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Help with two destructive dogs.

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posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 03:38 AM
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Hey everyone, so I'm pretty much at my wit's end with my dogs right now. One is 2 years old and the other is 5 months old. My girlfriend and I have had massive amounts of trouble with the older one in the past but she has since calmed down (somewhat). Our main issue is their destructive tendencies, they wreck our things whenever we leave the house for any period of time.

I work night shifts mostly and my girlfriend works evenings so the dogs are only left alone for a few hours (1-4) before the gf comes home. In the past our older dog has chewed the wires on expensive electronics in our house, torn up clothing (frequently), scratched deep gouges into walls and doors, and she has even eaten molding right off of doorways. She has since calmed down some but becomes destructive when left alone. The younger dog is also developing this trait. They get exercise, have attended obedience training, and have been properly socialized. We've bought them tons of toys, kongs, and treats to keep them busy whenever we leave but to no avail. We have invested in Dog Appeasing Pheromone diffusers to put around the house, behavioral books and training, and even anti-anxiety medication. I really don't want to go down the medication route again since the change in personality is clear when on it. I have no idea what else to do though, summer is a blessing in that we can leave them on our sheltered deck when we're out. However, winter is fast approaching and that will soon eliminate that option.

I love my dogs and do not want to get rid of them but this is becoming a headache (an expensive one at that). So have any of you had an experience similar to ours? I am very familiar with dogs since growing up we have five of them, but I'm at a loss with these two.



edit on 17-9-2011 by Sentience365 because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 03:53 AM
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www.metpet.com...

Sounds like your dogs are suffering from anxiety.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 03:56 AM
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I had a similar experience with a dog chewing cables.
Was a little messy but I coated all exposed cables with chilli powder, it worked quite quickly!!



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by Sentience365
 


desex
train
set boundaries
walk or excersice as much as possible
they will get better as they get older



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:01 AM
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Do you now which one for definite is chewing all the stuff? Is it possible it's just the young one? If so it should stop pretty soon.

I have a two year old jack russell. She's stopped chewing my kitchen cupboards just a short while ago but still pees when someone talks to her and wont ever sit still.

So far we've managed to teach her two words "bed", and "pee". She doesn't understand "sit", "lie down" or anything else.

It's kind of a nightmare but she's really cute, loves me to bits, and at bedtime she pulls her blanket over herself and pops her nose out and looks like a little Bambie princess wearing her veil. AWWWW!!

However, throughout the day she reminds us of Donkey from Shrek.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:09 AM
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reply to post by TsukiLunar
 


They definitely are but we've never been able to do anything about it. We've tried to make things as comfortable as we can for them but nothing seems to make them placid.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:11 AM
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reply to post by waveydavey
 


I've done this also and it has worked, just for the cables though, We can't coat our walls, clothes and doors in chili powder haha.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:12 AM
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reply to post by wigit
 


Pretty sure it's still the older one doing the majority of the damage. I know because I see some foreign objects in her poop every so often.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by UniverSoul
 


We've pretty much done all of these, I guess we'll just have to wait a few years unfortunately.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:14 AM
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reply to post by Sentience365
 
Have you bought them some toys to chew up?



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:16 AM
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reply to post by TsukiLunar
 


They've got more toys than any dog could ever want. I think we may have honestly tried every single thing to get these dogs to feel occupied.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:23 AM
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reply to post by Sentience365
 


Take them to a trainer then. He will be able to train the dogs on how to behave when you are not around. Or look up ways to do it yourself. If all else fail, you are just going to have to put them outside when you are not around. They just do not know how to deal with the anxiety of you leaving them, so they chew stuff up. Until you can deal with the root of the problem(the anxiety) they wont stop. More than that, it causes the dogs great stress and isnt healthy.

Contact a vet or trainer for advice. They would probably be willing to give it for free.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:27 AM
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I have 2 dogs, a miniture Dachs and a Bernese. The Dachs was never destructive but it would p#ss everywhere when we left the house. So we put a cage in the hallway and when we go out and at night the Dachs goes in there, problem solved.

The Bernese is 2 and was quite destructive. I housetrained it well and it never goes to toilet inside but damn does it chew on stuff if you let it. When you go out make sure all doors are locked and leave it in teh hallway, this cut out most of the problems. The Bernese can still go upstairs, jump up and open one of the doors, usually one of the kid's, and then knocks over bins and tears up anything paper. He's grown out of chewing on wood stuff - this comes from teething and many dogs will chew up to 18 months.

So be strict on where you leave the dogs when you're out and at night. Reduce what they can destroy in this place. Cage the dogs if they are small enough. Some dogs just don't respond well to training in this respect so you have to alter their environment when you're not there to control them. We still have daily issues with teh Bernese, but they aren't super destructive. He will grab clothes left out but doesn't normally rip them, generally he does it to get attention. He thinks paper is a toy and because he's so big he can see papers left out on the table and will sometimes jump up and grab them. This is something we have to catch in teh act and give him a smack across the node. If it's me I only have to raise my hand and and my voice and he'll release but he knows he can get away with it with the kids. This is mostly because the kids will give him a treat to entice him to release something. This is something I'm trying to stamp out as it encourages bad behaviour. But I digress.

Be strict on where you leave the dogs when you're out and at night. Reduce what they can destroy in this space. Cage the dogs if they are small enough. So many problems can be avoided with proper cage training.

Good luck!



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:29 AM
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reply to post by TsukiLunar
 


We've taken them to a trainer already, they learned a lot of obedience stuff from their experience but no anxiety help. We can't leave them outside for much longer due to the cold weather. The vet gave us anti-anxiety medication for them in the past and although I didn't like it it may have to happen again, thanks for your advice.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by Logman
 


Oh trust me friend I've tried cage training with the older dog, it was a f'***ing nightmare. She would crap all over the cage then roll in it, by the time we came home it would be everywhere, on walls near the cage and all over the ground. Crate training never worked out for her but the young one hasn't had it so that might be a road we could go down. I know all about your pee issues too, we just barely got our younger dog to stop peeing on the carpet. I actually had to buy a steam cleaner because it got so bad.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 04:57 AM
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The Dachs was the same when he was a puppy. I abandoned the crate training due to crap everywhere. I started putting him in the cage again when he was about 3 and he doesn't crap or pee in it any more. Caging him as an adult dog and leaving them both in the hallway worked for us - although we still have issues. Do you not have a hallway you can leave them in?



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 05:06 AM
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reply to post by Logman
 


We have a few hallways we can leave them in, or we could just leave them in the kitchen (tiled floors make for an easier clean up). I'll bring out the cage and try it with the older one again, we'll see if she takes to it like your dog did.

Thanks for your help!



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 05:17 AM
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Try out a few places, find out which works best. You need to find where they are most comfortable and can do no damage. For us the downstairs hallway was the obvious choice as the Bernese sleeps on the tiled floor of the porch as it's cool. Whatever you decide, confining them somehow is the key. What type of dogs are they and how old is each one?



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 05:24 AM
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leave some talk radio on for them. nothing too exciting though.

a quiet channel. just conversation.



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 05:26 AM
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reply to post by Logman
 


Cool that you have a Bernese mountain dog, they're really friendly. The older one (2 years old) is a black lab/golden shepherd mix and the younger one (5 months old) is a black lab/miniature collie mix.



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