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US Military Plane Forced Down By North Korean Electronic Attack

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posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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US Military Plane Forced Down By North Korean Electronic Attack


www.myfoxny.com

SEOUL - A US military reconnaissance plane came under electronic attack from North Korea and had to make an emergency landing during a major military exercise in March, a political aide said Friday.

The aide said the plane suffered disturbance to its GPS system due to jamming signals from the North's southwestern cities of Haeju and Kaesong as it was taking part in the annual US-South Korea drill, Key Resolve.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.physorg.com
english.chosun.com




posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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There have been a few reports here and there of North Korea developing a jamming device. Apparently those reports are now confirmed.

Aside from the US military flight mentioned above the attack also effected South Korean naval ships, commercial flights and even mobile uses.

The attack came during a joint South Korea / US drill that the North didn't like.

North Korea isn't exactly known for being high tech. If they have this it makes you wonder what other nations have. It also begs the question of what response, if any, there will be to this?

www.myfoxny.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 



North Korea isn't exactly known for being high tech. If they have this it makes you wonder what other nations have. It also begs the question of what response, if any, there will be to this?


Actually, I could be mistaken, but I think most of the high-tech missile guidance systems are developed in N. Korea. Their tech is top notch, but sanctions keep them from producing anything themselves.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:41 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 



North Korea isn't exactly known for being high tech. If they have this it makes you wonder what other nations have. It also begs the question of what response, if any, there will be to this?


Anyone with a few billion dollars (or equivalent) can develop their own top-notch electronic device/weapon any time, anywhere.

The question is whether or not you can build a relevant number of the devices and field them with any effectiveness. The training required for wide-scale adoption of such devices is where the game-breaker is for most.

Hell - I could build you heavy-armor mounted railgun for a few million dollars (maybe less - would kind of depend upon some specifics that would come from the design process). For a relatively modest investment, any electrical engineer or technician should be able to do about the same - provided they are worth their salt. You could have T-72s or M-1A1s running around with some pretty crazy gear.

The problem, however, returns to fielding, maintenance, and training. Sometimes, it's better to have a thousand fully equipped soldiers than it is to have a dozen special ops in powered armor exoskeletons (IE: the halo series).

As for a strategic response; we would have given it, already. More than likely, the response is going to be figuring out how they were able to jam the GPS signals and produce measures to defend against similar attacks in the future.

I would have to hit up google for a while, but I recall an article I came across a few years ago discussing the design and importance of jam-resistant GPS as it pertained to defense. If you think about it - this is pretty important considering the extent to which we are using GPS guided munitions.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:42 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 


I'm surprised they were dumb enough to tip their hat as far as some capabilities. I'm sure South Korea and the US will be working on a counter measure before a real shooting war starts when it really matters.

I hear South Korea is pretty "High-Tech"



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:45 AM
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Originally posted by getreadyalready
reply to post by Frogs
 


Actually, I could be mistaken, but I think most of the high-tech missile guidance systems are developed in N. Korea. Their tech is top notch, but sanctions keep them from producing anything themselves.


Most?

For whom?

The US, Russia and Chinese have all developed their own going back decades. Don't you mean North Korea has developed their own?
edit on 9-9-2011 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


No, I was under the impression North Korea developed most of the NATO missile systems and others. I'll have to go research and see where I got that idea from?



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:48 AM
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Response? They have just as much right to defend their airspace as any other nation does.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by quackers
 


Doubt it was in North Korean Airspace, since the jamming affected South Korean civillian aircraft as well.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 08:54 AM
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GPS is VERY easy to jam with very low power.

You can even make one in your home easy.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:02 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


NK does have an export market for missiles and other weapons...


KOREA MINING DEVELOPMENT TRADING
CORPORATION (a.k.a. CHANGGWANG SINYONG
CORPORATION; a.k.a. EXTERNAL TECHNOLOGY GENERAL
CORPORATION; a.k.a. DPRKN MINING DEVELOPMENT TRADING
COOPERATION; a.k.a. “KOMID”). Central District, Pyongyang, DPRK.
Primary arms dealer and main exporter of goods and equipment related to 
ballistic missiles and conventional weapons


www.un.org...

And some related news about the Korea Mining and Development Trading Corporation:

www.nkeconwatch.com...



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by Anonymouth
 



GPS is VERY easy to jam with very low power.

You can even make one in your home easy.


Yes... and no.

The military uses systems that are designed to be virtually impossible to jam. Since we are using the # to drop bombs and guide missiles, that's a pretty important aspect.

What is unclear is, exactly, what system was being jammed. Not everything in the military is top-notch. We run into vacuum tubes of yester-year in the avionics department, from time to time. It's not uncommon for much of the fleet to be operating on 20+ year old hardware that is so antiquated as to not exist in the 'working' civilian world (IE - not part of your 'retro' collection).



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:08 AM
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These types of "stories" can also serve to be the catalyst for creating/awarding large military contracts as well. Something to keep in mind as the entire MIC (Military Industrial Complex) is founded on perceived threat and extravagant response.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:16 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by quackers
 


Doubt it was in North Korean Airspace, since the jamming affected South Korean civillian aircraft as well.


Or it was within their airspace and they acted accordingly. Easily done if it happened near the border. Who's word do we have that it affected commercial aircraft, and even if it did so what? Propaganda is rife from both sides and the truth tends to lie somewhere in the middle.
edit on 9-9-2011 by quackers because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:18 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Yes

I'm well aware of their trade in weapons technology. But I thought the notion that North Korea had developed "most of the high-tech missile guidance systems" was a bit of a stretch. Especially when one considers both the Soviets and US space programs not to mention all the other previous military missile/rocket tests and launches carried out since the 50s well before North Korea had a chance to develop any programs while rebuilding from the Korean War.

Don't get me wrong I believe North Korea has Tech.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:21 AM
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Any county has the right to defend their airspace,I say good thing!

If North Korea wanted a war they would have started it ages ago.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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Originally posted by quackers
Or it was within their airspace and they acted accordingly.


If it happened in North Korean Arispace they would have shot it down not just jammed it's equipment. That obviously didn't happen.


Easily done if it happened near the border.


Being "Near" the border is not a violation of North Korean Airspace.


Who's word do we have that it affected commercial aircraft, and even if it did so what?


Well then there goes your whole "They have a right to defend their airspace" argument. Because if true they aimed their jamming equipment across the border into South Korea effecting military as well as potentially threatening the lives on civilian aircraft so it's no longer a legitimate "defensive" act but rather a provocative "offensive" action.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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I was sad to find out it didn't crash and burn. If any military isn't in their own airspace I couldn't really care less if they go down. In fact, I prefer it.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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Why is this happening today?
U.S & Soviets occupied Korea and then U.S. developped the western leaning south korea and the soviets developped the communist state in north korea.
But the division was by the UN

Of course more of the fault can go to the Soviets, sure

But then today we give billions of dollars to Pakistan for the nuclear program and then Pakistan shares nuclear technology with North Korea.

Secondly it's illegal for the U.S. to give financial aid to any country with nuclear weapons.
If the U.S. followed law perhaps North Korea would not have this nuclear intelligence that it does now.

everything is all messed up that's all i'm saying



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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Am I the only one who finds it strange that this happened in march and we're just now hearing about it? That alone raises the biggest flag for me.









 
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