Most challenging food...?

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posted on Sep, 13 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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Originally posted by FEDec

You mean making it from scratch? If so, only dried pasta gets chewy. Fresh pasta ALWAYS has a different texture. Have you tried messing with the gluten content? Perhaps try pastry or bread flour-- a lot of Italians use OO flour and/or Semolina (durum wheat) flour. OO is very soft, semolina is a little more "hard".


What are you talking about? I have personally tasted fresh pasta which is quite chewy. It involves manipulating the dough in a certain way which makes the pasta quite dense. I know of the technique I just don't know the technique.


It's called "kneading" and it takes time to get the hang of it. They have mixers for it but I have been making bread since I was a kid so over 20 yrs lol and I dont like them. I prefer my hands. Using your hands take time and you should knead for no less than 5mins.


I made this thread on how to make bow tie pasta from scratch.How to Make Bow Tie Pasta There is a video on how to knead it, you would also use this technique for bread dough. Let me tell you it will give you a work out and even throw your back out (yes that really happened) but it is worth it in the end! Yummy pasta and some nice arms


It takes time to get it right and it can be frustrating. If it gets stuck add a little flour, I usually just sprinkle some on as I need it. Also if you added too much flour just add 1/4 tsp water or just wet your hands and work with it. I usually just wet my hands.

Also once you make it you will want to lightly brush w/ olive oil and then wrap it in saran wrap and let it sit for at least 30mins. It will be easier to work with once it has set a little while. Also semolina flour is best for pasta.

I make pasta weekly as well as some kind of bread. I like to add herbs to my pasta dough to give it flavor. My lasagna noodles are loved by many


Happy kneading




posted on Sep, 14 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


It was fun. My favorite dish was actually the first one. I got to buy new gadets (cornet molds) and did salmon mousse and tuna tartar stuffed cornets paired with Veuve Clicquot Brut. The best part was I got to eat some of the 'rejects' the night before and the extras the day of the dinner.

How did your frenchb weekend go? Did you end up cooking what you mentioned?







edit on 14-9-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: Networkdude has no beer.



posted on Sep, 14 2011 @ 12:42 PM
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Originally posted by FEDec
I can never seem to get the technique right when making my own pasta. It never seems chewy enough for my tastes. Bechamel seems to trip me up sometimes too but I'm getting the hang of it.


What type of pasta are you making? How long are you kneading the dough? What are you using to knead the dough (machine or hand)? How are you rolling it out (machine/hand)? What is the recipe that you are using?

There are a few things that could cause this but without further info it is hard to diagnose via the forum.

Edit to add: I just saw that the shoe fanatic gave you some pretty good advice as well.



edit on 14-9-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: Networkdude has no beer.



posted on Sep, 14 2011 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by FEDec

You mean making it from scratch? If so, only dried pasta gets chewy. Fresh pasta ALWAYS has a different texture. Have you tried messing with the gluten content? Perhaps try pastry or bread flour-- a lot of Italians use OO flour and/or Semolina (durum wheat) flour. OO is very soft, semolina is a little more "hard".


What are you talking about? I have personally tasted fresh pasta which is quite chewy. It involves manipulating the dough in a certain way which makes the pasta quite dense. I know of the technique I just don't know the technique.

Noodle boiling instructions?
Seriously? I'm no Ferran Adria but it's obvious from the few sentences I posted that I am a little past that. Maybe you didn't mean to but you've come off as terribly condescending.


Maybe you should relax
I haven't said one condescending thing on this entire thread, why would I start with you? Maybe I misunderstood when you said "chewy"... sigh... I was just trying to make clear that fresh pasta has a different texture than store bought dried pasta. How was I to know that you already were aware of this?

Most people have no idea how to cook... A friend of mine would dump pasta into cold water and turn it on medium expecting a result...

Have a great day, hopefully you saw my advice on flours....... Peace



posted on Sep, 14 2011 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 



I didnt get to do it. I got a job instead lol so French night has been put on hold but for good reason.


I have everything I need to make it, I just need the time now lol



posted on Sep, 14 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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Originally posted by mblahnikluver
I have everything I need to make it, I just need the time now lol


Keep us posted regardless, I'm sure it will be culinary nirvana. I'm thinking of doing Asian this weekend, I have a craving for spring rolls and hot and sour soup and I'm luck enought to have a really good Asian market one town over.



posted on Sep, 16 2011 @ 09:15 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


My mum kneads everyday to make chapatti's lol

I'll be doing that soon



posted on Sep, 16 2011 @ 10:09 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

My mom always made the best pies. Her pie crust was unequaled by any other I've ever had. She wasn't one of those people who had cooking 'secrets' and freely shared recipes with anyone who asked for one. She gave away that pie crust recipe I don't know how many times and no one ever seemed to be able to replicate it exactly.

I remember when I was a kid and a neighbor came over to make pie crust side by side with my mom to try to get the hang of it. They used the exact same ingredients and seemed to use the same process. Nope, not the same result.

Not even my sister can do it like mom did. My wife, who is as good a cook as I've ever seen, can't do mom's pie crust.

