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Getting back to basics, survival 101, Part 1 of 10, Gear.

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posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 10:52 PM
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I agree with the idea of a good knife, everyone seems to be forgetting the fact you will need to sharpen it at some point, make sure you have the means to do so.

Fire starter, if you have the magnesium and flint, pack a bag of cotton balls fully coated in vaseline, the more vaseline the better, don't forget a small sheet of tinfoil(great for starting your cotton ball and magnesium on fire, along with shaping and moving the fire to where you want it, reusable too). You can pack all of this in a small bag that will not weigh very much but is worth several times it's weight in gold when you need a quick and easy fire after you have busted your tail hiking all day.

SN-great thread.




posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 01:21 AM
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reply to post by QuietSpeech
 


Cotton balls are a great idea, one I had overlooked in even my own supplies and one that I will be adding right away. Excellent, thanks!

Weather not withstanding, you will need tender kinder to start any fire with moist or wet logs, this is true even of punky wood, need to get a little bit of burn behind the sappy branches. Of course this depends on your location within the U.S. or otherwise but cotton balls, considering the weight vs reward argument should be a MUST. Adding mine tonight.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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b. 16x 20x Camo waterproof tarp. Tents are too heavy to carry and take far to long to set up and take down, this is not efficient in a SHTF situation, camping yes, massive riots, looting revolution.... No. Get yourself a good tarp, one that is sturdy and has clasp holes about every 24 inches, the more people in your home, the larger you should go. Weight is an issue so go minimal to at least keep out the elements and build up the rest with natural resources. A 16x 20x can shelter 5-6 people if erected properly.


I see your point here, but I'd have to disagree. My two-man dome tent is WAY lighter and a smaller pack than a 16x20 tarp, and is very easy to setup. It has only 6 quick insertable pegs, no rope, and two collapsable fiberglass poles. In addition, I've been in some pretty bad storms with it, and it has kept me safe and dry through all of them. With a tarp, you'd still get whipped with wind and rain...but in my tent, even if the rain is at a steep angle, driven by wind, I'm still pretty comfy. Also, I can hang a light from the top of it, keep my gear dry in it, etc. too.


Water purification resources. I keep one small pot, this can be used for duel purpose, it can be used for cooking and it can also be used for water purification. You can bring a water container but you must realize, water is heavy and as much as we consume is not practical to bring with you in a survival situation save small amounts, this will mean you will need to find a source and that source very well may not be suitable for drinking without decontamination. You will want to carry at least 24 water purification tablets found at any outdoor camping store and you MUST carry a small metal pot. Boiling water will kill nearly all harmful germs allowing for reasonably safe drinking.


Probably one of the most important considerations. Personally, I also like to carry collapsable water containers, even on a camping trip. Great way to bring water back to the camp, but not take up space while on the hoof.


I completely disagree. I think that is a common misconception among a lot of survivalists. Having some sort of rechargeable and portable computer device is crucial in my opinion. I like the PlayStation Portable with custom firmware installed, I can use it to read PDF files which is very important in my opinion. It's easier to have a bunch of books which hold large amounts of knowledge rather than having to contain it all in your head. Understanding basic circuits is an important skill too, for lighting, heating, recharging etc. Knowing how to use the electronic scraps available to you will prove useful very quickly


I'd think a Kindle would be best for carrying a lot of reading material, survival guides, etc. They basically use almost no power but the sun, and you can get a lot more use out of it's batteries. That said though, I'd still have at least one good book in paper format as it's more fool-proof.
edit on 9-9-2011 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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Interesting read. I will read your next one. I like that you mentioned jansport. My jansport pack lasted about 10 years of everyday use.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 02:25 AM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I agree with you about the pop tent. I also have one and use it for camping, they go up and come down in a hurry but I just don't tend to trust it when it comes to survival. They also average around 70-100 dollars, more money than the average person is willing to spend on a hypothetical situation.

That said, I speak from experience and I know exactly how to use the tarp along with natural materials in the environment to make it as if not more secure than a pop tent. The average probably does not, so I would say, if they can afford a 2 man throw tent, that may be the better option, depending on the climate and hostility of there location.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 02:25 AM
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Originally posted by gossipnancy
Interesting read. I will read your next one. I like that you mentioned jansport. My jansport pack lasted about 10 years of everyday use.


Excellent, thank you! It will be up tomorrow night.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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Great post, but a knife with a good carbon steel blade is the way to go. It's much easier to sharpen and a lot stronger. Carbon steel does require more care however to prevent corrosion, but in my opinion it's worth the extra effort.

Tarps are okay, but to lighten your load why not purchase a few rain ponchos with eyelets that can be fastened together to form a temporary shelter? Make all your gear multi-purpose.

For water purification, Polar Pure is a good option. It has an indefinite shelf life and can be used over and over to purify drinking water. If you have allergies to iodine you may want to consider other options since it's iodine based.



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 02:48 PM
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I agree with you about the pop tent. I also have one and use it for camping, they go up and come down in a hurry but I just don't tend to trust it when it comes to survival. They also average around 70-100 dollars, more money than the average person is willing to spend on a hypothetical situation.

That said, I speak from experience and I know exactly how to use the tarp along with natural materials in the environment to make it as if not more secure than a pop tent. The average probably does not, so I would say, if they can afford a 2 man throw tent, that may be the better option, depending on the climate and hostility of there location.


Great clarifications.

I've used my tent for camping before though too, so not just a SHTF purchase. It's tried and tested. I spent good money on it when I got it, and it's definitely been worth it. I've been through a couple of very rough storms with it (my friends' aluminum poled tent was ripped to pieces by the same storm...but my fiberglass spine could bend more)

True, if you really know how to do a lot with a tarp, I could see how it would go a long way, especially if more than two people. Just that you'd need to really find a good location to build that shelter, as you may not have enough tarp to cover all the possible directions weather could enter.

That's where the tent shines, as no matter which direction the wind and rain comes from, you're protected. The tarp is good though...there's a reason why Survivor contestants treasure it so much, hehe...



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 04:47 PM
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wonderful thread. i started my compilation, maybe 2 years ago, and most things you have stated i have. i carry a 7 inch full tang fire starter knife, much like the one on the following link
justlive.us...

i hadn't thought about the cotton balls soaked in vaseline, great idea. and i have a 6 month old daughter, so i have a sled as well for carrying her around after the honda accord breaks down, or we get to a place where the nissan frontier no longer climbs, which ever comes first... and plus if we get really hungry, my daughter would make a wonderful dinner! just kidding of course, i would kill anyone who harmed a hair on her head.

but what about a dog? you know, kind of like i am legend? i have a miniature shepherd, she is part german and part australian, with a fox for a great great grandpa or ma, and she is the most intelligent dog i have ever met.. yes, she is mine, but still she has watched me go in and out of a screen door, maybe a dozen times, i caught her with her paws on the handle trying to manipulate it, and if i hadn't called her, she would have been out...

anyways, i think a dog would be a wonderful bit of gear to bring along, they hear and smell better than any human, so assistance with survival is given there, plus they could help you sniff out a source of water possibly, food definitely, and the such.... just thinking... she is definitely in my basic survival kit.

i am legend, maybe not such a good example, you who have seen it know why... but that's a movie, and i'd trust my dog over most humans...
edit on 12-9-2011 by schitzoandro because: add info



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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reply to post by schitzoandro
 

A dog could be an asset or a liability depending upon how well he's trained. Dogs are great at alerting you when strangers are around, but they can also give away your position if they bark too frequently. My dog is a prime example of one that barks too much!







 
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