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why the inside of the sun black?

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posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 04:46 AM
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I can't seem to get anyone to tell me something other than fusion..if you ask anyone how the sun works, they say en.wikipedia.org... Yes, wiki. Notice they only list the surface temperature. Trying to explain the Carona was too hard for them

Does that really explain why the inside is black? A gravity held constant nuclear fusion fireball shouldn't be dark inside right? I'm sure there's a link somewhere or credible scientist to explain it, I don't know. I personally want an answer to this, even if they think they can claim nano flares are anything but an electrical phenomenon. Just cause you cant see it, doesn't mean it's not there
www.abovetopsecret.com...

This one I found in search and would love to have a chat mnemeth1 about this. www.abovetopsecret.com...
am out of my depth in the mathematics, but the concept alone can explain so many anomalies

I want to know how the sun is dark on the inside. We cannot continue to lie to our youths about this, it's an injustice to them, and they need to know that we don't even fully understand how the sun really works, and that it is an open challenge to any that can help crack it.news.nationalgeographic.com...#/new-solar-observatory-telescope-wh ole-sun_25025_600x450.jpg

www.abovetopsecret.com... this post many links about the electrical universe theory,and even claims that the theory is dead. Cool, super hot Plasma jets we never noticed before is responsible for heating the corona. Hear that mnemeth1? They figured it out in February. As stated in that last thread, the sun is not simple. Yet electrical universe theorists have to explain where the power comes from or the theory is bogus?

They just found the invisible nano busts that we couldn't see before, along with the plasma jets we couldn't see before to heat the corona. before that, just because they didn't know what heated the corona, doesn't mean it isn't hotter than the surface, and especially the center, it was still heated.. That's fine, they can claim it's disproven

Personally, it makes too much sense to me. Why everything has an electromagnetic field, even dead planets. Everything does. They just found antimatter trapped in our EMF. Before they found that, do you think the claim that space is littered with antiprotons stand? No, nobody can see it, and it goes against conventional "wisdom"
Lo and behold we found anti protons trapped in our EMF. So just because they don't know what could "give the sun energy, this theory should be buried right? Those things still don't explain why the core is dark, or why it's colder than the surface. Just with gravity alone, this is impossible.. The more it would go in, the hotter it would get, being the helium fusing, right? Putting off light and heat like fusion does...

But it puts off magnetics too. Again, we only recently even realized that we can get magnetic energy from the sun, as if it's like the second half of that solar energy we have been trying to collect. (I saw a post here about it, in fact). Does fusion explain this? I was under the impression that magnetism in any case needs electricity. Again, I don't know the math, but I can tell you that it doesn't make sense to say its a fusion core sun. I will believe there is a secondary magnetic force accompanying gravity before I believe the rotating core causes our EMF. Light is multiparted, why can't gravity be?
Because we can't see gravity? does that mean the force isn't there? We may have already had proof for years......www.sciencedaily.com...

. We couldn't see these nano bursts until they came out with that camera, and if our core is like the conductor of this same magnetic energy, could we measure it?? Hell, a 12 year old pointed out a much better way to get solar energy, yet some scientists have devoted their lifes to trying to do the same, and thinking they know everything. i think ill take the "we dont know how the sun works, but we think we do" explanation... But what if thats wrong?there are just too many unanswered or half ass answers to shoot this theory down yet.

I am curious, if there was an electromagnetic "tether" when that energy transferred to the core, would it react like a kind of tesla coil, spreading the charge to the surface? Not only putting energy into the crude stuff we think comes from dinos, but could be the source of leylines, which some people swear by. Or if there is an alignment and the sun travels through multiple planets with an FTE, could this affect something? We all hear gravity won't, but we dont know if one of these little "portals" opening in an alignment and moving through multiple planets could, which may explain why some people are convinced alignments have an odd effect on earth...

Can we even prove gravity is not this force? That gravity, possibly a kind of electricity that we can't see, or the two forces in tandem to make gravity? Makes more sense than gravitons.

But seriously, I'll just play devils advocate, And
claim this theory is 100% bogus, I still wanna know why it's black and cold where it shouldn't be, that should be easily explainable with gravity and fusion, right?

If we can't get our sun right, we need to rethink things. If we do have it all right, cool. But that means a fusing core produces no heat or light, meaning it's heated from the outside.

Cool story, I apologize for length, so many questions



edit on 7-9-2011 by Venomilk because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-9-2011 by Venomilk because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:01 AM
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The inside of the Sun isn't black though, where did you get that info from?
It's white to the best of my knowledge.
edit on 7-9-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:02 AM
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reply to post by Venomilk
 


if it is black it could be something like density maybe?



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:02 AM
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reply to post by Venomilk
 


if it is black it could be something like density maybe?



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:03 AM
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reply to post by pazcat
 


Look at pics of sunspots in visible light, where the surface falls into the darkness. It's white in other types of cameras, yes



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:06 AM
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Suns spots are on the surface though, they are not windows to the inner workings of the sun.




