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'Silent Majority' Agrees With Me, Voters Believe

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posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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Interesting article from Science Digest.

For example, I've seen many people post opinions here that this or that political ideology constitutes a majority, when polls show the facts to be quite different.

This article explains how people come to believe something other than reality.

Science Digest source


We like to think that others agree with us. It's called "social projection," and it helps us validate our beliefs and ourselves. Psychologists have found that we tend to think people who are similar to us in one explicit way -- say, religion or lifestyle -- will act and believe as we do, and vote as we do. Meanwhile, we exaggerate differences between ourselves and those who are explicitly unlike us.


How true! Just look at what goes on around here ...
edit on 9/21/2011 by centurion1211 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 12:38 PM
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I have a friend who is into conspiracy theories hardcore and he is very intelligent. Even gets into religious debates, you would think he's atheist. Nope, this dude is a hardcore christian. This dude used to pray every time we would get high or eat food. I mean, that's how much he loves God. Or Jesus, whatever Christianity is...

I used to not get how someone like that, super smart, was still blinded by faith but it points back to your post. People will always have different views. I love the guy to death but when he gets all Jesus on me, I become super confused and my logic starts to deter from what we're talking about.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by centurion1211
 

I'm glad you agree with me, centurion.



I just wish ATS would have an "opposite day". I know I'd be one baaaaad socialist!



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 12:58 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer
reply to post by centurion1211
 

I'm glad you agree with me, centurion.



I just wish ATS would have an "opposite day". I know I'd be one baaaaad socialist!


According to the OP, "lots" of people do - and agree with me as well.

From the Sci-fi movie 2010, "It's all very clear to me now."




posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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I know that I'm a political minority and most people on this site are.


Most people could care less about current events, world issues, politics anyway



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by centurion1211
 


My irony sense is going haywire, Centurion.

Ah well. Anyone with a lick of sense already knew this. Things like this remind me of studies to etermine the relative wetness of water



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 01:34 PM
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"People want to validate their opinions, to believe their opinions are right," says Koudenburg. "They are also motivated to promote their party's success," which entails convincing others that it represents the majority's beliefs. The researchers aren't certain whether these exaggerations are conscious strategies or unconscious wishes, she avers. Further research might help sort that out.
reply to post by centurion1211
 
Form link posted by op

The study is showing most people overestimate support for there cause. Like you said, just look around here.

edit on 21-9-2011 by LDragonFire because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-9-2011 by LDragonFire because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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Originally posted by mnmcandiez
I know that I'm a political minority and most people on this site are.


Most people could care less about current events, world issues, politics anyway


Indeed , these days any interest in politics, economics, world affairs makes you a minority right away.

Having a particular ideological conviction within any of those topics practically puts you on an extinction watch list :-)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by TheWalkingFox
reply to post by centurion1211
 


Ah well. Anyone with a lick of sense already knew this.


Care to post a poll or psychological study backing up your views?

I think all anyone has to do is read a handful of posts in one of the political forums (fora) for verification of the OP.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer
reply to post by centurion1211
 

I'm glad you agree with me, centurion.



I just wish ATS would have an "opposite day". I know I'd be one baaaaad socialist!


you mean where we could get to go around calling people stupid redkneck racist islamophobe facists nazis for disagreeing?

count me in

edit on 21-9-2011 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 05:26 PM
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I live in Georgia it is full of "stupid redkneck racist islamophobe facists nazis" -- no one agrees with me.
edit on 21-9-2011 by spyder550 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by spyder550
I live in Georgia it is full of "stupid redkneck racist islamophobe facists nazis" -- no one agrees with me.
edit on 21-9-2011 by spyder550 because: (no reason given)


the EXACT same as my town in New Mexico. It's good to know the dumb are spread out that far.
edit on 21-9-2011 by Absco because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by centurion1211
 


love your avatar
second line.......
what is spqr?



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by speaknoevil07
reply to post by centurion1211
 


love your avatar
second line.......
what is spqr?


Senatus PopulusQue Romanum = Senate and people of Rome

Thanks! And thanks to Slayer69 for the avatar ...
edit on 9/21/2011 by centurion1211 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by centurion1211
 



We like to think that others agree with us. It's called "social projection," and it helps us validate our beliefs and ourselves. Psychologists have found that we tend to think people who are similar to us in one explicit way -- say, religion or lifestyle -- will act and believe as we do, and vote as we do. Meanwhile, we exaggerate differences between ourselves and those who are explicitly unlike us.


Well it certainly explains why we don't see people changing their minds around here. It seems our notions are cast in stone....



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 07:05 AM
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I have the opposite attitude on this site. It seems that the majority are opposed to whatever it is that I think or believe. Maybe it's the star system - when barely-literate posts get a dozen stars because they repeat some mangled party line, it makes me think that there are a dozen people who strongly agree with that contentless post. Maybe it's all a 'Megaphone' kind of thing, though, with members signing up just to give stars and inflate the sense of their side's strength. Who can say?



