It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

My grandfathers Mason apron

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:40 PM
link   
Note to mods, I did the best I could to determine how to go about posting. I couldn't choose the forum. If you could redirect if needed I would appreciate it.

This has long bothered me. I thought these were secretive items.
My grandmother unwrapped and showed me my grandfathers Mason apron when I was a child - maybe 11 or 12. I am a female. We did it as a "secret" and she was a nervous wreck we would be caught. This event happened when he was preparing for ceramony, or promotion??

Why would she have done this and what did it mean?
I know little of the Mason world since my grandparents passed long ago - and I don't know a Mason to ask, or even if this is a controversial question. If anyone would share the meaning of this I would appreciate it. I am now 46 years old, and I will admit this memory has surfaced and begun to bother me.
edit on 9-9-2011 by LittleBirdSaid because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:55 PM
link   
reply to post by LittleBirdSaid
 


The little aprons those Masons wear symbolise those similar to the ancient Egyptian priests; all my family members who wore theirs are quite beautiful and in royal blue and gold. Can't tell you more, it's a secret



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 12:04 AM
link   
My father was a 32nd and at his funeral the apron and tools were used in a masonic rite as a part of the service. All I remember from back then was it was a very interesting service.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 12:18 AM
link   
I have all my wife's grandfathers Mason stuff right here with me.
The apron,the book everything.
Nothing secret or really special about it,other than sentimental.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 12:19 AM
link   
reply to post by LittleBirdSaid
 


May I ask why does the resurfacing of this memory bother you?

I am just curious.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 12:22 AM
link   
reply to post by LittleBirdSaid
 


I have my apron in a drawer to keep it safe. Will eventually frame it.

My daughter and wife have seen it umpteen times. In NO way do I feel violated.


I'm proud of it. It took A LOT of work to earn it.

I try to impress this on my daughter to strive to improve and work hard.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 03:47 AM
link   
The aprons are given when you pass the 3rd degree and become a Master Mason the highest level of Masonry at a Blue Lodge. A lot of Masons are buried with there apron and tools so the can serve the great architect of the universe in the after life. It is a very special item for a mason that shows to other Masons your achievement of master mason. its not really a secret item no one can see. I have shown mine to my wife son and friends no rules against showing off your accomplishment. Your wife would defiantly see it because she would need to know where it is in case of death. If you wished to have a Masonic funeral. Most of the guys in my lodge want to be buried with there apron and tools.
hope this helps you understand the apron a little more.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 06:27 AM
link   

Originally posted by pez1975
The aprons are given when you pass the 3rd degree and become a Master Mason the highest level of Masonry at a Blue Lodge.


Actually, you receive it as an Entered Apprentice in the 1st degree in my jurisdiction, its presentation being accompanied by a brief lecture. You are then taught to wear it by the Senior Deacon.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 06:30 AM
link   
reply to post by LittleBirdSaid
 


I remember my grandad's apron too. It was white with embroidered bits and had gold metal spirally fringing. He told me they were real gold or gold plated, or maybe he meant the embroidery.?? It was pretty messed up because it was soaked at some point during some flood or other many years before.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 06:33 AM
link   
reply to post by pez1975
 


actually, it's given to you when you are innitiated and get your first degree. It's a beautiful speach that is given at the time it's presented.
Here is a thread that explains much more of it's significance.


One of the first actions of a newly made brother is the investiture of the Lambskin. It is probably the most single recognized symbol of Freemasonry besides that of the Square and Compasses. In each of the degrees the Senior Warden instructs the brother on how to wear the apron correctly. Why an apron? Why is the Apron square? Why is it white? Why are there different versions of the blue border? How come Aprons don't look the same?

source

I have no idea why anyone would fear looking at the apron, unless is was put with other items meant to be private. It is worn at public ceremonies as well as private meetings. (not the original you are given usually, just a copy the lodge has, the original is usually kept safe for the masons final journey.)



