Unbelievable home built out of two shipping containers (38 Photos)

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posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
might want to rethink those comments

metal container+ lightning=crispy critters

great innovative idea but they carry risks
edit on 21-9-2011 by neo96 because: (no reason given)


a moron could channel lightning away from a building....id assume they will account for that...a good test of their creativity would be to see if they could absorb a lightning strike and use it for power
edit on 22-9-2011 by Silicis n Volvo because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 01:38 PM
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A metal box is like your car, it creates a "valence shell" (especially if properly grounded) so no harm to the occupant.

Your home already has a ground rod, look at your electrical panel and your water lines, you'll see a thick copper wire that leads outside and is buried several feet into the earth.
 

I love some of the designs linked to in this thread, although I still caution that to achieve the more elaborate you'll spend a lot more than you would using conventional construction. The other big hang-up is urban building codes. Obviously if you live in a remote area and have minimal codes (or none, like in parts of Montana) this could be a great way to build a home/shelter for little cost, but in most parts you have to comply with building codes and this is where things get expensive. I worked with a builder putting in a container home and we had to not only put it on a full slab but build into the slab a cellar with outside access to contain the utilities. Having to do all that eradicated the cost savings of going with a container. Most cities will also not permit a container home in the same fashion they'll block a trailer home or mobile home, i.e., they're restricted by zoning laws. Even going with a much more conventional pre-fab style home has some zoning issues that can add to costs.

I think most people will find out that to turn a container into a nice livable home isn't any more cost-effective than utilizing any of the vast number of pre-fab architecture out there. Containers have their pros, but they also have a number of cons.
 


On a similar note, anyone remember the old boxcar homes that were the rage from the 40's and 50's? I still see some of these when traveling through northern Minnesota. An old railroad boxcar with it's wheels removed and a porch slapped on over the door and instant home.
edit on 22-9-2011 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 01:52 PM
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It seems that used shipping containers cost around $1500 to $2000 (USD). So...it's not bad, but all the other materials he used look more expensive. I wonder how much he saved by using the containers as opposed to stick built with foundation?

Surely he had to create a foundation so they don't settle weird?
edit on 9/22/2011 by Cryptonomicon because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 02:08 PM
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Originally posted by neo96
might want to rethink those comments

metal container+ lightning=crispy critters

great innovative idea but they carry risks
edit on 21-9-2011 by neo96 because: (no reason given)


Thats not true, the best place to be is in a metal box. The lightning woud travel down the skin of the building.



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 01:54 AM
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reply to post by benrl
 


Make sure you get brand new containers and coat them with good paint. We have two at work that have rust holes in them after 5 years. You may want to consider a real roof. Also, before you make the final choice, go into one of them in the summer time. They get hot inside (90 degrees outside = 120 inside), to say the least.

I'm also only seeing two containers. Where do you see four DB? They are roughly the size of a small double wide if you put two together. About 20 paces from back to front.
edit on 27-9-2011 by Thestargateisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 10:54 AM
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reply to post by Thestargateisreal
 


Sno-seal or any of those rubberized roof/waterproof coatings would work...
if it were me I'd put down like a 2 inch blue-board and cover with a EPDM rubber roofing sheet...
not only would help insulate but cut down on the noise from rain and hail...



posted on Sep, 27 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Oooh yea. Forgot about the noise rain makes on the metal containers. I rarely go out there (to the trailers), especially in the rain so I forgot about that.



posted on Feb, 14 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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I just found this thread and wanted to say that it has inspired me immensely.

Reading about these innovative solutions to building new homes makes me smile.







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