It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Death-row inmate Troy Davis Denied Clemency

page: 4
26
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 02:33 PM
link   
reply to post by RoguePhilosopher
 
I wonder how many of those recanted statements were brought about by threats of retaliation?

If the officer were able to speak in his own behalf I imagine he'd demand justice for depriving him of the right to see his children grow up. People that commit crimes of this nature need to be removed from the gene pool. When you have an overly aggressive bull in a herd, you cull him out so he doesn't breed more animals like himself.




posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 02:49 PM
link   
Read this and then tell me if this man should have a chance to get a new trial or not.
There is just too much doubt. Maybe tommorow two innocent men will be dead,
and the murder enjoys his live.

www.amnestyusa.org...
edit on 20-9-2011 by antibyte because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 03:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by UniverSoul


Very sad to hear. No one should be put to death. What right does the government and a group of nobodys on a jury have?
its a sad world we live in, guilty or not two wrongs do not make a right.

QUOTE:
"It is unconscionable that the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles has denied relief to Troy Davis. Allowing a man to be sent to death under an enormous cloud of doubt about his guilt is an outrageous affront to justice," Amnesty International said in a statement Tuesday.

news.blogs.cnn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


You are aware that physical proof of his guilt did exist but was not allowed by the Judge based on a technicality? It's important people know that before criticizing so they are not being dishonest with themselves and others.

I'm also opposed to the death penalty, but the likelihood of this person being innocent is probably non-existent. It was not just some "group of nobody's", it was a Jury. A great deal of the controversy comes from the usual suspects, the Cop Haters who are glad the Cop was murdered. That did not impress anyone during the multiple Appeals.

I'm with you on the Death Penalty but have no desire to lie or delude myself. If I have to stretch the truth or ignore facts to make my point, I'm not worth listening too.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 03:33 PM
link   
Finally, justice is ready to be served out to this POS.

Eyewitness statements and testimony become less and less accurate the more time has passed from the initial event, that’s why courts are usually dismissive when witnesses change their testimony 20 years after the event. Interestingly enough, Larry Young the man Davis was savagely pistol whipping before brutally slaying officer Mark MacPhail, stands firm in his testimony.

Contrary to rumor, there was physical evidence tying Davis to the murder. It wasn’t presented at trial because the police didn’t obtain a proper search warrant for Davis mother's home, where bloody clothes worn by Davis the night he shot not one, but two men, were found. This evidence was presented at one of his appeals and damaged his case very severely.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 03:59 PM
link   
So there was evidence .... shure, but useless evidence.


In 2008, the State submitted to the Board a report by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) that purportedly showed the presence of blood on a pair of shorts recovered from Davis’ home in the days after the murder. Davis’ attorneys were unaware of the existence of this report. Following the Board’s denial of clemency in 2008, a DNA and serology expert reviewed the full GBI report. The federal court in 2010, after reviewing the new expert analysis, concluded that “the shorts in no way linked Mr. Davis to the murder of Officer MacPhail,” and found that “it is not even clear that the substance was blood.” The court concluded that even if the substance was blood, it “could have belonged to Mr. Davis, Mr. Larry Young, Officer MacPhail, or even [could] have gotten onto the shorts entirely apart from the events of that night.” Therefore, the value of this item as evidence has been thoroughly challenged.


www.naacp.org...



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 04:27 PM
link   
reply to post by antibyte
 


The parole board found it more than convincing.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 04:36 PM
link   


Larry Young the man Davis was savagely pistol whipping before brutally slaying officer Mark MacPhail, stands firm in his testimony.


Also not the case, not much left ... doubt maybe ?


Antoine Williams, Larry Young and Monty Holmes also stated in affidavits that their earlier testimony implicating Davis had been coerced by strong-arm police tactic


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 04:39 PM
link   
Death-row inmate Troy Davis' victim DENIED CLEMENCY!

Enough said.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 04:47 PM
link   
The funniest thing (although I don't consider a thread about a man about to be murdered funny) about this thread is I see a lot of posters who are against all sorts of government intervention, taxes, etc., but are perfectly fine with the government killing people.
Talk about a double standard.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 04:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by SirMike
reply to post by antibyte
 


The parole board found it more than convincing.


The parole board? The man was never up for parole. He's about to be murdered by the state.
And yes in this glorious state, no one has been given clemency in over 33 years.
Why start now?
State sanctioned murder is a ok
But don't raise my property taxes by $10.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 06:26 PM
link   
reply to post by the owlbear
 


The parole board does more than parole prisoners, they also hear appeals.

Deny ignorance, don't embrace it.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Kryties
Won't be long before the bloodthirsty, pro-execution lot are in here - salivating over somebody else's death despite strong evidence proving this man should be given clemency.

To those people, executions are like their daily hit of heroin.

It always amazes me that there are those individuals in the world who celebrate the death of another. I get sickened by the pro-execution types. I absolutely despise the death penalty. We should abolish it. There is way to much room for error. Like someone previously said, 12 people sentenced this man to death. Humans are flawed. Many have lost their life only to later be proven innocent. Once mistake is far too many. I wish we wouldn't do this to our fellow humans. We suck.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by the owlbear
The funniest thing (although I don't consider a thread about a man about to be murdered funny) about this thread is I see a lot of posters who are against all sorts of government intervention, taxes, etc., but are perfectly fine with the government killing people.
Talk about a double standard.


