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The moon's north pole imaged in stunning detail for the very 1st time !

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posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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I don't know about you guys but this latest lunar image courtesy of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) in my opinion is nothing short of visually stunning ... not to mention that this is the very 1st time that I have EVER seen any photo of the north pole, let alone one as clear and detailed as this one.

Over the period of one month during the northern lunar summer, LROC snapped 983 individual images which were then combined into a mosaic resulting in the following image.
Hopefully, it'll be possible for LROC to do something similar and produce an equally detailed image of the moon's south pole.

As a curiousity ... I find that the longer I stare at the image that there's (in my opinion) a counter-clockwise spiral optical effect that seems to draw my attention inwards towards the central crater complex.


Anyway, enjoy ...




edit on 11/9/11 by tauristercus because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/9/11 by tauristercus because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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Very cool pic, I was thinking it was going clockwise at first and then I saw what you meant



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by LestatG
 


Sweet. I see what you mean about the counter-clockwise effect. Time to save pic, hit zoom, and start looking for those pesky alien bases



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


I noted and was struck by the spiral effect even before reading your comments. Food for thought indeed.

Thank you for posting



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:42 AM
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This is the best thing they're able to achieve in terms of resolution and detail after what .. 60 years after they claim to have *landed* on the surface of this thing ? I bet you can snap a better picture with an i-phone through a 100$ telescope if the north pole would face earth.

This is infamy.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:45 AM
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Originally posted by H1ght3chHippie
This is the best thing they're able to achieve in terms of resolution and detail after what .. 60 years after they claim to have *landed* on the surface of this thing ? I bet you can snap a better picture with an i-phone through a 100$ telescope if the north pole would face earth.

This is infamy.

I agree with you completely that by now you'd think we'd have ultra-ultra-ultra crisp hi-res images ... but until that time (ever) comes, this is the best we're going to get unfortunately



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:49 AM
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I thought that I will be able to see a very close up pic of the moon with small objects distinguishable from each other. I may be expecting too much from NASA.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:50 AM
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I notice that the lower 1/3 of the moon (from the 4-o'clock to the 8-o'clock position in that image) has significantly less impact craters. Is it because that portion of the moon faces Earth?

Cool image!

S&F


edit on 11-9-2011 by Aggie Man because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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HELLOOOOO !!!
IS IT HOLLOW ?



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 10:19 AM
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The black spot looks like you could enter the moon. Whoa, I may have spent too much time reading ATS. However, perhaps it really is hollow. I am sad the moon isn't made of cheese after all. There is much we do not know or aren't told. Someday, we may see and have more knowledge.
Hope



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 10:22 AM
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here's what space.com is saying about the spiral effect


The craters around the pole appear to spiral out from it. According to Mark Robinson, principle investigator of the LRO team based at Arizona State University, this is an optical illusion.

"Imagine a series of very narrow pie slices collected 12 times each day, one after another," Robinson told Life's Little Mysteries, a sister site to SPACE.com. "It takes roughly 360 slices to fill in the whole pie. Each day the sun direction is progressing around the moon, thus the direction that the sun is striking the surface changes. So the shadow directions slowly progress around the moon, thus leading to the illusion."


source


also here is a topographic map within 5° (much tighter image) of the Moon's north pole created from data collected by the Kaguya laser altimeter for comparison


source

thanks for the share sure is rugged and cratered up there!

edit on 9/11/2011 by iforget because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by iforget
 


It might be interesting to process out the shadows which are responsible for the spiral effect, and see if the pattern still suggests a spiral. If so, this would imply that the moon once had a planetary spin.

You're right, it's very beautiful. S&F
edit on 11-9-2011 by mistermonculous because: Intended to make a joke, realized I might be taken seriously. Uh, just joking about that planetary spin thing.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 10:55 AM
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Originally posted by mistermonculous
reply to post by iforget
 


It might be interesting to process out the shadows which are responsible for the spiral effect, and see if the pattern still suggests a spiral. If so, this would imply that the moon once had a planetary spin.

You're right, it's very beautiful. S&F
edit on 11-9-2011 by mistermonculous because: Intended to make a joke, realized I might be taken seriously. Uh, just joking about that planetary spin thing.


By " moon once had a planetary spin" are you saying the moon doesn't rotate? It does rotate.
curious.astro.cornell.edu...
If you meant something else altogether...I'll just wander off...



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 11:06 AM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


The craters at the "North Pole" are interesting. First off, there are an awful lot of them. Also, they seem to be "normal" impact craters which implies the moon has been struck often from "above" (if that word even has any context here). I am no astronomer but I assume if they call this area the North Pole it roughly lines up with Earth's North or North Pole.

Do asteroids and/or comets typically come from the "North"? If so, wouldn't the same hold true for impacts on Earth? Or Mars? Do we see evidence of that on Mars too? If not, does that mean that the moon's poles have rotated at some point in the past?

Can anyone with more knowledge on this topic shed any light on this? Or put another way, I am desperately seeking a paleontologist....err....I mean astronomer.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 11:11 AM
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Yeah, un-funny.

Still a beautiful image, though.

edit on 11-9-2011 by mistermonculous because: Flurp.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


I have heard it said that the moon is a giant "satellite" (ship). Does anyone else see all the evenly spaced segments around the diameter area? Does a celestial body form so perfectly proportioned?




posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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reply to post by Turkenstein
 


Sorry to bust your bubble, buts its a MOSAIC




posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by H1ght3chHippie
This is the best thing they're able to achieve in terms of resolution and detail after what .. 60 years after they claim to have *landed* on the surface of this thing ?
No, the best photos have a resolution of 50 cm per pixel.


I bet you can snap a better picture with an i-phone through a 100$ telescope if the north pole would face earth.
Having photographed the Moon (but not through a 100$ telescope), I'm sure you're wrong.



This is infamy.
No, just lack of knowledge of this subject, but you can learn.

edit on 11/9/2011 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Armap - What do you make of the heavy concentration of craters at the North Pole? Is that a normal occurrence on other planets too? Does Mars have a concentration of craters at it's North Pole too? Shouldn't it if asteroids & comets often come from that direction? The moon doesn't have a monopoly on being a target for these things I assume.

For some reason, this photo with all of those craters clustered there strikes me as being...I don't know....incongruous maybe?



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by Riffrafter
 


The moon is tidally locked with earth, and earth rotates at about a 23.4º angle to the orbital plane (hence, seasons). So the moon is tilted also and it's true 'north' is 23.4º off of its north pole. This illustration may help to visualize this, with a kicker explanation on eclipses.





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