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Astronaut vision problems explaining the greys' large eyes?

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posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 09:46 AM
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This article was just released today. It states that 30% to 60% of all astronauts are experiencing eye problems that may lead to blindness if scientists don't find a solution to how this can be avoided and/or corrected.
www.orlandosentinel.com...


According to one NASA survey of about 300 astronauts, nearly 30 percent of those who have flown on space shuttle missions – which usually lasted two weeks -- and 60 percent who've completed six-month shifts aboard the station reported a gradual blurring of eyesight.

Williams put the figure lower -- at roughly 35 percent for station crew -- but did not dispute the severity of the problem, nor the mystery surrounding it. The disorder, similar to an Earth-bound condition called papilledema, is believed to be caused by increased spinal-fluid pressure on the head and eyes due to microgravity, although the exact cause is uncertain.

Oftentimes, the problem goes away once an astronaut returns to Earth. But a recent study by the National Academies noted there had been "some lingering substantial effects on vision," and that astronauts were "not always able to re-qualify for subsequent flights" -- at least not immediately.

Williams declined to discuss specific cases, but acknowledged at least one astronaut never regained normal vision.



"When they [NASA] start going [to] long-distance [destinations] like Mars, you can't end up having a bunch of blind astronauts."


I encourage everyone to take the time to read the article in its entirety. It states that this problem was discovered in 2005 when an unknown astronaut came forward about this vision problems. Seems to me that there may have been a lot more earlier cases, but people were afraid of losing their jobs and considered to be a huge liability.

This is the part of the article that really struck me as significant and got me thinking:


While blindness is the worst-case scenario, the threat of blurred vision is enough that NASA has asked scores of researchers to study the issue and has put special eyeglasses on the space station to help those affected see what they're doing.


Now, considering that we now know that space travel causes eyesight problems, let's consider the large black eyes that grey aliens are always pictured with and reported to have according to witnesses. Some people believe that these aren't eyes at all, but special lenses to protect the eyes. I've always been on the fence about this because looking at the eyes of insects, they have unique eyes that are structured/shaped similarly, so I wasn't convinced by the "special lens" argument. I think I may be changing my mind.

Thoughts?




posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 09:53 AM
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Most abduction reports would seem to suggest there is gravity wherever these grays take people. In the absence of microgravity the effect on the eyes may not happen.

Assuming the grays biology is similar to our own? That's a big assumption I know but I have nothing else to compare to?

Incidentally I hope they sort out this problem for future missions. It could put a dampener on the whole thing, whos going to sign up for a trip to Mars if your going to be blind when you get back?
edit on 20/9/2011 by Grifter81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


if the condition is caused by spinal fluid pressure,how will the glasses help? shouldn't they concentrate on relieving the pressure? its kinda like giving a guy a bandaid,after his arm is cut off!



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by Grifter81
 


Well, at first, I wasn't considering that the greys have biology similar to ours since I was assuming that their eyes were constructed similarly to insects' eyes. Think of the preying mantis and how their eyes are.

Now that I've learned that space travel may inhibit eyesight, I'm leaning more towards the idea that the large black eyes aren't eyes at all, but may be large balck lenses designed to protect their eyes or help them see better.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by reficul
 


I think the glasses are a temporary measure to combat the blurred vision. Its not a cure, just a fix to get them through the mission in the hope that when they return to Earth their eyes go back to normal.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by reficul
 


I agree, but considering that scientists don't know what causes the declining sight, the spinal fluid issue is just a theory of theirs. Sex is believed to cause eyesight problems, too, but these problems have nothing to do with spinal fluid. I think I'm leaning more towards busted blood vessels happening during space travel due to gravitational changes, g forces, or a combination of the two that is causing extreme pressure on the eyes.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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Here's an article about how sugar levels in the blood can change and effect eyesight.
diabetes.webmd.com...

Is it possible for an astronaut's blood sugar to change for some reason and cause his eyesight to go blurry?



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by Afterthought
reply to post by Grifter81
 


Well, at first, I wasn't considering that the greys have biology similar to ours since I was assuming that their eyes were constructed similarly to insects' eyes. Think of the preying mantis and how their eyes are.

Now that I've learned that space travel may inhibit eyesight, I'm leaning more towards the idea that the large black eyes aren't eyes at all, but may be large balck lenses designed to protect their eyes or help them see better.


I suppose its possible. I would be inclined to think that if they were advanced enough to travel here they would have adequate shielding on their ship to combat any radiation/cosmic rays they may encounter, as well as some sort of artificial gravity.

Perhaps their eyes are sensitive to light? Their maybe just sunglasses? You dont hear of many daylight abductions



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by Grifter81
 


You're certainly right about most abductions happening at night. It may be that whatever the issue is, maybe it isn't correctable/avoidable and wearing sunglasses or special eyewear is all one can do. Wouldn't it be wild to discover that even advanced civilizations cannot cure the issues that space travel may cause, so they just have to always wear eye protectors?



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


That would be interesting, it would perhaps mean their not all that far ahead of us after all?



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:21 AM
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Possibly from the vacuum type environment that space has that earth doesn't. It has a tendency to suffocate, your eyes are no exception. Radiation, and due to the fact that there are toxic, alien gasses that your body is not used to.
edit on 20-9-2011 by Heartisblack because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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I would imagine that radiation has something to do with the deterioration of the astronaut's eyes, like prolonged exposure to UV will give you cataracts. The Greys seem to be radiation proof drones designed for space travel, their big bug eyes.....wrap around shades

edit on 20-9-2011 by seabhac-rua because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


ya i can dig that explanatoin better than the fluid one! (nice spellin eh!:@@



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 10:37 AM
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Originally posted by seabhac-rua
, their big bug eyes.....wrap around shades

edit on 20-9-2011 by seabhac-rua because: (no reason given)


Yes, exactly!
Maybe future spacerace sunglasses not only protect the eyes from radiation, but also act as a barrier against outside pressure changes. Almost like a way of preventing the bends in a scuba diver, but for an astronaut's eyes. Since there's no way of slowing down the craft to lower the gs, the glasses would reduce the pressure somehow.




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