The Origin Of Dogs – Biogenetic engineering

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posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by LiveForever8
 


I guess the same reasoning can be applied to domestic cats. Interesting how they are the only feline species domesticable and with portable size, as if they had been genetically miniaturized.



In many Sumerian steles we can see the ANUNNAKI taming lions, the princess INANNA most of times. Notice the dimensions of the Sumerian alien-gods compared with an adult lion. Perhaps domestic cats are engineered species, created for amuse humans. They were largely worshiped in the ancient Egypt. Also is very curious how cats and dogs are animal species capable of exert total influence in human psyche. In many cases even healing influence.

edit on 9/21/2011 by 1AnunnakiBastard because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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Double post.
edit on 9/21/2011 by 1AnunnakiBastard because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by WHOS READY
I have often thought about this.

it just seems too convenient that we have these lovely pets,, this great food- pigs, cows, sheep etc... it's all too convenient!

until you bring in to the equation genesis 1:26- Then [the council of] god[s] said, “Let Us make mankind in Our image, in Our likeness, so that they may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.”

could these same 'gods' have engineered the convenient animals for the people??.. truth is stranger than fiction...


As I am of the considered opinion that Humans were genetically engineered by ET's, I would not be surprised to discover that Our food animals were tinkered with as well.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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Well I'm glad our ancestors domesticated wolves.


Dogs are amazing



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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There is a family In North Idaho whose house is directly on the side of the freeway that have raised/bred/tamed wild Timberwolves. You can stop, pet em, take pictures with them and buy souvenirs in the gift shop. Google cocolalla wolf people and you'll see domesticated wolves. I lived about a mile up the road from them on the lake and it is a awesome place to check out. Wolves can be domesticated and there is your proof, it just takes a lot more time and training that most working people don't have. Not to mention being physical enough with the dog for it to know who is Alpha which most people won't do.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 12:18 PM
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Simple man has done this all before, an advance civilization of man 150,000 years ago at most was here and now is not.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by LiveForever8
 


The general wisdom on the topic is that it was a long process of selective breeding that generated dogs. This rellationship was pivotol to humans as it is believed to be the source of our hunting practices. I believe Discovery National Geographic, and PBS have done specials on it since 2005. In one of these a woman experimented with these techniques on foxes to make both dog like qualities and a seperate branch of wolf like qualities. I have personally seen a domesticated grey that has reared kittens but her sister has been known to kill cats. I would provide links but i find it less than easy on my pos droid.

Edit: I now realize on this site I should specify grey wolf not grey alien ;-)

edit on 21-9-2011 by trollslayer because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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You might find this of interest:Dogs Decoded
In this doc, they studied foxes and from each litter they chose one dog that was the least aggressive to humans, then they bred that one with others that were similar and eventually got a litter of foxes that were not afraid of people and were actually tame, in a sense. I'm not sure if wolves could be worked with the same way though.
This Thread was interesting too, and surely provided more questions about nature's use of evolution.
From your link:

Later developments of dogs were much more conscious and deliberate. In some ways the genetically engineered dogs that later appeared often seem to be more like “inventions” rather than domesticated animals. These include dogs genetically modified to hunt, point, retrieve, pull sleds, track, and even provide empathic companionship. However, these newly invented dogs were elaborations that started with the sociable and nonaggressive personality that dogs had developed on their own while pawing through the garbage heaps created by our human ancestors.

Maybe it was nature's symbiosis result, that helped usher in the domestication and more dog like traits.

Peace,
spec
edit on 21-9-2011 by speculativeoptimist because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 01:18 PM
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A lot of people in this thread don't seem to have read up on how dogs evolved


Which makes it even weirder that they come up with demonstrably wrong claims to make up for that lack in knowledge.




Carles Vila, who has conducted the most extensive study to date, has shown that DNA evidence has ruled out any ancestor canine species except the wolf.


