What Is Babesiosis, and Will It Kill Us All?

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posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 07:54 AM
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What Is Babesiosis, and Will It Kill Us All?


gawker.com

A tick-borne parasite that causes a potentially deadly infection is hiding in America's blood supply. No FDA-approved diagnostic test can detect its presence. Should we panic?

Well, to adopt the appropriate emotional response, let's first examine some facts about this parasite, named Babesia microti, and Babesosis, its signature sickness. As Reuters reports, Babesiosis infections often lead to "anemia, fever, chills and fatigue," but sometimes causes people's organs to fail, and/or kills them.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 07:54 AM
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So the thing I found most disturbing about this article is that as of yet there are no tests to determine if you even HAVE the parasite. It seems that as it is a 'regional' issue companies have not yet come out with a test. Granted the study is very new but I wonder how long we will have to wait for a proper screening method.

It certainly hasn't killed many people, but 77% have died between 2000-2009 and the numbers seem to be going up. It also sees to be spreading from the 7 states where it was initially found.

I'll try to scrape up some more info on this and I know the title is alarmist.

gawker.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 07:57 AM
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Never heard of this
Is it similar to Morgellons?

Sounds to me like next-generation illnesses are becoming more and more symbiote-like.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 07:58 AM
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Transfusion-Associated Babesiosis in the United States: A Description of Cases

Tick-borne parasite infecting blood supply: CDC


Of the 162 cases of Babesia infection caused by blood transfusions between 1979 and 2009, nearly 80 percent occurred between 2000 and 2009. "Babesia microti has become the most frequently reported transfusion-transmitted parasite in the United States," CDC researchers wrote, far outpacing malaria infections, which accounted for 49 cases of transfusion-associated disease during the same period, including just five cases during 2000-2009. Premature infants appear to be especially vulnerable.
edit on 6-9-2011 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:00 AM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


I don't think it is similar to Morgellan's. I was under the impression that they didn't even know what caused Morgellans at this point.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:12 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


As a medical student, babesiosis is a circulatory infection that has malaria like symptoms, it is treatable with clindamycin and azithromycin. You can detect it using a Giemsa stain which is also used to diagnose malaria and other conditions. Do not worry my friend.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:13 AM
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im really not worried about 162 cases since 1970. sure its seems the rates are increasing but so is the population and the increasing number of people going further and further into what was once woods. just my opinion nothing to worry about.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by Unvarnished
 



There are currently no diagnostic tests approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that can detect the infection before people donate blood.


Are you sure? Every site I've read seems to indicate that is incorrect but then again we all know the news can be wrong.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:15 AM
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reply to post by Unvarnished
 


What if someone is allergic to clindamycin (which I am) ?

No reason to panic but just wondering.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:15 AM
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Originally posted by Domo1
reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


I don't think it is similar to Morgellan's. I was under the impression that they didn't even know what caused Morgellans at this point.


They haven't even confirmed that Morgellans even exists... I mean, I think there is something to it, but last I heard the medical community has not admitted or at least, confirmed it was real.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by Unvarnished
 



A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose babesiosis. Babesiosis develops only in patients who live in or travel to an endemic area or receive a contaminated blood transfusion within the preceding 9 weeks, so this aspect of the medical history is vital.[14] Babesiosis may be suspected when a person with such an exposure history develops persistent fevers and hemolytic anemia. The definitive diagnostic test for babesiosis is the identification of parasites on a Giemsa-stained thin blood smear.[14] So-called "Maltese cross formations" on the blood film are essentially diagnostic of babesiosis, since they are not seen in malaria, the primary differential diagnosis.[13] Careful examination of multiple blood smears may be necessary, since Babesia may infect less than 1% of circulating red blood cells and thus be easily overlooked.[15]


Are thy able to test a blood donors blood before they give a transfusion? It seems like they can't yet or they would be doing it, at least for compromised patients.

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edit on 6-9-2011 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


Question (most likely a stupid one so bear with me).

If there are no tests that can detect this, then how do we know it exists?



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by Xcathdra
 


There are tests that can detect it. Read the post above yours. I just don't think they are testing blood or donors for it at the moment.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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I am not worried. How many other parasites go undetected? How long has this one been around? since the beggining of time?





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