Dowsing/Witching for water.... Yeah this is another crazy old man skill

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posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 08:56 AM
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reply to post by Thestargateisreal
 


There you go...
next stop the David Letter men show and the stupid people tricks segment...
let me know what night it airs so I can have the whole family up to watch




posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 09:10 AM
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This is purely speculative...but I think some people don't get it because they talk themselves out of it. To use "hippy" lingo..".they aren't in tune with nature, man."

Most people that interact with the earth on a regular basis and feel...literally touch the earth and it's elements, have a bind or tie to the soil, the trees, the weather...

I know people...and I bet others do to...that can tell the weather...even if it smacks into science and the forecasts by professionals..they know when it's gonna snow or when a storm is coming...even animals can detect a tsunami or earthquake...we have that "spirit" too...but many just refuse to hear it.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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I suggest all you dowsers do the test then....$1,000,000 for anyone that can prove it works


Its funny how no dowser can find a bottle of water under a box yet they claim they can find all sorts of other things...from gold, to oil....treasure etc.
Its all down to luck, chance, and coincidence.

Give me some dowsing rods and chances are il find water..."chances"....not because they actually work, but because we live on a water planet.

Ive seen other people do similar tests as the guy offering $1m....the outcome is always the same. The dowser will come up with a plethora of excuses as for why it never worked. "i wasnt wearing my lucky pants", "its too small amount of water", "i got up on the wrong side of the bed", blah blah blah nonsense.

If this really worked they could ditch the millions of £$ worth of equipment they currently use to locate metals, water, oil etc. Hire a dude to wander about looking for these things at very little cost.

Why arent dowsers all billionaires? Why cant they find oil fields in their spare time???




posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 09:46 AM
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Originally posted by loves a conspiricy
I suggest all you dowsers do the test then....$1,000,000 for anyone that can prove it works


Its funny how no dowser can find a bottle of water under a box yet they claim they can find all sorts of other things...from gold, to oil....treasure etc.
Its all down to luck, chance, and coincidence.

Give me some dowsing rods and chances are il find water..."chances"....not because they actually work, but because we live on a water planet.

Ive seen other people do similar tests as the guy offering $1m....the outcome is always the same. The dowser will come up with a plethora of excuses as for why it never worked. "i wasnt wearing my lucky pants", "its too small amount of water", "i got up on the wrong side of the bed", blah blah blah nonsense.

If this really worked they could ditch the millions of £$ worth of equipment they currently use to locate metals, water, oil etc. Hire a dude to wander about looking for these things at very little cost.

Why arent dowsers all billionaires? Why cant they find oil fields in their spare time???



Rani's contest is a fake.
It has rules and pre-tests no one can get past.

No one has ever even passed his " Qualifying" test to determine if they can take his "Challenge".

Randi is a showman, always has been always will be.




The second requirement will be that the applicant must provide an endorsement of an academic nature. That means some sort of validation from an appropriately-qualified academic....

Once these qualifications have been offered, we will follow up on them, asking for validation; we’ll require that the cited authorities verify that they did make such a statement about the applicant, or that they hold such an opinion, and that they still stand by that statement. Anecdotal material will not be accepted.


www.skepdic.com...

Then, if you get past that, you have to undergo a "preliminary test".

Then, if all these things fall into place and you are famous ( yep that's the first requirement, you must have media attention).

THEN... if you can still pass ANOTHER round of scutiny,... he MAY let you take the challenge.


No one will ever pass Randi's BS challenge.. it is set up for failure.

I sure hope ATSers have enogh information to dismiss Randi along with other manipulators who can't fathom anything other than their views, and will fix the game to ensure they are right.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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For our current well, my wife's Uncle was here visiting, and I mentioned that we were getting our well dug the next day.

He reached over, grabbed a couple of branches off of an apple tree, quickly twisted them, walked around the yard with them out in front of him.

Suddenly, both branches literally bent straight down.

He said "you folks are lucky, there's an artesian well around 150' down right here."

We stuck a rock over that spot.
Guys came the next day and I told them where to dig.

At 160', suddenly the well FLOODS water out (it sounded strangle flowing UP the well!) and stays that way for hours. It finally leveled off, and they determined that the well produces 15 gallons a minute, at minimum.

In over 20 years we have NEVER had any issues with water, it's fabulous tasting, and in plently of quantity, so this WORKS..



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by BadNinja68
 


What you mean is, when these people cant cheat or manipulate the test they cant pass it.

Read down that article...this made me laugh



The offer of cash prizes as an incentive to so-called psychics to prove their claims is not new. In 1922, Scientific American offered two $2,500 awards, one for the first person who could produce an authentic spirit photograph under test conditions and the other for the first medium to produce an authentic "visible psychic manifestation" (Christopher 1975: 180). Houdini, the foremost magician of the period, was a member of the investigating committee. Nobody won the prizes. The first to announce she was ready to be tested was Elizabeth Allen Tomson, but after she was caught with twenty yards of gauze taped to her groin, flowers under her breasts, and a snake in her arm pit, she was never formally tested (Christopher 1975: 188). The honor of being the first medium tested by the Scientific American team went to George Valiantine. He didn't know that the chair he sat in during his séance in a completely darkened room had been wired to light up a signal in an adjoining room every time he left his seat. Oddly, phenomena such as a voice speaking from a trumpet that floated about the room happened only at the exact moments the signal lit up.


