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Are cell phone phones mini transmittors?

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posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 09:45 AM
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I have a question regarding cell phones. Are they mini transmittors and can they be traced by sattelite? If so why can't they trace the movements of terroist groups by using this technology




posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 09:48 AM
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They can and have. The catch is you have to know who exactly you are looking for. Also the target has to be foolish enough to use a tappable/traceable technology when they are known to the enemy.

[edit on 24-8-2004 by Kano]



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 10:00 AM
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They can be traced, but not by satellite.
They pinpoint the whereabouts of a cellphone by comparing its distance to the several antennas needed for a cellphone to be able to work.
Kind of the same princip used by the GPS-system, just on the ground and with antennas instead of satellites.
If youre going to commit a crime, it would be a good idea to turn off your cellphone first...



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by Hellmutt
They can be traced, but not by satellite.


I vaguely remember that they can indeed be traced from satellite, if the antenna on that sattelite is good enough.



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 10:01 AM
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Of course cellphones are transmitters! How else would they work otherwise?

You can trace the whereabouts of a cellphone by using the basestations and cells where the phone has been active. Where the cell is small, like in a large city you can pinpoint the location to a certain extent.

AFAIK, you cannot trace regular cellphones through satelite.

// k



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 11:23 AM
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Cell phones, whenever turned on are constantly sending and receiving (TRANSMITTING) signals to and from the various towers in their vicinity. As one poster pointed out, they CAN trace your location the same way that GPS satellites work, but using antenai on the ground. This principle is known as WAAS (Wide Area Augmentation System) and is used for tracking ships and aircraft on final approach to align them with runways. However, in order to TRACK a cellphone, one must be familiar with the FCC ID number on the phone in order to track it. Just as aicraft transmit a transponder number which corresponds to a specific flight, the FCC ID number denotes a specific cell phone and is completely UNRELATED to the cell phone number and is completely unique to each individual cell phone. Hope that answers your question.



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 11:47 AM
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Yes thank you! But it raises more concerns, for instance if you knew how to trace and follow transmission from a particular phone and you knew that phone was in close proximity to some one you wanted to harm wouldent it form sort a a bulls eye so to speak? Don't private security companies and secret service use cell phones?



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 03:08 PM
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You can't indentify a unique phone unless you have access to the base station, or set up a fake base station.

The fact that it's possible to set up a fake base station is a real security concern. Although, the same principle that allows you to find the source of a radio transmission also allows authorities to detect fake base stations.

The real security concern with cellphones at the moment is bluetooth. I was reading the other day that people have demonstrated the ability to hack bluetooth enabled phones from up to a kilometer away.



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 03:18 PM
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Now that cell phones are equipped with GPS technology they can in effect be tracked by satellite insofar as the GPS signal is transmitted by the satellite and received by the cellphone. The location of a user is recorded by the cell phone carrier.

A cellphone is more than a transmitter, it is a radio transceiver. Spooky stuff, huh?

[edit on 04/8/24 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 04:19 PM
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Whats even more spooky is that they can send a homeseeking missile after that phone when pinpointed.



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 04:21 AM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
Now that cell phones are equipped with GPS technology they can in effect be tracked by satellite insofar as the GPS signal is transmitted by the satellite and received by the cellphone. The location of a user is recorded by the cell phone carrier.

A cellphone is more than a transmitter, it is a radio transceiver. Spooky stuff, huh?

[edit on 04/8/24 by GradyPhilpott]


I wouldn't call this "tracked by satelite", since the GPS systems only *transmits* data for a GPS-receiver so it can "see" it's own position.

AFAIK, the satelites themselves don't give sh*t about and cannot IMHO track GPS-receivers on the ground.


And no, for the cellphone company to "see" the GPS-postion the cellpone itself must transmit this info tp the provider. YOu want to track a cellphone you must proably use the basestations and their "cells", to be able to see where your phone is.


Actually, you can use several basestations to pinpoint a cellphone *to some extent* (as I said in an earlier reply), but no GPS is involved.
// k

[edit on 25-8-2004 by kickass]



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 01:16 PM
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Originally posted by kickass

I wouldn't call this "tracked by satelite", since the GPS systems only *transmits* data for a GPS-receiver so it can "see" it's own position.


I wouldn't say it either. I said that "in effect."


And no, for the cellphone company to "see" the GPS-postion the cellpone itself must transmit this info tp the provider. YOu want to track a cellphone you must proably use the basestations and their "cells", to be able to see where your phone is.
On some phones the GPS on, is default. Others it is not. I keep mine on all the time because I don't care who knows where I am. In fact, I desire it.



Actually, you can use several basestations to pinpoint a cellphone *to some extent* (as I said in an earlier reply), but no GPS is involved.
// k
True enough.


[edit on 04/8/25 by GradyPhilpott]



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