Sunspots appear dark because they are much cooler than the rest of the surface of the sun. However, even though they appear dark, they are still very hot. Sunspots have temperatures around 6,300 Fahrenheit (~3,500 Celsius) while the surrounding surface of the sun has a temperature of about 10,000 Fahrenheit (5,500 Celsius). If a sunspot was alone in space, it would glow brightly.


coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu...




Sunspots are a magnetic phenomenon on the Sun. You can think of them as small pores on the surface of the Sun where lines of magnetic force enter and exit. Sunspots always come in pairs like the north and south poles on a bar magnet. The strength of the sunspot magnetic fields are usually 1000 times as strong as the average solar magnetic field. Because magnetic fields can produce pressure, inside sunspots, the gas does not need to exert quite as much pressure as elsewhere on the Sun to insure that the total pressure across a sunspot is in equilibrium with the gas surrounding the sunspot. Since the cooler a gas is, the less pressure it exerts, this means that the gas inside a sunspot can be cooler than the gas in the rest of the solar surface and still, with the help of the sunspots magnetic field, remain in equilibrium.


www.astronomycafe.net...



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:08 AM
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reply to post by Venomilk
 

A very confusing opening post. It is as if you are having a conversation with someone over the phone. Thus I am only hearing your half of the conversation. Where is the other half?


Originally posted by Venomilk

I want to know how the sun is dark on the inside.


How do you know that the sun is black inside? That's what I want to know.



 
I will go ahead and answer that question before you ask it: Nope. I didn't click any of the links. Wiki, meh. Other ATS threads? Well ya see, I am on this thread, not the others.


edit on 9/7/11 by BrokenCircles because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:19 AM
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Its not really black its to do with contrast.

The images we see of the sun are dimmer than what it actually is, think of how it looks in the sky and then of the images we see.

The dark bit in the images are 1000's of degrees in heat but they look "black" compared to the rest of the sun because of the contrast between the bright parts, but in real life they are actually not dark.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:36 AM
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what a crazy thread OP, lol!!!
"Black" sunspots was covred in high school science for me.
What I don't understand is why you would look into wkki for answers to an incorrect question instead of starting at the beginning? If you had googled "Why do sun spots look black?" you would have gotten the correct info immediately, and saved yourself a lot of hunting.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:48 AM
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Some say the Sun is actually COLD as the reaction is magnetic and not thermal (after all it is SPACE) etc etc

Most of the activity takes place at various layers, astronomers usually use WHITE light (Photosphere), Hydrogen-Alpha - RED (Promenances) and Calcium-K - BLUE (Surface sunspots and features) bands to monitor the Sun.

I actually plan to do Solar observation and imagery myself using white light (H-Alpha and Calcium-K tuning etalons are the price of a small car lol).

coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu...




edit on 7-9-2011 by Anonymouth because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 06:14 AM
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posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 06:20 AM
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Politically correct



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by chrissiel123
 


Shhh, this is how you discredit th EU theory



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by Venomilk
 


If you scrolled down the wikipedia page to the contents part and then click on part 1.1 - the core, it will tell you the temperature of the core:


The core of the Sun is considered to extend from the center to about 20–25% of the solar radius. It has a density of up to 150 g/cm3 (about 150 times the density of water) and a temperature of close to 13.6 million kelvin (K). By contrast, the Sun's surface temperature is approximately 5,800 K.


I have no idea about the rest of your post, however, it seems to be just inane ramblings
edit on 7/9/2011 by Griffo because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 07:55 AM
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reply to post by Venomilk
 


It's like the inside of my oven.

It's a very long time since anyone cleaned it.
edit on 7-9-2011 by Snippy23 because: mistook



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 07:59 AM
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Originally posted by Venomilk
reply to post by chrissiel123
 


Shhh, this is how you discredit th EU theory


No, it's how you answer your question "why the inside of the sun black?".

Answer: It's not.
See the posts and links above for the answer.

As for EU? That debunks itself, it doesn't need any help but just incase here is some light reading for anybody who wishes to peruse it.
www.tim-thompson.com...



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 08:01 AM
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Originally posted by Venomilk
I want to know how the sun is dark on the inside.




It isn't..



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 08:13 AM
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Doesn't light exist because it travels at a particular speed.... so if the photons/light particles are travelling slower then they are inclined to be a form of heat rather than light... and so less bright... or that could be me...lol.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by Venomilk
 


The inside of a star is not black.

Fusion is occuring in the core, releasing immense amounts of energy, heat, light and a kinetic outward expansion. Of course one can't actually see the core but we see it's energy throughout the star and deep into space.

When you see film of the Sun, the optics are calibrated to "see" the star in less intense brightness than it truely gives off (for obvious reasons). Through these calibrated optics, sun spots may look like black pits in the stars surface. These areas of the surface are actually still incredibly bright but sufficiently less so than the rest of the outer layer so as to appear dark when viewed through the special filters.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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First of all its not the fusion ball they think, we're in an electric universe and the those tests all add up, they're workable not flawed.

Second of all, the sun isn't what we think or even what the EU universe thinks fully. Its a mirror of the True Light from Beyond, Family streaming into the holographic school, we're like a shadow of paradise.

Its a doorway. ET phone home.


Thunderbolts the Electric Universe and Plasma Physics
edit on 7-9-2011 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



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