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Getting back to basics, survival 101, Part 1 of 10, Gear.

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posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 02:44 AM
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I am writing this thread for those that may be realizing that we are currently in a world crisis and the possibility of a real survival situation has become very real and with that said, very scary to the average person. If you are working a 9-5 selling cars, you may find yourself unprepared in case of a sudden instance of marshal law, dirty bomb, riot, world war 3 or a massive comet impact. This is some information straight from what exactly I would do and trust me when I say that I plan to survive.

This is a lengthy topic and I could go on for hours but as this is meant for the layman and novice I will start 101 with the first of the 10 things needed to survive.

10.) GEAR: You can not survive properly unless you prepare before hand. There are some basic things that every American should have at hand if needed, as for me this includes a mid price range hiking back pack, jet black that can hold about 60 pounds of gear. You will not want to skip quality here as a well made and weighted backpack will be essential to your survival. I wen't with a Jan Sport pro hiking model, it displaces weight around the shoulders and waist and is designed for efficiency and long distance travel with maximum weight.

This backpack should be fully stocked at all times and kept at the ready, I would advise that you have one for every adult in the house with smaller ones on scale for children. There are many things different people would tell you to put in the backpack and this is largely a matter of personal choice and common sense but I will share with you what I have in mine.

a. A hardened stainless steel survival knife with a sawback and hollow water proof handle. Sound pretty standard? Thats because it should, this is the backbone of survival, you will want a razor sharp stainless blade with a sawback, avoid the ones with a compass on the handle as they are usually cheep and poorly made, this will be the tool that you live and die by so don't go cheap, this knife will be used for everyday functions, cleaning pray and possibly even for emergency medical treatments and as such is your new best friend. I keep 24 water proof matches, a detailed map of the northeast forest preserves, 16 feet of heavy fishing line, 3 hooks, a sinker and an emergency blanket in my handle along with a picture of my daughter, what you keep in yours is up to you.

b. 16x 20x Camo waterproof tarp. Tents are too heavy to carry and take far to long to set up and take down, this is not efficient in a SHTF situation, camping yes, massive riots, looting revolution.... No. Get yourself a good tarp, one that is sturdy and has clasp holes about every 24 inches, the more people in your home, the larger you should go. Weight is an issue so go minimal to at least keep out the elements and build up the rest with natural resources. A 16x 20x can shelter 5-6 people if erected properly.

c. Fire resources, you can start a fire many ways, but if your in a jam and your family is cold, you don't want to try rubbing sticks together, your kids will think your retarded and your wife will be to cold to have sex and you will just have bloody hands for your effort. Keep 2-4 lighters, 6 boxes of water proof matches, (46 per box) and a magnesium stick in a water proof bag that can be bought at any outdoor supply store or on ebay. I wouldn't keep them all in one place, as I said before, my survival knife would always be on my belt with extras if I became separated from my backpack. A fire can mean the difference between life and death and often does, take this serious.

d. 500 foot roll of 550 para cord. The strongest cord you can buy and use for the money. 500 feet can be had for 12.00 dollars and can be used for too many things to list. The most important of those things would be.... Lashing for a raft which very well may be needed, support for sheltering. Cord to repel ridges or cliffs, safety lines for families in snow storms, floods or heavy mist. Snares for catching small game. Stitching lacerations.

e. Basic medical supplies. You will not be able to carry alot and what you do carry is only going to be the most basic treatment available. There is no way to prepare for medical trauma when you are gearing for basic survival other than to try and just stay alive and to that, I will offer what I have. 116 bad aids, seems trivial but a small cut in the wilderness can result in infection, fever and sometimes even death, the simple protection of a band aid can not be undersold. Triple antibiotic cream, vasoline, 2 razor blades, tweezers, gauze, ace bandage and a pair of latex gloves.

f. Water purification resources. I keep one small pot, this can be used for duel purpose, it can be used for cooking and it can also be used for water purification. You can bring a water container but you must realize, water is heavy and as much as we consume is not practical to bring with you in a survival situation save small amounts, this will mean you will need to find a source and that source very well may not be suitable for drinking without decontamination. You will want to carry at least 24 water purification tablets found at any outdoor camping store and you MUST carry a small metal pot. Boiling water will kill nearly all harmful germs allowing for reasonably safe drinking.

g. Protection from others. You will almost certainly face other people who have been caught unprepared and are desperate and desperate people are unpredictable and dangerous. I carry a fire arm. I understand not everyone does or is able too but if you can not or do not want to carry a fire arm you will rely on your survival knife, which should be kept on your belt at all times in full view. Outside of this, I also carry a full tang machete on the opposite side and a law enforcement grade mace capable of spraying 18 feet in single bursts, if done correctly and with confidence, this combination can defeat a fire arm. You will need to make up your mind as to what to carry for this situation.

