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Japan to close ALL their nuclear power plants

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posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:38 AM
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Japan nuclear power plants to close

Japan's trade minister has said all of the country's nuclear reactors will be shut down, following the recent nuclear crisis at Fukushima.

Yoshio Hachiro, Japan's new trade and energy minister, said the country would have "zero" nuclear reactors in the future.

This is basically the new policy of the government. But is this really realistic? I mean people don't like nuclear power... but in people's mind, nuclear catastrophes are ``maybe in the future`` and economic hardship due to the loss of those nuclear reactors will be ``now``. So will the voters opt for the ``easy`` solution and continue with nuclear power anyway? Because really there's not much alternative....not at the same price anyway, not to mention the transition time it will take.

But does all that even matter? Japanese governments stay in office for such short time, these could get the boot way before this plan is enacted...

Japan's economy has been in recession for the last 20 years or so, and they are the most indebted country in the western world... 200%+ of GDP in debt... and their population is getting very old... so this will certainly not help that. But safety should be the main priority... before economy.

Japan is about to live some real tough times. Hopefully nobody takes advantage of the situation (like China)... The Japanese people is a strong people and a very smart people they will be able to whether whatever is coming their way.


This is a good thing they are doing... so that Japan doesn't turn like that :

edit on 6-9-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:46 AM
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wow. im glad they are closing down their reactors, I read somewhere that germany is going to do the same. Maybe it is about time we put some real investment in renewables...



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:49 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 

You and I read that story completely differently, and I think you're reading things into it that aren't stated.

There's nothing in the story saying they will be shut down soon, so your comments about immediate impact of shutting down nuclear power seem to be misplaced to me.

My take is, they will not build additional reactors, and through the process of attrition, eventually all the old nuclear reactors will go offline if there are no new ones to replace them, because they have a limited lifespan. The article doesn't specifically state that either (well it does say no new plants), but I think it's a more likely interpretation.

How rapid the attrition process will be is unclear as there is no timetable stated, such as the one Germany has provided for their nuclear power shutdown.

I'm still curious to see if they will eventually restart Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors 5 and 6. I think it would be irresponsible to do so if they are located in a contamination zone, but I imagine TEPCO would like to do so, since they were relatively undamaged in the disaster, with the exception of support facilities that could be rebuilt if they can figure out a way to clean up the contamination.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:51 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 



I'm still curious to see if they will eventually restart Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors 5 and 6.

You must be kidding.
But you know, TEPCO are insane enough to do so.

And yeah, I think you are right, politicians will choose the ``easy`` way and not build new power plants but not close the existing ones.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:52 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


about time!
lets hope the world follows.

we underestimate its power and arent evolved enough to truely use it. but why would you want to when we have safer renewable energy anyway?

if you cant deal with somethings waste you shouldnt be feeding it hot curry.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:54 AM
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I just watched the video too, that was very sad...



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:58 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


That my friend is nothing short of an exceptional video.

Japans officials need to accept that things are dire and need critical decisions to be made-quickly.

Every second they try sweeping the nuclear issues under the carpet, ignoring and procrastinating, that video becomes more real and more severe.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 05:37 AM
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Noda Tells Wary Japanese Nuclear Power Is Needed to Save Economy



Japan’s new Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda in his first days in office started to deliver a difficult message to a public still in shock from the Fukushima nuclear disaster:

Atomic power is needed to save the economy

. Nuclear power provided about 30 percent of the electricity in the world’s third biggest economy before the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. Now, about 80 percent of Japan’s 54 reactors are offline with more shutting for scheduled maintenance in the months ahead.

With the majority of opinion polls showing the public oppose the use of atomic power, Noda needs to convince his electorate so-called stress tests on reactors will make them safer to restart. Industry leaders have said they may shift production overseas if power supplies aren’t stable, threatening an economic recovery. “There will be very little reserve electricity for peak hours in the winter and summer if the operating rate of reactors keeps falling,” said Yugo Nakamura, an analyst for Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Noda is “trying to avoid economic disruptions by restarting reactors after safety checks.”

Source:



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 05:41 AM
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reply to post by Human0815
 


So there's conflicting messages here... What's the real stance of the new Japanese government...

Probably pro-nuclear power...



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 06:01 AM
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Extra news, finally ..



Peace ..


edit on 6-9-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 06:07 AM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo
reply to post by Human0815
 


So there's conflicting messages here... What's the real stance of the new Japanese government...

Probably pro-nuclear power...


Hmmm, a good question


I think (!!!) the New Ones, who are in fact the Old Ones will follow
what the big Companies are telling them,
this means new Reactors!
(but maybe not on the Homeland?)

There is a change going on here in Nippon,
slow and quite but it is moving,
to build a new Plant will be afaik impossible at the moment,
we can say the same for the Re-Start of the closed Plants
who need an approval from the Village Headmen!



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 06:25 AM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


I read somewhere (can't find the link right now cause I'm at work and have limited amount of time, but I will post it here later if you wish) that TEPCO is closing. And by closing I mean that the company will cease to exist. So I'd say this is very good news!