LINK
edit on 21-9-2011 by MrXYZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 03:25 PM
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I'd like to turn the thought around and ask: How have dogs/wolves domesticated humans? What did our ancient ancestors learn from them about hunting and survival? It is not inconceivable that the people of 50,000 years ago watched the wolves from afar, witnessed their hunts, and feasted on the remains of their kills. Maybe they imitated the pack, tried to incorporate some of the wolf in themselves before ever trying to physically engage with it. There are many native American cultures that worship and revere the wolf as a model of right being in the world. Wolves kill only out of necessity, they defend their own and their territory, they go the extra mile, they stick together, they endure. Perhaps dogs began as a more perfect aspect of ourselves, and became the debauched "man's best friend" only as we lost sense of what being a genuine hu-man was all about.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 03:57 PM
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Dogs are lame, they're just pussified wolves. Instead of breeding that crap they rather should've tried to make wolves more civil and useful but not losing all his power and strength and just the sheer awesomness wolves have



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by 1AnunnakiBastard
 


Well the cats brain is very similar to ours, more so than dogs. [url=http://www.helium.com...]
edit on 21-9-2011 by Silverado292 because: Grammer



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by Ariess
 


I read about this in National Geographic.

Here is the article: ngm.nationalgeographic.com...

A very interesting study.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 10:09 PM
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I know someone will bash me for saying this but... Meh. Who can absolutely say it was genetic intervention? Our ancient ancestors could do AMAZING things. Who says that it was limited to buildings? Also I just have a feeling that civilizations go in cycles, that we are not the first advanced civilization on the Earth. Aliens? Maybe. Humans? Possibly.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 10:40 PM
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Originally posted by Ariess
Humans and wolves occupied the same environments since their beginnings. Naturally they interacted frequently. Both being social meat eaters, the humans realized that wolves were useful creatures, and the wolves began to know humans as sources of food rather then prey. Humans then found that there were wolves that were naturally more comfortable around humans and less aggressive. These semi-tame wolves were welcomed by humans. The more aggressive, nervous, and nasty wolves were most likely killed or run off. Over time through countless generations domesticated dogs arouse. Tameness is not only taught by nurturing animals from birth. It is actually naturally engrained in the animals' genetics.

The whole process has actually been proven. In Siberia foxes were bred according to their natural tameness, whereas only the most tame individuals were allowed to reproduce. This experiment/program was started in 1959 and is still on going. Now they are fully domesticated. They are not only comfortable around humans and tolerate being handled, but they actually desire human attention and affection and give it back. They are known to wag their tails, and great people with excitement. Interestingly through the selection of foxes solely on their tame characteristics, certain physical traits have evolved. Their fur has changed colors, their ears have become more floppy, their limbs have become shorter, and their tails have become curlier. This, I think, can explain why dogs have become so different from wolves.
www.sibfox.com...


I understant your theory and it does seem possible, but I know it's NOT possible to domesticate a wolf, not even one that's half wolf, because I've tried. I came to realize that a wolf can never be fully domesticated and I know dogs! My wolf would have protected me with his life and that was the problem. Even after getting him neutered he got away from me and ran with a pack of dogs twice. He was the leader! Even though the bond between wolf and human can be very strong, they are a one owner dog that you can never turn your back on or trust to be around any other stranger. I could take a T-bone steak out of his mouth, but noone else could be around him. I trusted him with my life, but he was a liability, because I couldn't have anyone near him and I raised him from a pup. If I couldn't completely tame him, I'm sure noone else could either.

That wild instinct and fear within the wolf makes it impossible to completely domesticate. So, I have wondered about the same thing. How could every kind of breed come from the wolf?



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:07 PM
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www.pbs.org...

I didn't know this, but the wolf has a scent organ in the tail area that the dog doesn't have. Maybe that's the difference that determines the behavior.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:21 PM
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Originally posted by MrXYZ
reply to post by LiveForever8
 


What a bunch of pseudo-science on that website. I strongly suggest you find some proper, scientific, peer-reviewed sources.



O you mean the clone science where everybody just agrees with everybody else and if you question " the truth " you are ridiculed for life ...

Yea that sounds smart and logical.

Modern science is for people who love to think they are right about everything so they use our misguided judgements as " proof" ..


I guess you can believe stuff.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by ShadowAngel85
Dogs are lame, they're just pussified wolves. Instead of breeding that crap they rather should've tried to make wolves more civil and useful but not losing all his power and strength and just the sheer awesomness wolves have


Well, once you ave perfected your time machine, you can go and put this right.