h. Electronics. I would do away with all of them. Your cell phone even if it still works is only likely to give away your GPS postion and will do you more harm than good. Any radio transmission can potentially reveal your position. Do away with all of it and stick to the basics. You will want at least 2 clip fashion hat mounted LED head lamps, they are long lasting, powerful and allow you to keep your hands free. I also keep 6, middle finger length LED torch style flashlights and 3 12 hour glow sticks, fire works great but if your in a bind, you will need light and this can not be minimized, if your live in the south, you have to worry about where your sticking your hands to gather fire wood.

i. Standard basics you MUST HAVE. A leather man tool. Fishing tackle, small amount. A spork. A wire saw. A compass. A sleeping bag for every member of the family, infants may share the parents sleeping bag and it is probably preferred. binoculars. Trail mix. 4 space emergency blankets. 4 disposable rain ponchos.

j. Information of your surroundings. You should buy a basic survival guide that illustrates how to build basic shelters, how to fish in streams, rivers and lakes and how to set basic snares and animal traps. You should have some literature that shows basic edible plants in your area or the area you are traveling too, this can and most likely will mean life or death so don't take it lightly. Eat the wrong plant and die. Don't eat the right plant and starve. there may not be a second chance so be sure.
edit on 7-9-2011 by Helious because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 02:50 AM
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k. Comforts. Bring your favorite book, bring one for everyone in your family, small, paperback, bring something, sometimes even the calming experience of simply reading a familiar book can calm the soul. Bring pictures of your family, they are light weight and the return you can get in the moral boost from seeing them far outweighs the cost of carrying them. Bring a simple star chart, two fold, you can gaze and also navigate by the stars, teach your children while calming them down or impress your wife with your astronomical knowledge. Bring a harmonica even if you don't know how to play, making noise may not always be the best idea but if the opportunity presents itself, music will always lift your soul.

If you enjoyed this first segment, I will post survival 102 on Thursday this week. It will involve number 9. Food! thanks for reading and I hope it has been informative and a positive source of information for those who may need it or who are curious.
edit on 7-9-2011 by Helious because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 03:30 AM
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So bring a spork then. Got it.

But what if the earth is covered in 100 feet flames like in the movie "Knowing"?

Maybe better to find an old mine to crawl down into. That is what im going to do.
edit on 7-9-2011 by NeoVain because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 03:35 AM
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I have to go over your post again,but I'm glad you brought this subject up. I've been thinking of what I needed to include, in my emergency supplies, BOB,etc. So, any recommendations for a single mom helps. I'll stay tuned for Survival 102! Thanks again!



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 03:36 AM
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Originally posted by NeoVain
So bring a spork then. Got it.

But what if the earth is covered in 100 feet flames like in the movie "Knowing"?

Maybe better to find an old mine to crawl down into. That is what im going to do.
edit on 7-9-2011 by NeoVain because: (no reason given)


lol, if the Earth is covered in 100 feet of flames, I am afraid this information does not apply lol. And..... Never underestimate the power of a spork! Any sense of normal life can be a comfort that boosts moral, eating food that may not be appealing could be slightly masked with using a familiar utensil. I't might sound silly, but they are made from high grade plastics, very light weight so are very practical to bring. As in, the benefits of doing so out weigh the negatives.

edit on 7-9-2011 by Helious because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 03:41 AM
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Originally posted by alohagirl21
I have to go over your post again,but I'm glad you brought this subject up. I've been thinking of what I needed to include, in my emergency supplies, BOB,etc. So, any recommendations for a single mom helps. I'll stay tuned for Survival 102! Thanks again!


Excellent! Keep in mind I am not a survival expert but that being said, I have watched every episode of survivor man, man vs wild and duel survival, I have also used every vacation in the last 10 years to camp, hunt my own food and survive in the outdoors with the basics.

I also have a family to look after and take it very seriously, so my posts are by definition..... Serious, as I am explaining or trying to explain how I would plan on taking care of my own family in such situations.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 03:46 AM
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reply to post by Helious
 



a. A hardened stainless steel survival knife with a sawback and hollow water proof handle.


i disagree , your main knife needs to be full tang IMHO

there may bee a good hollow handle knife out there - and i am ready to be corrected

but i have never seen one that came close to being feildproof

your survival essentials go in a small steel tin - not your knife handle


f. Water purification resources.


boiling is slow , inneficient , requires a fire or expends fuel

a katadyn pocket is all i normally use - can fill a 1 litre bottle from almost any source faster than you can get a fire going

it also removes organic and inorganic debris

i add chemical sterilisers only in extreeme cases



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 03:54 AM
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Originally posted by ignorant_ape
reply to post by Helious
 



a. A hardened stainless steel survival knife with a sawback and hollow water proof handle.