And as far as the other piece of good news, I'd say FINALLY!!!
Nuclear power isn't safe, we've had two major accidents in a period of 25 years, and countless small or covered up as well to prove it.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 06:48 AM
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Originally posted by Vitchilo
So there's conflicting messages here... What's the real stance of the new Japanese government...

Probably pro-nuclear power...


I caught an interview with Genba (new foreign minister) on TV a couple of hours ago. He was talking about the need for the government to increase backing for development of clean energy tech, with the goal of said tech becoming a major export.

I don't think there's a contradiction here. The way I read the situation: We need nuclear power today, that's just a fact. We're going to continue to need nuclear power until we have something in place to replace it with.

So: maintain the status quo as far as generation goes, and start seriously funding clean energy research across the board. Make it a national priority. Genba referred to the bullet train projects a few times when I saw him, seems to me he wants to make clean energy tech development a source of national pride on the same level.

It could work, frankly.

There are a couple of very large solar initiatives in the works - one by the head of Softbank, and I think the other is by Panasonic. The softbank one is going online relatively soon, the first 10 plants will be 20Mw each. 200Mw is a bit more than a drop in the bucket - it's a very good start.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 11:56 AM
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reply to post by vox2442
 


Here ya go-try this to replace it with:


Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclear

A surprising aerodynamic innovation in wind turbine design called the 'wind lens' could triple the output of a typical wind turbine, making it less costly than nuclear power.


www.mnn.com...

Shame the Japanese have essentially locked the stable after the horse has bolted though.
Damn shame.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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wind remains intermittent, no matter how often you compare prices and storage systems have languished in the prototype stage with the exception of pumped hydro, which requires appropriate locations to flood - not to mention the additional cost.

'renewable' electricity as it is today means the end of reliable supply. nuclear will be replaced by fossil fuel to the tune of half a billion per year and GW, price hikes notwithstanding. Anything else is a dream, which is being proven as we write.


i find it disconcerting that the most powerful technology available to humankind is regarded as a genuine mistake which people seek to reverse rather than demand appropriate and responsible use and development. With monotonous regularity,you find either die hard anti-nukes or staunch supporters (well, only a couple) and the opinions of both are non-negotiable, so all discussion is doomed to remain futile. The resulting climate of loathing an distrust means that little if any constructive criticism is voiced while nuclear engineering is left to boneheaded supporters only.

so, on one hand this leads to a public supported thrust towards outlawing all things nuclear (including medicine, diagnostics, etc) on the other there is stagnation within the nuclear industry and regulating bodies, which is dangerous as old reactors are neither updated nor replaced. this danger only recently materialized....

needless to say, both factions need each other.


PS: nuclear energy density means that the entire world would have proven fuel reserves for millenia if breeding reactors were commonplace, something no other known technology can offer. energy isn't about convenience, so ignoring or even banning usable options while hoping that aneutronic fusion will work, someday, is borderline suicidal.

what if a dam failed tomorrow, drowning, say, roughly a million people? would you want to see every single reservoir drained, regardless of flow rate, height and proximity to population centers? this is exactly the reaction being displayed here, the only difference of course being the number of fatalities.
edit on 2011.9.6 by Long Lance because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by Long Lance
 


Ok if not wind,then wave power?
That's a good one to look at I think.


Originally posted by Long Lance
what if a dam failed tomorrow, drowning, say, roughly a million people? would you want to see every single reservoir drained, regardless of flow rate, height and proximity to population centers? this is exactly the reaction being displayed here, the only difference of course being the number of fatalities


A dam break is different to a nuclear meltdown.
It does not leave a radioactive legacy.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by Silcone Synapse

A dam break is different to a nuclear meltdown.
It does not leave a radioactive legacy.



so the real issue for you is that it could harm people in the future, not so much the amount of inflicted damage? granted, besides Banquiao this scenario fortunately hasn't yet unfolded but i genuinely wonder if the reaction would be different after the fact.

of course, the long term damage would depend on what's inundated downstream, but i have to wonder for how long f-ex. that particular patch of land in Hungary contaminated by aluminium byproducts (link) will remain unsafe for agriculture. Would you agree that the effects of toxic soil contamination can be comparable to nuclear fallout, depending on relative amounts?



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 07:00 PM
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If Japan could find a way to harness earthquake power... and store it... they would be golden.


Anyway I think you all right. The new government will focus on clean energy while not building new nuclear power plants.

I really hope it works... it would save the Japanese economy if they do a breakthrough in technology.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 11:18 PM
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The People here in Japan become the Master of Energy-Saving!
At the moment we save more than 35% in our daily use,
and until now we has had no Blackout!

When we do the Energy-Saving more efficient we can turn off
all Nuclear Plants and some of the Coal Plants too
without Problems!



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by Long Lance

snip


PS: nuclear energy density means that the entire world would have proven fuel reserves for millenia if breeding reactors were commonplace, something no other known technology can offer.

snip



By breeder reactors, do you mean like the Monju Reactor?

Because, you know, they don't have accidents either.

Oh, they do?

Sorry. Still not a good idea.

An industry that has waste products which are dangerous for longer then human history does not seem like the best way to go to me, but what do I know. Apparently not very much.



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