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The vedic civilization and evolution of society in India

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posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 08:10 AM
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Ashwamedh Yagna

Wikipedia articles on Veda are all incorrect, lies, and designed to mislead people. The sources quoted in these articles are people who do not have even an iota of Vedic knowledge.

The problem is that the British approached Veda only from the angle of defaming the culture of India. British feared the original Vedic culture the most, and considered it as an impediment to their objective of subjugating Indian people. I am surprised at the level of lies being thrown about, and relying on sources who could not have understood more than a word or two of Sanskrit.

The corruption of Indian society helped the British. The establishment of a feudal society in post-Vedic period gave rise to a host of anti-vedic practices, including the loss of Brahiminical traditions that sustained Vedic knowledge.

Vedic Sanskrit is very hard to understand for two reasons - a. The language is very old and completely different from vernacular Sanskrit. b. The mantra convey a deep spiritual meaning which is mostly disconnected to anything seen on Earth in the physical plane. Veda is not about rituals. Rituals are designed by man in which Veda mantra are used. Veda is just knowledge which can only be understood either by a Yogi, or from Upnishad where such mantra are explained. No ordinary human is capable of understanding Veda mantra - indian or otherwise.


edit on 28-10-2011 by vedatruth because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-10-2011 by vedatruth because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 08:27 AM
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en.wikipedia.org...

"The mock bestiality and necrophilia involved in the ritual caused considerable consternation among the scholars first editing the Yajurveda. Griffith (1899) omits verses VSM 23.20–31 (the ritual obscenities), protesting that they are "not reproducible even in the semi-obscurity of a learned European language" (alluding to other instances where he renders explicit scenes in Latin rather than English). A. B. Keith's 1914 translation also omits verses"

I cannot find a bigger example of intellectual dishonesty.

These verses are NOT about a horse being slaughtered or any other animal being slaughtered at all.

These verses have nothing to do with animals.

These verses are about responsibilities of a king, and the punishment that king receives if he does not perform his duty. So there is very good reason why Griffith et. al. would omit these verses.



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 08:57 AM
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The target practice using animals

Valmiki Ramayan mentions at two places live animals being used for target practice - once in the context of Dashrath firing a sound seeking arrow, and another one where Laxman goes with Rama to forests where Rama uses deer for target practice.

Nowhere does the book mention the meat being used.

The book uses adjectives like 'PurushVyagr' (man tiger) for Rama for his speed in battle.

We do have a problem where books like Ramayan, Mahabharat, and Manusmriti have been modified by vested interests, as these books were in vernacular Sanskrit intelligible to people, and their teachings went against corrupt kings. But Veda has not been touched. The people who modified these books simply did not have intellectual calibre to touch Veda without getting detected. The Veda are guarded by Rishis. No man can change the word of God.



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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The Vedic calendar

I have covered measurement of weight and distance. I need to cover time as well.

As is the case with weight etc., time is measured using principle of easily observed natural phenomenon. This makes the calendar quite complex actually, due to complex movement of sun. moon, and constellations with respect to the movement of the earth.

The absolute time carries little significance due to very long period of life of the planet. So the calculation of time is always taken from a marker. This marker would change at different times, normally reset by a dynasty of kings. The most common calendar in use today for calculating time is the 'Vikram Samvat' calendar started by King Vikramaditya.

The calendar is lunisolar - it tracks motion of moon and sun to define months and year. Adjustments are made to months and years periodically to correct the calendar for drift, according to a set of mathematical rules.

The year normally has 12 lunar months, except periodically an extra month is added to a year for adjustment. So each year out of three has 13 months.

The 24 hour day is taken from sunrise to sunrise. Since time of sunrise changes during the year, each day starts at slightly different time. The day is divided into eight parts (prahar). The day is also divided into 30 muhurt. Each muhurt is divided into 2 ghari. (each 'ghari' is 24 minutes).

The 'prahar' are counted from noon (when sun is at highest point), so prahar are accurate and used for waking up time, working time etc.

The time to start something is defined by date (called 'tithi') and 'muhurt'. Muhurt is 48 minutes. The event (like a 'sanskar') is started when the chosen 'muhurt' starts.

The description of events in Ramayan is very clear about keeping to the appointed time. So the tradition of 'lateness' of Indians is not related to Vedic culture.



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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Mechanical clock could be in use in Ramayan time, as the punctuality seems to be a guiding principle. Ayodhya had markets, factories etc. and would have required synchronization of start of work etc. Efficiency was high, as people worked very fast and in very organized way.



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 10:36 AM
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Originally posted by vedatruth
reply to post by ipsedixit
 

So likely Buddha and his fellow students did not get it. This is due to lack of guidance. Only an able master Yogi can guide students.


You are correct as far as the austerities go. Buddha eventually got it and changed his practice accordingly. As I said in my earlier post, he and his companions were not satisfied with the extent of the guidance they had received up to that point. You are underestimating him and his companions considerably.

There are a lot of people in this world, apparently you are one of them, who need authority figures and who need to be told how to live each and every part of their lives, but their number is dwindling as more people are educated and learn to think for themselves.