Great point, and it is my one complaint with our current death penalty. I don't like the "clinical" aspect, and I don't like appointing a 3rd party to carry it out. We are indeed sanctioning murder if an uninvolved 3rd party pulls the switch.

I think it should be up to the family to decide the fate, and if they choose death, they have to pull the switch themselves. If the family doesn't have the stomach for it, then it doesn't happen.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:08 PM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 

I agree with everything you have said. The punishment should fit the crime, if a person is murdered by being beat to death then so be the punishment. I also agree it sould be a family member that decides whether death penalty applies or not and a family member that carries out the execution.

I am sick and tired of hearing about "humane" death sentences, if we are so concerned about humane then do away with it, otherwise kill them as they killed and end this crap of 20 years on death row. If found guilty, give them their appeal within a year to 18 months then cap them. This "putting them to sleep" crap is really quite disturbing.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:14 PM
link   
Back around 2005 I was put on Jury Duty. For the record, it was a great experience and I met a lot of interesting people. Everyone should do it at least once!


Anyway, I got picked for Jury selection on a murder trial. This father and son had murdered a security guard. The Prosecution called me to the stand and they asked me first, "Would you be opposed to Life in prison, life without the possibility of parole or the death penalty?" I didn't know if I could separate their answer so I said yes. Then they asked me another question that I don't recall, followed by, "Would you be willing to sentence these men to death?" To which I said no. The Prosecutor was livid and screaming to the Judge that I had previously answered yes and demanded to know why I changed my response. The Judge asked me and I told him, "Your Honor, the Prosecutor asked me three questions together. If separated, I am willing to do Life, Life without Parole but not the death penalty. It isn't my place to play God and be responsible for a man's death."

The Prosecution asked if I could be excused. The Defense asked the Judge if I could remain.
The Judge removed me from the case.

I'm glad I didn't get stuck on the case cuz one of them did get the death sentence. (btw, I never knew there was a huge conspiracy in this murder!! Definitely thread worthy!)


On September 28, 2005, a Tulsa, Oklahoma, jury sentenced Wade Lay to death and his son Christopher Lay to life in prison without parole. Both men were convicted two days earlier of murdering security guard Kenneth Anderson during a failed robbery at a Tulsa bank in 2004.


Fa ther and Son Convicted on Bank Robbery, Murder Charges for Anti-Government Plot

Anyway, I don't believe in these wars. I don't believe in the death penalty. Rick Perry makes me sick because he has had one man who was most certainly innocent executed and possibly another recently. I can't fathom why people cheered when he announced the number of inmates that have been executed in Texas. It's disgusting.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:22 PM
link   
reply to post by Kryties
 





One that doesn't involve juries, judges or the legal system as a whole deciding whether somebody lives or dies. It is barbaric, frequently proven wrong (execution of innocents) and quite frankly the only people who uphold such a system are psychopaths who enjoy seeing death to satisfy their blood lust.


Wow!

So who does decide then?.....no juries?.....no judges?.......no legal system?

What is your solution?



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by getreadyalready

Originally posted by the owlbear
The funniest thing (although I don't consider a thread about a man about to be murdered funny) about this thread is I see a lot of posters who are against all sorts of government intervention, taxes, etc., but are perfectly fine with the government killing people.
Talk about a double standard.


Great point, and it is my one complaint with our current death penalty. I don't like the "clinical" aspect, and I don't like appointing a 3rd party to carry it out. We are indeed sanctioning murder if an uninvolved 3rd party pulls the switch.

I think it should be up to the family to decide the fate, and if they choose death, they have to pull the switch themselves. If the family doesn't have the stomach for it, then it doesn't happen.


I still don't think the government should be involved in the "who lives, who dies" business at all. Put em in a cell for the rest of their lives, but no government has the right to kill its own citizens. We think we are so advanced, yet some would love violent deaths for stupid acts to be public spectacle not unlike the unwashed masses of old. What's next, more witch trials?



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by the owlbear

What's next, more witch trials?


Man I hope so, maybe then I can get rid of my ex!



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:35 PM
link   
reply to post by the owlbear
 


What's the point of living in a box for the rest of one's life? Is that really better than being dead? Is life all about quantity and no concern for quality?

Life in prison is equal to death in my opinion, maybe even worse. Can you imagine 15 minute snapshots of your kids growing up on the other side of some glass where you see them 15 minutes every couple of months? That seems like the definition of torture to me. We don't allow cruel and unusual punishment. What do you think it does to a person to spend 2 days preparing for death, making amends with your god, and then marching down that long hallway, only to have the execution stayed at the last minute, and then repeating the same thing 3 years later? Cruel and Unusual if you ask me. Death is merciful.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:41 PM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


And a lot cheaper on the taxpayers, some of whom may very well be relatives of the victim.

My own feeling on the matter is that if someone murdered one of my family members I would rather them be released or executed just because I don't want to have to live with the fact that while I'm out bustin but to make ends meet, part of my tax dollars that are forcebly taken from me are going to support the lowlife that killed my loved one.

At least if they were set free justice would still be served eventually.



new topics

top topics



 
26
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join