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 07:15 AM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


But.. you do know socialism isn't really a threat. Fox news and other conservatives
just threw that out there.. They've got you guys in some kind of deluded red scare.

Healthcare doesn't mean socialism.. just means healthcare.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 07:18 AM
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I'm good friends with several people whom are the polar opposite in political opinions as I am and we both have found we are not that much different. It hasn't changed my political beliefs but it has changed my beliefs in others.



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by centurion1211

This article explains how people come to believe something other than reality.



I found this batch of information, which shows that Republicans believe something other than reality.



A June 9 Washington Post/ABC News poll found that 61 percent of people believe higher taxes will be necessary to reduce the deficit.

A June 7 Pew poll found strong support for tax increases to reduce the deficit; 67 percent of people favor raising the wage cap for Social Security taxes, 66 percent raising income tax rates on those making more than $250,000, and 62 percent favor limiting tax deductions for large corporations. A plurality of people would also limit the mortgage interest deduction.

A May 26 Lake Research poll of Colorado voters found that they support higher taxes on the rich to shore-up Social Security’s finances by a 44 percent to 25 percent margin.

A May 13 Bloomberg poll found that only one third of people believe it is possible to substantially reduce the budget deficit without higher taxes; two thirds do not.

A May 12 Ipsos/Reuters poll found that three-fifths of people would support higher taxes to reduce the deficit.

A May 4 Quinnipiac poll found that people favor raising taxes on those making more than $250,000 to reduce the deficit by a 69 percent to 28 percent margin.

An April 29 Gallup poll found that only 20 percent of people believe the budget deficit should be reduced only by cutting spending; 76 percent say that higher taxes must play a role.

An April 25 USC/Los Angeles Times poll of Californians found that by about a 2-to-1 margin voters favor raising taxes to deal with the state’s budget problems over cutting spending alone.

An April 22 New York Times/CBS News poll found that 72 percent of people favor raising taxes on the rich to reduce the deficit. It also found that 66 percent of people believe tax increases will be necessary to reduce the deficit versus 19 percent who believe spending cuts alone are sufficient.

An April 20 Washington Post/ABC News poll found that by a 2-to-1 margin people favor a combination of higher taxes and spending cuts over spending cuts alone to reduce the deficit. It also found that 72 percent of people favor raising taxes on the rich to reduce the deficit and it is far and away the most popular deficit reduction measure.

An April 20 Public Religion Research Institute poll found that by a 2-to-1 margin, people believe that the wealthy should pay more taxes than the poor or middle class. Also, 62 percent of people believe that growing inequality of wealth is a serious problem.

An April 18 McClatchy-Marist poll found that voters support higher taxes on the rich to reduce the deficit by a 2-to-1 margin, including 45 percent of self-identified Tea Party members.

An April 18 Gallup poll found that 67 percent of people do not believe that corporations pay their fair share of taxes, and 59 percent believe that the rich do not pay their fair share.

On April 1, Tulchin Research released a poll showing that voters in California overwhelmingly support higher taxes on the rich to deal with the state’s budgetary problems.

A March 15 ABC News/Washington Post poll found that only 31 percent of voters support the Republican policy of only cutting spending to reduce the deficit; 64 percent believe higher taxes will also be necessary.

A March 2 NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll found that 81 percent of people would support a surtax on millionaires to help reduce the budget deficit, and 68 percent would support eliminating the Bush tax cuts for those earning more than $250,000.

A February 15 CBS News poll found that only 49 percent of people believe that reducing the deficit will require cuts in programs that benefit them; 41 percent do not. Also, only 37 percent of people believe that reducing the deficit will require higher taxes on them; 59 percent do not.

A January 20 CBS News/New York Times poll found that close to two-thirds of people would rather raise taxes than cut benefits for Social Security or Medicare in order to stabilize their finances. The poll also found that if taxes must be raised, 33 percent would favor a national sales tax, 32 percent would support restricting the mortgage interest deduction, 12 percent would raise the gasoline taxes, and 10 percent would tax health care benefits.

On January 3, a 60 Minutes/Vanity Fair poll found that 61 percent of people would rather raise taxes on the rich to balance the budget than cut defense, Social Security or Medicare.



capitalgainsandgames.com...



posted on Sep, 23 2011 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by GogoVicMorrow
reply to post by beezzer
 


But.. you do know socialism isn't really a threat. Fox news and other conservatives
just threw that out there.. They've got you guys in some kind of deluded red scare.

Healthcare doesn't mean socialism.. just means healthcare.


For the life of me, I can't tell... Grow men acting like they are in 1952 all over again,
I'm waiting for J Edgar to to come back ova here. The guys in the bar play this same
thing, either they are some wimpy dudes, mesmerized by the Television set or playing
a role. I think its the last one, just trying to scare people into a fearful voting binge..
edit on 23-9-2011 by mastahunta because: (no reason given)



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