The Price of U.S. Govt. debt Is At A 200-Year High

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posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 10:34 PM
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It´s a matter of historical record.



This chart only goes to 8/26/11 and now the 10-year note yield is at 1.91. So, it´s a 200-year low as yield is concerned and conversely a 200-year high in the price of the debt instrument. So much for the economic collapse that supposedly has been imminent for the last 30 years. The dollar has supposedly been at death´s door for years and now in the year of the Lord 2011 US govt. dollar denominated debt is at the highest price since the 1800´s. Isn´t ir remarkable. Thoughts?
edit on 9-9-2011 by galdur because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 10:37 PM
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No argument from me...

Source might be nice though.

I find it interesting that despite the vast swathes of evidence, the government persists in telling people that it's business as usual. Even the acknowledgement of a crisis in Obama's recent speech was only in reference to jobs... and the problem goes much, much deeper than that.

The sad part is... we're not even halfway down the rabbit hole. We've barely made it inside the entrance.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 10:45 PM
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reply to post by Awen24
 


Source? How about a freaking clue?

Bonds trade at price. Thus, price and yield move in opposite directions. The lower the yield, the higher the price of the debt instrument. This high prices of US govt. debt were maybe seen 200-300 years ago, I only have info reaching to 1880, see chart.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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I mean, after all the hype of world ending asteroids and elusive brown dwarfs and human eating aliens and impending mad max scenerios and yada yada yada freeze fried food blah, blah and the price of money (debt) is at a 200-year high presently. Isn´t there something wrong with this picture?



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 05:25 AM
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Originally posted by galdur
reply to post by Awen24
 


Source? How about a freaking clue?

Bonds trade at price. Thus, price and yield move in opposite directions. The lower the yield, the higher the price of the debt instrument. This high prices of US govt. debt were maybe seen 200-300 years ago, I only have info reaching to 1880, see chart.



...like I said, you get no argument from me - but the protocol on here is that if you're going to embed a chart, you add the source. I agree wholeheartedly with your assessment.



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 08:01 AM
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It's a bubble.

2nd.





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