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Scientific Research on Solar System Brown Dwarf and Planet X.

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posted on Nov, 23 2015 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse
a reply to: JadeStar


How do you explain that extreme trans-Neptunian objects (ETNOs) are so closely bunch together having an argument of perihelion close to 0 degrees?

Some large object/s has/have to keep them there. They can't just stay in that orbit by magic.


Astronomers speculate that our system had another gas giant that got ejected out of it through gravitational interaction with Jupiter. That gas giant could have influenced those ETNOs' orbits. www.sciencealert.com...




posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 03:38 AM
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a reply to: Mogget


He still doesn't get it. Not sure he ever will. Objects that large (ETNOS) don't cluster together in the same area unless there is something with greater mass keeping them there. It's that simple. It isn't magic.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 03:42 AM
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a reply to: wildespace


Except that according to that article this occurred 4 billion years ago, yet the ETNOS are keeping their orbits for billions of years without the help of a larger object keeping them in that orbit?... It makes no sense.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 04:21 AM
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If there was a fifth giant planet in the early history of the Solar System, then it would have had to have been in an orbit way beyond Neptune to have affected the orbits of the ETNOs. If it was, then it could not possibly have been ejected from the Solar System after a close encounter with Jupiter. So, it must have been located close to Jupiter's orbit to have been ejected, and this would mean that it passed through the ETNO realm only once as it left the Solar System forever. The chances of it perturbing multiple ETNOs in a single pass so that their arguments of perihelion became closely aligned are less than negligible.

Of course, more objects need to be discovered in this region before any firm conclusions can be reached, but it seems that the close passage of a star, or an as yet undiscovered planet are the most likely candidates.
edit on 24-11-2015 by Mogget because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 09:21 PM
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There is some new information about these very possible objects existing within our solar system.

The following information was first posted by ATS member UnknownEntity in this thread.


Astronomy
&
Astrophysics
manuscript no. aCenD_ALMA_Letter
c
ESO 2015
December 10, 2015
L
etter to the
E
ditor
A new submm source within a few arcseconds of
Centauri
ALMA discovers the most distant object of the solar system
R. Liseau
1
, W. Vlemmings
1
, E. O’Gorman
1
, E. Bertone
2
, M. Chavez
2
, and V. De la Luz
3
1
Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala,
Sweden, e-mail:
rene.liseau@chalmers.se
2
Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro 1, Sta. María Tonantzintla, Puebla, Mexico,
3
CONACYT Research Fellow, SCiESMEX, Instituto de Geofisica, Unidad Michoacan, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico,
Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico. CP 58190
Received ; accepted
ABSTRACT

Context.
The understanding of the formation of stellar and planetary systems requires the understanding of the structure and dynamics of their outmost regions, where large bodies are not expected to form.

Aims.
Serendipitous searches for Sedna-like objects allows the observation of regions that are normally not surveyed.

Methods.
The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is particularly sensitive to point sources and it presents currently the only means to detect Sedna-like objects far beyond their perihelia.

Results.
ALMA observations 10 months apart revealed a new blackbody point source that is apparently comoving with (Alpha)Cen AB.

Conclusions.

We exclude that source to be a sub-/stellar member of the (alpha) Cen system, but argue that it is either an extreme TNO, a Super-Earth or a very cool brown dwarf in the outer realm of the solar system.
...

arxiv.org...



The serendipitous discovery of a possible new solar system object with ALMA

W. H. T. Vlemmings 1 ,⋆, S. Ramstedt 2, M. Maercker 1, B. Davidsson 2

1 Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, 439 92 Onsala, Sweden
2Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20, Uppsala, Sweden

December 10, 2015

ABSTRACT

Context.
The unprecedented sensitivity of the Atacama Large millimeter/submillimeter array (ALMA) is providing many new dis-coveries. Several of these are serendipitous to the original goal of the observations.

Aims.
We report the discovery of previously unknown continuum sources, or a single fast moving new source, in our ALMA obser-vations. Here we aim to determine the nature of the detections.
Methods.
The detections, at > 5.8 σ in the image plane and > 14 σ in the (u, v) − plane, were made in two epochs of ALMA observations of a 25′′ region around the asymptotic giant branch star W Aql in the continuum around 345 GHz. At a third epoch, covering 50′′ ×50′′ ,the source(s) were not seen.

Results.
We have investigated if the detections could be spurious, if they could constitute a population of variable background sources, or if the observations revealed a fast moving single object.
Based on our analysis, we conclude that a single object (with a flux of ∼ 3.0 mJy) exhibiting a large proper motion (∼ 87′′ yr−1) is the most likely explanation. Until the nature of the source becomes clear, we have named it Gna.

Conclusions.
Unless there are yet unknown, but significant, issues with ALMA observations, we have detected a previously unknown objects in our solar system. Based on proper motion analysis we find that, if it is gravitationally bound, Gna is currently located at 12−25 AU distance and has a size of ∼220−880 km. Alternatively it is a much larger, planet-sized, object, gravitationally unbound, and located within∼4000 AU, or beyond (out to∼0.3 pc) if it is strongly variable. Our observations highlight the power of ALMA in detecting possible solar system objects, but also show how multiple epoch observations are crucial to identify what are otherwise probably assumed to be extra-galactic sources

arxiv.org...



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 03:43 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

The crucial phrase being "if it is gravitationally bound."



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 10:03 PM
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originally posted by: DJW001

The crucial phrase being "if it is gravitationally bound."


So what is keeping ETNOS so far out in their orbits and so close together with an argument of perihelion close to 0? Magic?

The Sun is not causing ETNOS to keep that orbit so far out and so close to each other, and neither are the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, nor Neptune, and much less Pluto affecting ETNOS so far out... So what is keeping them there?


edit on 11-12-2015 by ElectricUniverse because: add and correct comment.



posted on Dec, 11 2015 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

Is there a need for something to keep them in such orbits, like the orbits would gradually change without that influence? Or could have something (like a passing star) set those bodies in their current orbits, and then left?



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 12:35 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace

Is there a need for something to keep them in such orbits, like the orbits would gradually change without that influence? Or could have something (like a passing star) set those bodies in their current orbits, and then left?


To have that stable orbit in which all ETNOS we have seen so far stay in, and they cluster together on the far side of the solar system, there has to be something with a large mass out there keeping them in that orbit.

The claim that a passing star nudged these ETNOS to their current orbit cannot explain why they have stayed in that stable orbit for over 4 billion years. Something with a large mass is out there. All observation seems to show at least 2 very large objects are there. Just another major planet cannot explain it either. There has to be a failed star/brown dwarf/sub-brown dwarf in the outer edge of the solar system, within the Oort cloud, keeping all these objects, and at least another large planet, in the outer solar system.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

just watched a movie called EARTHFALL its about a planet that just flys past the earth but in its tail they are loads of large rocks that hit the earth and also as it fly past the earth it pulls the earth out of its orbit and flips it too so one side is always facing the sun and the other in night . So to me this film is something like you are all talking about .







 
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