I certainly wouldn't criticize a person who needs to live their life in accordance with Vedic practices. I don't disparage that way of life.

Probably the closest thing to a comprehensively spiritually mandated lifestyle in our modern world is the sort of Islam practiced in Saudi Arabia. God is the authority figure in that society also.

God has also "chosen" the Jews and it is said by some that nobody can be saved except through Jesus. You say the Vedic religion is the only true religion.

Some people are happy to accept God as an authority and to do what their religious leaders say that God says they should do. I have no problem with that. But personally, I prefer to think for myself.



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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Weapons of Ramayan

Weapons of Rakshas army:

Primary weapon - bow and arrows

Secondary weapons:
a. 'Shatagni' - hundred barrelled gun.
b. 'Nalik' - gun (used from viman, to launch rocket)
c. 'Ishupal' - cannon
d. 'Parigh' - Thick iron chain
e. 'Gada' - mace
f. 'Khadg' - sword
g. 'Pras' -
h. 'Shool' or 'trishool' - spear
i. 'Pattish' - belt with built in spikes
j. 'Mudgar' - club
k. 'Moosal' - hammer
l. 'Nara' - ?
m. 'pash' - net to catch somebody
n. 'parsha' - Axe

Weapons of Vanar army:
a. Tree trunks
b. Stones
c. Mace ('gada')
d. Weapons like 'parigh' and 'khadg' seized from enemy

Weapons of Rama and Laxman:

bow and arrows



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 09:00 PM
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Yoga and austerity

As I have already written before, there are eight parts of yoga. These parts are like a step-ladder. The 'siddhi' or perfection of one step leads to another higher step. The journey starts from 'yama'. People fail in 'yoga' because they fail in 'yama' and 'niyam'. The failure of first two steps makes 'asan' and 'pranayam' worthless. Thus the student sees no material progress and gets frustrated.

A yogic student must realize that previous sins are an impediment to progress. One cannot shake off sins by Yoga. The sins are burned off by five part 'niyam' and may take considerable time depending upon the person.

Yoga requires considerable physical and mental strength. Everyone is not suitable for taking up 'yoga'.

The spiritual progress is attained by most people by 'yama', and 'niyam', the foundation of Vedic religion and the way to make body and mind pure and strong, and suitable for further progress.

Yoga is a way of 'dhir' or patient people. If you want quick results, yoga is not for you. God cannot be dictated or bullied. God gives results when God sees that a soul has become pure enough.

People do all kinds of things in the name of 'yoga'. People get misled either due to their own misconceptions, or get frustrated by lack of progress. These are people who have left family life forever, and it becomes very hard for them. The 'sadhus' are people who have been misled by a 'mahant' or chief of a sect into living a life equal to slavery.

A person should stay in family life until he understands 'Yoga' properly, and has followed 'yama' and 'niyam' for considerable time. There is no advantage of just jumping into austerity without understanding the consequences.



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 09:19 PM
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Ways to realizing God in Veda

God has advised a lifestyle in Veda, which builds up pious qualities in man, and eventually takes a man to moksha - or liberation of soul from cycles of life and death.

There are three ways a man can get moksha:

1. by yagna
2. by yoga
3. by selfless service to Rishis

All the above three require a follower of 'yama' and 'niyam'.

Steadfast duty in the protection of dharm (as a soldier) is the highest form of good karma one can get. A
Kshatriya who is pious and dies fighting for dharm will either get 'moksha' or another life in which he has the capability to get 'moksha'.



posted on Oct, 28 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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reply to post by ipsedixit
 


I am not claiming to be a know-all. But the Yogis who have seen the past by their power have discarded preach of Gautam Buddha.

You are not getting me. Veda is as hard for me as it is for you. But it is what it is.

Islam is an anti-Vedic religion. I consider Buddhism as a social engineering experiment rather than a religion.

As I have told time and again - 'yama' and 'niyam' are the basis of Vedic religion. You cannot call a society Vedic until these rules are upheld by political and legal system.

I stick to my view that Buddha did not attain liberation of soul. I prefer to speak truth rather than lie to appease you or others.



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 12:14 AM
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reply to post by vedatruth
 


How is what visions the Yogis have any different from the experiences that occultists have? What about people who claim to have channeled spirits or were abducted by ETs? I think all of the above are the same, spiritual deception. There can only be one truth and many opinions.



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by 547000
reply to post by vedatruth
 


How is what visions the Yogis have any different from the experiences that occultists have? What about people who claim to have channeled spirits or were abducted by ETs? I think all of the above are the same, spiritual deception. There can only be one truth and many opinions.


I am not aware of 'visions' or 'dreams' that Yogis have.

'shraddha' is 'shat' + 'dha' = always be truthful, perceiving objects and matter as truly exists.

Yogis have no imagination and see no dreams. Their mind is pure and sees only the truth.

A Yogi (means who has achieved 'samadhi') is extremely rare. Your chances of meeting one in your lifetime is equal to your chances of going into space.