i disagree , your main knife needs to be full tang IMHO

there may bee a good hollow handle knife out there - and i am ready to be corrected

but i have never seen one that came close to being feildproof

your survival essentials go in a small steel tin - not your knife handle


f. Water purification resources.


boiling is slow , inneficient , requires a fire or expends fuel

a katadyn pocket is all i normally use - can fill a 1 litre bottle from almost any source faster than you can get a fire going

it also removes organic and inorganic debris

i add chemical sterilisers only in extreeme cases


As I stated, I carry a full tang knife in the form of a field machete on my person. The hollow blade knife serves the sole purpose of carrying essential supplies should you become separated from your main pack. My knife is heavy duty, absolutely waterproof as far as the handle and the items in it and would never leave my side. That makes it the most essential part of survival as it becomes plan B that can save your life. Also, there is no great place to store a small steel tin that could not become separated from your person under duress.

As far as water goes, boiling is inefficient as it would seem but then you must realize that water purification tablets run out, natural filter bottles expend there life eventually. A metal pot, assuming you keep possession of it will boil water for you the rest of your life.
edit on 7-9-2011 by Helious because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 04:34 AM
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reply to post by Helious
 




Electronics. I would do away with all of them. Your cell phone even if it still works is only likely to give away your GPS postion and will do you more harm than good. Any radio transmission can potentially reveal your position. Do away with all of it and stick to the basics.
I completely disagree. I think that is a common misconception among a lot of survivalists. Having some sort of rechargeable and portable computer device is crucial in my opinion. I like the PlayStation Portable with custom firmware installed, I can use it to read PDF files which is very important in my opinion. It's easier to have a bunch of books which hold large amounts of knowledge rather than having to contain it all in your head. Understanding basic circuits is an important skill too, for lighting, heating, recharging etc. Knowing how to use the electronic scraps available to you will prove useful very quickly.
edit on 7-9-2011 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 04:47 AM
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reply to post by Helious
 


2 questions..

~what's the best way to store 3 days supply of water for 3 person household. I'm calculating 1gal/day (9gals)
~what's the best way to haul this vital essence?? (i.e. little plastic bottles, 1 gal jugs or larger??)

Assuming that we have a vehicle with full tank of gas (340miles worth) plus a Nissan pickup which will get us the same amount of miles as well ?



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:11 AM
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Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
reply to post by Helious
 




Electronics. I would do away with all of them. Your cell phone even if it still works is only likely to give away your GPS postion and will do you more harm than good. Any radio transmission can potentially reveal your position. Do away with all of it and stick to the basics.
I completely disagree. I think that is a common misconception among a lot of survivalists. Having some sort of rechargeable and portable computer device is crucial in my opinion. I like the PlayStation Portable with custom firmware installed, I can use it to read PDF files which is very important in my opinion. It's easier to have a bunch of books which hold large amounts of knowledge rather than having to contain it all in your head. Understanding basic circuits is an important skill too, for lighting, heating, recharging etc. Knowing how to use the electronic scraps available to you will prove useful very quickly.
edit on 7-9-2011 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)


Thats fantastic but how exactly do you plan on charging those goodies?



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:15 AM
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Originally posted by Komodo
reply to post by Helious
 


2 questions..

~what's the best way to store 3 days supply of water for 3 person household. I'm calculating 1gal/day (9gals)
~what's the best way to haul this vital essence?? (i.e. little plastic bottles, 1 gal jugs or larger??)

Assuming that we have a vehicle with full tank of gas (340miles worth) plus a Nissan pickup which will get us the same amount of miles as well ?





The more simple solution when it comes to survival is usually the best. If storage and carry is not a concern and you are traveling in a vehicle, use 1 gallon milk containers, Tupperware or whatever you have available. I keep two 1 liter insulated water containers but these are not exactly practicable to carry long distances if you must travel on foot.

If you are afforded the luxury of a vehicle, carry as much as you can as far as you can in what you can until it is necessary to travel by other means, at that point, carry as little as you feel needed until you reach the source of another water supply, keep in mind, you can go days without food, the same is not true for water.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:17 AM
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Originally posted by ignorant_ape
reply to post by Helious
 



a. A hardened stainless steel survival knife with a sawback and hollow water proof handle.


i disagree , your main knife needs to be full tang IMHO


I agree a survival knife should not be a stainless hollow handle. Stainless steel is harder to sharpen and the hollow staick tang is subject to issues.