Just remember to take your handy, pocket caveman translator.

Dogs are lame?

That's the craziest thing that's ever been written on this site!

Dog's are boss. Brilliant creatures.

Funny, kind and brave. I love em.

Thanks mr pussy wolf for being the progenitor of the greatest animal on the planet.



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 12:23 AM
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Originally posted by MrXYZ
A lot of people in this thread don't seem to have read up on how dogs evolved


Which makes it even weirder that they come up with demonstrably wrong claims to make up for that lack in knowledge.




Carles Vila, who has conducted the most extensive study to date, has shown that DNA evidence has ruled out any ancestor canine species except the wolf.


LINK
edit on 21-9-2011 by MrXYZ because: (no reason given)





Archaeology has placed the earliest known domestication at potentially 30,000 BC,[1][2] and with certainty at 7,000 BC.[3] Other evidence suggests that dogs were first domesticated in East Asia.[14]


I find this hypothesis quite surprising. In this short amount of time we have numerous mutations and every kind of breed came out of these mutations in such a short amount of time. Why can't man domesticate the gorilla or ape? Where are the mutations among these species? Oh, it's me!

It took thousands of years for man to have evolved from an ape, but a short amount of time for the wolf to mutate into several breed of the canine species. That's quite a few mutations in such a short amount of time and I'm not surprised at the perplexity. (Just thinking here)



posted on Sep, 22 2011 @ 03:29 AM
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Originally posted by Onboard2

Originally posted by Ariess
Humans and wolves occupied the same environments since their beginnings. Naturally they interacted frequently. Both being social meat eaters, the humans realized that wolves were useful creatures, and the wolves began to know humans as sources of food rather then prey. Humans then found that there were wolves that were naturally more comfortable around humans and less aggressive. These semi-tame wolves were welcomed by humans. The more aggressive, nervous, and nasty wolves were most likely killed or run off. Over time through countless generations domesticated dogs arouse. Tameness is not only taught by nurturing animals from birth. It is actually naturally engrained in the animals' genetics.

The whole process has actually been proven. In Siberia foxes were bred according to their natural tameness, whereas only the most tame individuals were allowed to reproduce. This experiment/program was started in 1959 and is still on going. Now they are fully domesticated. They are not only comfortable around humans and tolerate being handled, but they actually desire human attention and affection and give it back. They are known to wag their tails, and great people with excitement. Interestingly through the selection of foxes solely on their tame characteristics, certain physical traits have evolved. Their fur has changed colors, their ears have become more floppy, their limbs have become shorter, and their tails have become curlier. This, I think, can explain why dogs have become so different from wolves.
www.sibfox.com...


I understant your theory and it does seem possible, but I know it's NOT possible to domesticate a wolf, not even one that's half wolf, because I've tried. I came to realize that a wolf can never be fully domesticated and I know dogs! My wolf would have protected me with his life and that was the problem. Even after getting him neutered he got away from me and ran with a pack of dogs twice. He was the leader! Even though the bond between wolf and human can be very strong, they are a one owner dog that you can never turn your back on or trust to be around any other stranger. I could take a T-bone steak out of his mouth, but noone else could be around him. I trusted him with my life, but he was a liability, because I couldn't have anyone near him and I raised him from a pup. If I couldn't completely tame him, I'm sure noone else could either.

That wild instinct and fear within the wolf makes it impossible to completely domesticate. So, I have wondered about the same thing. How could every kind of breed come from the wolf?



You've confused domestication with tame. A wolf pup brought up in a house of people will be/ might be tame but not domesticated. Domestication is not just an animal that is friendly to people. There's actually biological changes that take place and it doesn't happen within just one or two generations. Lions and tigers can be tamed but not domesticated, A bear can be tamed but not domesticated. Not all animals can be domesticated and the breeds that can be are truly a very small % of the animal kingdom

Wolves can be domesticated because they have and they evolved into the dog as a result but it didn't happen over night. When the Russians did it with the grey fox it took about 20 generations I think.


circuswatchwa.org...
edit on 22-9-2011 by steveknows because: (no reason given)
edit on 22-9-2011 by steveknows because: (no reason given)





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