prisoners have in common is they are all innocent and unjustly imprisoned, just ask them." Troy Davis claimed to be innocent to the end, what a shocker that a murderer is also capable of lying.



edit on 22-9-2011 by SavedOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Yes i agree with you, not like people would allow their bias to effect a case, we have due process, but unfortunately its run by people who are flawed. Mistakes are made, people are biased, Hell Im in so ca, my wife was just on a jury, she was disgusted by her other jurors because more than half gave the response of "Hes black he must of done it" in not those exact words (they said look at him he did it) that was by the end of the case when they deliberated

My wife said the evidence was all circumstantial, no one saw him do the crime, the stories of the prosecution witness (Cops) seems flimsy at best. She stood her ground and the case was proven not guiltily, she said if her and two other jurors had been so vocal about the bad evidence he would of gone to jail.

So yeah in a super liberal progressive state, racism and bias happen on juries, I can only imagine the south when a white cop is the victim, Not saying he didn't do it, but maybe the death penalty is not the best solution in such a flawed system.
edit on 22-9-2011 by benrl because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-9-2011 by benrl because: (no reason given)



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