Every Sunday when I was a kid, we had at minimum, one pie. Usually one fruit pie and one other. Some of my favorites (in no particular order):

Apple, peach, blueberry, pumpkin, pecan, rhubarb, strawberry-rhubarb, gooseberry, lemon meringue. She also made a killer sugar cream, but that had a graham cracker crust. For pumpkin, she used to cut up and boil down a pumpkin and season it herself. None of that canned filling stuff. If you've never had a pumpkin pie made from scratch, then you've never had pumpkin pie.

Her brothers flipped over the coconut cream and banana cream, but I'm not a fan of either, so never indulged.

There's a restaurant 30 miles south of me famous for the pie. People travel from all over just to get a slice of pie. Lines around the place on the weekends. I finally went in there once, and meh. Not bad, but not close to mom's. Certainly not worth a 30 mile one-way drive for pie, to me.

So, most challenging - mom's pie crust. Not that anyone will ever know now.

Sorry for the near irrelevance of the post given the circumstances, but thanks for the opportunity to relive some favorite memories.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Sep, 16 2011 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by yeahright
 


I really like your story! You know what your mom put in it that no one else can? Her Love! This is every mom's secret...
No one's love is quite the same as the affectionate and unconditional kind that springs forth from your mother's soul


Of course, this passes along to her hands and into your belly leaving only wonderful memories behind, hehehe



posted on Sep, 16 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by mblahnikluver
I have everything I need to make it, I just need the time now lol


Keep us posted regardless, I'm sure it will be culinary nirvana. I'm thinking of doing Asian this weekend, I have a craving for spring rolls and hot and sour soup and I'm luck enought to have a really good Asian market one town over.


I like Asian, it is actually the easiest I think. It just has a lot of steps lol I love it because you can really make it your own with just the basic recipe for say something like Miso Soup. You can make is so many ways and I like that and it still tastes great. I did Thai a few months back for my bf and it was great! I still have many of the ingredients I bought that will last for about a year so I might make Asian again soon!

The one thing I do have here is a good Asian market, everything else is hard to find. I use to live where there was a really nice European and Indian market. I miss those places!! I will be out that way next week. I might have to stop at both and stock up lol.

I did find a cool spice site!

Myspicesage They have pretty good prices and all kinds of spices depending on region or type of food. It is all categorized lol I love it!

I move in two weeks and I am going to be ordering from here so I can stock my new kitchen up!



posted on Sep, 17 2011 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by yeahright
 

Thanks for the memories, and the confirmation that pie crust isn't always easy. (I may have twisted your story to make myself feel better in that regard.. Please just indulge a frustrated baker...
)

You're lucky to have such a fine baker as your Mom.. My mother was/is a good baker and cook, but her pie crusts were never one to write home about. Maybe the fact that she insisted on making mincemeat... blargh.

I shall not give up. This fall and winter I am going to try to perfect two things: Pie Crusts and French Macarons..

Maybe I'd better join Weight Watchers as a precautionary measure...



posted on Sep, 18 2011 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by tabularasa
 


Salt peter is no longer used (not to my knowledge, or atleast by most professionals) in charcuterie. It has proven to be unstable and didn't provide consistent results. It's all based on sodium nitrite and nitrate. But, keeping the bacteria in its "corners" is still the same idea. Bacteria can be a wonderful, tasty thing.



posted on Sep, 21 2011 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by sleepypoet
 

Like I said, memories are quite blurred..
Maybe I'm remembering discussions of salt peter and we were really using nitrates.. Some day I'll unpack the old books and recipes to find out.. But yes, like you said, a bit of bacteria can be a good thing and provide some tasty results!



posted on Sep, 28 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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Real chocolate covered cherries were pretty tricky for me, until I got the system developed...

Basically, here's the order...

1) Melt the chocolate (I found the Wilton candy melter works absolutely wonderfully). You can use milk chocolate, dark chocolate, or white chocolate as you prefer. I like them all with this.
2) Using a small spoon, put about half a spoon's worth of chocolate in each mold.
3) Once all have chocolate in (about 1/2 full), use a brush to pull the chocolate up on the sides of the mold
4) When all are done, put in the freezer for 10 min.
5) Upon taking out, hold up to the light to look for any holes (the liquid center will ooze out of these, so can't have ANY).
6) If any holes, use the brush and some of the chocolate to fix, put back in the freezer for 5 min.

Usually, during this time, you're prepping the cherry center, and/or slicing cherries (if you have big cherries).

To make the center...

1) Put some confectioners sugar in a cup container
2) Pour some cherry juice in (get from the jar of maraschino cherries)
3) Mix until you have a thick but runny consistency, to where it slowly runs off the spoon.

Next step....

1) Remove molds from freezer
2) Put the cherry (or sliced cherry) in each mold
3) Use the spoon to put center liquid in, all around the cherry, and slightly covering it
4) Once done with all, put in the freezer for 5 min.

Next step....

1) Use the spoon, again, about half full, to cap each mold with chocolate. Be sure to not have a bulge in the center, top should be smooth.
2) Freeze for 10 min
3) Remove molds from freezer
4) Drop molds onto a firm table (lined with wax paper), to where you can lift up the mold, leaving the chocolate covered cherries on the wax paper
5) May have to drop a few times to get all of them out.

Let them get to room temperature before eating (or they will be pretty hard).

Then, enjoy!

Like I said, complex as hell, but so, so worth it. I can't even store-bought ones, but these are delicious. I make them for Thanksgiving and Christmas, and occasionally as an impressive thing to bring to parties.





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