Yogis are rare now, but were not rare in Mahabharat time and earlier. Bharat/Aryavrata had robust tradition of 'tapashcharya' where many ordinary man/woman became Rishis in their lifetime.

A Yogi has tremendous powers. I do not want to describe these powers, but you can do some research and use your imagination. I have given a few hints in this thread.



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 02:57 AM
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reply to post by vedatruth
 


What makes a Yogi's perception any truer than any of the number of claimants who have seen the truth? Sorcerers and those who practice black magic have "powers" too. Yet everyone who claims to know the truth says something different. What makes a Yogi undeceived?



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 03:58 AM
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reply to post by 547000
 


The Yogi has powers to see the past and even predict future events fairly accurately.

A yogi can see my past and tell me events from my past just like you see television.

A yogi develops super-intelligence. He can understand any language and any science with little effort.

A yogi can 'travel' large distances almost instantaneously.

I am just giving you a hint here. Yogis do not demonstrate their powers for 'scientific' research. A yogi has nothing to prove to man. The people who know the Yogi witness the power, and then believe.



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 07:22 AM
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Some more explanations from Ramayan

Indraloka - the planet of Indra or Deva

Indra means a person who has control over Indriya. Control over Indriya comes from strength of body and mind, and knowledge of Veda.

Both Ramayan and Mahabharat talk about Indraloka or Devaloka. Although 'dev' is also a race on Earth, I have good reasons to believe a planet of highly evolved humans exists as referred to in these books.

However a soul always takes birth - as a baby, whether on earth or some other planet. The soul can go from one planet to the other under the power of God. So it is like re-incarnation of a soul is possible in Indraloka.

Swargaloka

The abode of liberated souls (souls that do not have to take birth) is called 'swargaloka'. It is not a planet, but a place in space.

Mrityuloka

The ordinary planets like Earth, where all kinds of souls take birth, good and bad.



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 08:15 AM
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Capitalism, Communism and Veda

The vedic economy is based on private production of commodities, capital goods, and services. State has responsibility of education, security, and justice systems.

But Vedic society does not have private ownership of productive land. Land is given for use only, and king gets tax from goods produced on that land.

So Vedic society does not fit into western models of either capitalism or communism.

Vedic society is based on a simple principle - you get something in return of something (neutral karma). King provides land, so gets taxes. If a person (like artisan) gets no land, he pays no taxes. The maximum tax is fixed by scripture, so unreasonable taxes are not possible. The class system excludes king from commerce. This is good as king does not try to control all productive resources. He has to depend on other classes.

In Vedic system, no trader or industrialist can become more powerful than the king. Alternate power centers are not possible. However there is strong justification for producing quality goods, due to competition and profit motive.



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 08:47 AM
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Vedic economic model is extremely efficient.

It allows best use of available productive land, in addition to sustaining a true meritocracy.

There is good reason to trust Ramayan which depicts Kosala as a very wealthy country. Shri Rama donates 100 million gold and silver coins, 100,000 milch cows, 100,000 other cows, and 100,000 horses on the occasion of his coronation. This donation is very large amount in the modern world - somewhere in the range of 50 billion US dollars.

Kings like Shri Rama regularly donated reseves of treasury (as keeping excess money is against Vedic rules). This would have made everybody in his kingdom quite wealthy and satisfied.

edit on 29-10-2011 by vedatruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by vedatruth
 


What about non-Yogis who claim similar powers?



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by 547000
 


I pity those who believe them.

If a person is foolish enough to believe anything, he cannot be helped.

The Guru (teacher) is made after the student is satisfied, the same way as a teacher takes in a student when satisfied.

If a person has purity in his heart, he will be automatically drawn to the real teacher.



posted on Oct, 29 2011 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by vedatruth
reply to post by ipsedixit
 


I am not claiming to be a know-all. But the Yogis who have seen the past by their power have discarded preach of Gautam Buddha.


These are authority figures whose word you are taking.


You are not getting me. Veda is as hard for me as it is for you. But it is what it is.


I see.


Islam is an anti-Vedic religion.


Are you saying that God is both Vedic and anti-Vedic? That would be like being both happy and sad at the same time. I usually don't think of God as being a complex personality, but I guess if people can be complex, why not God too?


I consider Buddhism as a social engineering experiment rather than a religion.


If one forgets about the meaning of the Buddha's teaching then all one is left with is the social phenomenon.


As I have told time and again - 'yama' and 'niyam' are the basis of Vedic religion. You cannot call a society Vedic until these rules are upheld by political and legal system.


But surely even if these rules are upheld there must be moments when the society is not Vedic and moments when it is Vedic.

Incidentally,are there any Vedic societies or even Vedic communities in the world today?


I stick to my view that Buddha did not attain liberation of soul. I prefer to speak truth rather than lie to appease you or others.


Suspension of judgement is not an option, I take it.

I think that Vedic communities are almost completely impractical in the world as it is today, however Amish and other alternative communities have been set up in small numbers, so maybe similar Verdic communities are possible.

I'm a tolerant person and don't believe that a Vedic community would threaten me in any way. As my teacher said, "be tolerant of the intolerant".



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