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 08:02 AM
link   
I remember being a kid (10-11) and seeing my grandfather's Masonic Apron. When he passed my grandmother gave it to us along with his Masonic ring. Maybe it'll be a free pass to an underground bunker when the world goes to high Hell.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 08:05 AM
link   
I'll see if I can post a picture as well, but my mom has a hot plate with "die schwarze sonne"(the black sun) symbol on it. It's a known nazi occult symbol and that hot plate just freaks me out. No body uses it.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 08:35 AM
link   

Originally posted by pez1975
The aprons are given when you pass the 3rd degree and become a Master Mason the highest level of Masonry at a Blue Lodge.


Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus
Actually, you receive it as an Entered Apprentice in the 1st degree in my jurisdiction, its presentation being accompanied by a brief lecture. You are then taught to wear it by the Senior Deacon.


Originally posted by network dude
actually, it's given to you when you are innitiated and get your first degree. It's a beautiful speach that is given at the time it's presented.
See, here's where Masonry differs a bit from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In my state, in the first degree you're taught how to wear it by the Sr. Warden, but you aren't actually given your own, nice, ceremonial apron until after you've gotten the lecture at the end of the Master's degree. The apron worn by the candidate in the first two degrees is either a regular cloth lodge apron, or an old leather apron that is kept with the working tools and other props needed for the degrees.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 08:44 AM
link   
In our Lodge we are lend new members aprons until they become MM, right now mine only has two blue rosettes on it. I'm off to the Lodge now for a practice, we have 1st, 2nd and 3rd, degrees and discuss Step up night.

Off the East,


and we have a fully stocked bar too



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 09:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by Sauron
and we have a fully stocked bar too
Bastard. On the other hand, we've got brothers who are bar owners, and it's generally nicer to get my refreshing beverage served to me by a cute waitress at one of their establishments than by Bro. Bubba.
edit on 2011.9.10 by JoshNorton because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 09:51 AM
link   

Originally posted by LittleBirdSaid
This has long bothered me. I thought these were secretive items.
My grandmother unwrapped and showed me my grandfathers Mason apron when I was a child - maybe 11 or 12. I am a female. We did it as a "secret" and she was a nervous wreck we would be caught. This event happened when he was preparing for ceramony, or promotion??

Why would she have done this and what did it mean?
I know little of the Mason world since my grandparents passed long ago - and I don't know a Mason to ask, or even if this is a controversial question.
Nothing controversial, and nothing secret. Now, maybe your grandfather was a "don't mess with my stuff" kind of guy. I didn't know him, obviously. But there's nothing in Masonic teachings or ritual that says the apron has to stay hidden. As others have said, it usually gets tucked in a drawer and only pulled out for special occasions, award ceremonies, officer installations or funerals might all be appropriate, depending on the circumstances. If your grandmother was nervous, it may be because she thought she was violating a trust in showing it to you. But none of the symbols in Masonry are we told to conceal. The only "secrets" are the handshakes and passwords, really.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 11:18 AM
link   
As stated above . there is nothing secretive concerning our aprons . My wife has mine so she will know where it is upon my death . She has taken it out many times and showed her friends , my only stipulation when she does this is that it remains clean and unsullied . I can care less who sees my apron .



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 12:17 PM
link   

Originally posted by EvolEric
reply to post by LittleBirdSaid
 


May I ask why does the resurfacing of this memory bother you?

I am just curious.


Exactly why I posted. Because I do not like secrets and know nothing of secret socieities, and this felt at the time like a secret. I have no one to ask, and this forum has been helpful. Thank you.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 12:20 PM
link   
reply to post by LittleBirdSaid
 


There is nothing wrong with your Grandmother sharing this with you, and the only reason for secrecy, would be if your Grandfather didn't like it being fiddled with. Most Masons treasure their leather lambskin aprons.

Hopefully your Grandfather was buried in his apron, but if not, and if it is still around the family somewhere, you should try to make sure it is passed down to a male descendent that is interested in Freemasonry.

If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask. The Masons in this forum are extremely forth coming, nice, polite, and knowledgeable.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 12:25 PM
link   
reply to post by pez1975
 


Thank you, I do know he was buried in his apron, and his brother and nephew who were also Masons flew down and special arrangements were made. I don't remember his service. I think because it was very simple graveside service, but the men went the day before and he was buried in his apron, and ring.




top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join