The Becker knives are stout and solid full tang beasts.

www.thesurvivalistblog.net...

edit on 7-9-2011 by sparrowstail because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:22 AM
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reply to post by Helious
 


not that i think electronics will have any real long term use........solar power ..i have a couple of small portable solar chargers for this purpose....



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:29 AM
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Originally posted by hopenotfeariswhatweneed
reply to post by Helious
 


not that i think electronics will have any real long term use........solar power ..i have a couple of small portable solar chargers for this purpose....


Solar power electronics are an option, that being said, they are not largely available to the majority of people who take survival training seriously much less the common man, that is why I did not include such devices in the thread. I appreciate the post though as they do deserve a mention and hopefully before long before it all comes down, these devices will be more accessible.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:35 AM
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Bookmarked.

Thanks for sharing how you would go about surviving in an extreme situation. Its good to get a personal view as opposed to a general-'this is what you should do' etc.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:39 AM
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reply to post by Helious
 


in my situation i have 3 dependants and the youngest is 18 months,so if TSHF as such were in trouble,dont get me wrong im semi prepared,i have more water ,food and other supplies than most,a great truck,like minded freinds and even somewhere to get to....the trouble is getting there,walking with packs is not an option...

peace



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:44 AM
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reply to post by Helious
 




Thats fantastic but how exactly do you plan on charging those goodies?
With a little bit of innovation. If you could get hold of a small solar panel you would be in luck. You could also use a generator. Chemical solutions that create electricity could potentially be used. Have you ever seen those torches which you can recharge by winding a handle? If you wanna get really smart you could create a simple version of the electrical generator contained in the torch. I assume it works off some basic induction principles.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 06:25 AM
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Good informative post!

Unlike others, I don't see anything wrong with what you presented here.
It gives a great basic outline to start with, if a person has no knowledge.
Great way to get a head start on a good rucksack.


But I will add this:
In any situation, the key element is knowledge!
The ability to adapt to any situation depends on the persons knowledge...
How to build a fire without matches.
How to build shelter without rope or tarp.
How to provide food and water without carrying it with you.
If my life depended on it, I would be more concerned with learning these skills, than anything else.
But that's my opinion, and most people are going to rely on others to help.
Whereas I believe you should only rely squarely on yourself.
I would definitely focus on practicing these main skills, even for fun.
Especially if I didn't know how to do any of these things...

And don't anyone tell me, "Well Havok, I don't know how to make shelter, or fire!"...
We all have had plenty of time focus of learning things we don't know.
It's up to the individual to decide what's more important in life...

So, In my humble opinion...
All these things could be provided with just what nature gives you, if you have the know-how.
But if people had to migrate into the woods, carrying around large 60lb. rucksacks is inefficient.
And I'd be willing to bet most people couldn't handle a 5 mile hump with one. Let alone 20.

Just to be as simple as possible, the best thing you can carry is a good survival knife.
With that alone, you can build shelter, hunt for food, and defend yourself.
It's not bulky or cumbersome and it will last longer than any supplies...
Remember one thing, all the things you bring will eventually run out.
But you will never run out of knowledge or skills, they will only get better with time!
So what is more important?
I think skill is much more important.
And once you learn, you never forget...


So get out there and practice!






posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by hopenotfeariswhatweneed
reply to post by Helious
 


in my situation i have 3 dependants and the youngest is 18 months,so if TSHF as such were in trouble,dont get me wrong im semi prepared,i have more water ,food and other supplies than most,a great truck,like minded freinds and even somewhere to get to....the trouble is getting there,walking with packs is not an option...

peace


Have you thought of a sled? I know it sounds silly, but if you have to walk, those plastic sleds that scoop up around the sides may help greatly. Consider coating the bottom with wax or some other lubricant to use in seasons other than winter.

I agree with havok, knowledge is the most impotant thing. Have a bob, but know and teach your family (yes, kids too) how to use every item in that pack!

You can fasten your knife to a stick for spear fishing or self defense, you can use dental floss + a stick + a safety pin or paperclip for fishing too.

Know how to use your gear... and get creative with it! Get out and go "survival camping" .. using ONLY the items in your pack... practice!

The SAS survival guide is not only an awesome resource, it is tiny and can be picked up just about anywhere, including ebay... also a first aid book won't take a lot of room and could save a life.

Do not underestimate the power of honey. It can cure almost anything from burns to infected wounds, educate yourself on the healing power of honey and pack some in your bag.. at the very least it is a good short term kick for your body if you have no food at hand.

~edit~ almost forgot: a bandana for filtering the debris out of your water and hand crank radio. You can even get the hand crank radio with some nice built-in features like flashlight and USB charger.

edit on 7-9-2011 by Invariance because: forgot to mention (see edit note in post)



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