And this


One would think that after more than 150 years of scientific testing of psychics, there would be at least one who could demonstrate a single psychic ability under test conditions.



People cannot do these things under test conditions...because they cant really do them. Its an illusion...like magic.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by loves a conspiricy
reply to post by BadNinja68
 


What you mean is, when these people cant cheat or manipulate the test they cant pass it.

Read down that article...this made me laugh



The offer of cash prizes as an incentive to so-called psychics to prove their claims is not new. In 1922, Scientific American offered two $2,500 awards, one for the first person who could produce an authentic spirit photograph under test conditions and the other for the first medium to produce an authentic "visible psychic manifestation" (Christopher 1975: 180). Houdini, the foremost magician of the period, was a member of the investigating committee. Nobody won the prizes. The first to announce she was ready to be tested was Elizabeth Allen Tomson, but after she was caught with twenty yards of gauze taped to her groin, flowers under her breasts, and a snake in her arm pit, she was never formally tested (Christopher 1975: 188). The honor of being the first medium tested by the Scientific American team went to George Valiantine. He didn't know that the chair he sat in during his séance in a completely darkened room had been wired to light up a signal in an adjoining room every time he left his seat. Oddly, phenomena such as a voice speaking from a trumpet that floated about the room happened only at the exact moments the signal lit up.


And this


One would think that after more than 150 years of scientific testing of psychics, there would be at least one who could demonstrate a single psychic ability under test conditions.



People cannot do these things under test conditions...because they cant really do them. Its an illusion...like magic.




Did you read what I posted?
See the link?
It's from a website that agrees with Randi's methods.

I don't know if people can do some of these things.. but I do KNOW that even if they could they could not pass Randi's tests.
LMAO....
They need " Academic Valitadtion" before he will even test them.
That means they need to find a scientist or member of accepted academia to put heir professional reputation on the line for them to even begin testing.
Then Randi tailor makes a test you cannot pass based on the infromation given by the academic..

It's a catch 22.
No one can pass it no matter what. It's a fake.


How come no one supporting Randi ever acknowledges the fallacy of his testingf methods?

How many tenured professors or gant holding scientists would dare touch this with a ten foot pole?
None.. Randi win's by default, never having to put up a single cent.


Sorry, Randi exposed himself as a fraud.


In the ganzfeld telepathy test the meta-analytic hit rate with unselected subjects is 32% where chance expectation is 25%. If that 32% hit rate is the "real" telepathy effect, then for us to have a 99% chance of getting a significant effect at p < 0.005, we would need to run 989 trials. One ganzfeld session lasts about 1.5 hours, or about 1,483 total hours. Previous experiments show that it is not advisable to run more than one session per day. So we have to potentially recruit 989 x 2 people to participate, an experimenter who will spend 4+ years running these people day in and day out, and at the end we'll end up with p < 0.005. Randi will say those results aren't good enough, because you could get such a result by chance 5 in 1,000 times. Thus, he will require odds against chance of at least a million to 1 to pay out $1 million, and then the amount of time and money it would take to get a significant result would be far in excess of $1 million.


You will never appease Randi's standards.


Furthermore, applicants must first pass a 'preliminary test', before they are allowed to progress to the actual 'formal' test which pays the million dollars. So an applicant must first show positive results in a preliminary test (yielding results against chance of at least 1000 to 1, apparently), then once through to the next stage they would then have to show positive results against much higher odds to claim the prize (by all reports, at odds of around 1 million to 1). Failure in either test means no cash prize, and a fail beside their name. It many respects it would be like telling a professional golfer to shoot 63 around Augusta National, then come back and shoot 59, to prove that he can play golf. In the words of Chris Carter, author of Parapsychology and the Skeptics:

If Randi were genuinely interested in testing unusual claims, then he would also not insist upon odds of at least one million to one against chance for the results. Anyone familiar with scientific studies will be aware that experimental results against chance of say, 800,000 to one would be considered extraordinary; but results this high would be, according to Randi, a “failure.”

www.dailygrail.com...




edit on 9/29/1111 by BadNinja68 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


Actually if your lucky pants generate more static electricity, that excuse may be valid! Did you just read my post, and the ones before it? It's not BS, there's science behind it.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by Thestargateisreal
 



Can you link me to the scientific papers that prove its real then please


I havent found anything....nothing remotely backed by science.



posted on Sep, 29 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


First of all, get out from in front of the computer. Secondly, take an old clothes hanger (the kind you get from the dry cleaners), bend it in half. Straighten your halves out. Now make them into L shapes. Take one bottle of water, sit it in an area of your house that does not have any pipes or active electricity. Rub socked feet on carpet. Hold rods over water. Observe as rods cross each other slowly. Now go to another part of your house, turn on a faucet, and follow the pipe. It's very simple. When you follow a link, you're taking the author at their word (internet info sucks, because anyone can publish it!). When you do it yourself, you're making your own observation and conclusions. If you can test it yourself, and you want the best info you can get, then you test it yourself.



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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Hmmm....don't need a study or any proof. As soon as I read this I snipped a wire hanger and went to work. The first place it led me was directly over the the water pipes in the house......and second I simply tested it outside over my ordinary hose. I filled the hose with water (watched to make sure no one was looking) and tried the rods. There was an unmistakeable pull and the rods crossed right over the hose. As soon as I stepped over the hose they moved apart - it actually felt like two magnets repelling each other. You can honestly feel it if you pay attention...... Why does anyone think this is silly? Older people (in some areas) don't think anything of it. I mentioned it to my mom and right away she remembered my grandfather had some "stick or device" that he said would detect water. I don't know why this is even an argument as anyone can test it out.

Edit: Just actually read your post Stargateisreal
Agreed! Star for you.
edit on 10/11/2011 by glad_to_be_His because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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Dowsing is real,it works.
Maybe not for everyone,but many have the potential.
I know it works,but try telling that to someone who it does not work for-They will say its bullcrap.

And yes,you can test it over a stream or even near a radiator in your house.

We become the conductor for the field I think.
By using the rods,we can perceive minute changes in the EM field.
Which can lead us to water,or oil,or any other minerals.
Its an ancient gift which we still can use.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 02:50 PM
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Originally posted by loves a conspiricy
Dowsing does NOT work.....you may come across water by pure chance but there is no science behind it.

Water is everywhere below our feet, so these people often find it by chance rather than skill.


If scientifically the odds are for finding water very good by chance because there is so much water under us, and if dowsing is a hoax, then the companies who charge 10,000 dollars to come and find water for a well is also taking advantage of people and are frauds. Digging a hole cost little to nothing. Paying 10,000 for a guy to tell you where to dig is stupid. If the dowser and these companies have about the same odds but for way cheaper, doesn't it make sense to go with the dowser? ( even if you have to dig a few holes)

Perhaps some parts of the scientific community itself is in on this money making scam - wouldn't be the first time.

In this experiment from a scientist who has researched this for over 10 years it was found that dowsers do hit their mark more consistently than chance alone would allow.


Now comes a massive set of data that suggests there may be some validity to dowsers' claims. The encouraging words are contained in a study financed by the German government and published in the Journal Of Scientific Exploration, www.jse.com... which is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published at Stanford University.

The project was conducted by the Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammenarbeit in the hope of finding cheaper and more reliable ways of locating drinking water supplies in Third World countries.

Researchers analyzed the successes and failures of dowsers in attempting to locate water at more than 2000 sites in arid regions of Sri Lanka, Zaire, Kenya, Namibia and Yemen over a 10-year period. To do this, researchers teamed geological experts with experienced dowsers and then set up a scientific study group to evaluate the results. Drill crews guided by dowsers didn't hit water every time, but their success rate was impressive. In Sri Lanka, for example, they drilled 691 holes and had an overall success rate of 96 percent.

"In hundreds of cases the dowsers were able to predict the depth of the water source and the yield of the well to within 10 percent or 20 percent," says Hans-Dieter Betz, a physicist at the University of Munich, who headed the research group.

"We carefully considered the statistics of these correlations, and they far exceeded lucky guesses," he says. What's more, virtually all of the sites in Sri Lanka were in regions where the odds of finding water by random drilling were extremely low. As for a USGS notion that dowsers get subtle clues from the landscape and geology, Betz points out that the underground sources were often more than 100 ft. deep and so narrow that misplacing the drill only a few feet would mean digging a dry hole.

As impressive as this success rate may seem, it doesn't do much to change the minds of skeptics. Their preference is to test dowsing under more controlled conditions. Back To The Lab

Anticipating this criticism, the German researchers matched their field work with laboratory experiments in which they had dowsers attempt to locate water-filled pipes inside a building. The tests were similar to those conducted by CSICOP and JREF, and similarly discouraging. Skeptics see the poor showing as evidence of failure. Betz sees the discrepancy as an important clue. He says that subtle electromagnetic gradients may result when natural fissures and water flows create changes in the electrical properties of rock and soil. Dowsers, he theorizes, somehow sense these gradients and unconsciously respond by wagging their forked sticks, pendulums or bent wires.

Low-Energy Sensor

There is ample evidence that humans can detect small amounts of energy. All creatures with eyes can detect extremely small amounts of electromagnetic energy at visible light wavelengths. Some researchers believe the dark-adapted human eye can detect a single photon, the smallest measurable quantity of energy. Biologists also have found nonvisual electric and magnetic sensing organs in creatures from bacteria to sharks, fish and birds. Physiologists, however, have yet to find comparable structures in humans.

Betz offers no theories of how dowsers come by their skill and prefers to confine his speculation to his data. "There are two things that I am certain of after 10 years of field research," he says. "A combination of dowsing and modern techniques can be both more successful, and far less expensive, than we had thought."
www.popularmechanics.com...

There is no reason to state that dowsing therefore does not work simply because science cannot explain it. This is unscientific and against the very core of science. All who make such claims without proof to the contrary are pseudo scientists. This is proof science doesn't have.
edit on 15-10-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp





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