Proto-Sumerian origin on text on a statue discovered in Peru! The riddle of the monolith of the Poko

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posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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Originally posted by ChungTsuU

Originally posted by TheLoneArcher
Much of our past is hidden and or yet undiscovered. However, why have they hidden it from us?
What are they afraid of?


Losing control of the masses who work to support TPTB! They have created a fear based system that if one questions, they have historically been arrested, sanctioned, excommunicated, or my favorite...killed.

Regards and Nameste,

-Chung


So, everyone on ATS that constantly questions this supposed "TPTB" has been arrested?

Sometimes I wonder if worms are posting here, given the depth of thought (or absence thereof) that is evidenced here every day.


Originally posted by lonewolf19792000

Originally posted by jhn7537
When scholars decipher an ancient (dead) language how do they know if their work is correct?


They don't 100% its an "educated guess". Archeaologists reverse engineered Sumerian by using the Babylonian cuneiform or i should say Zecharia Sitchin since he worked on decoding the Sumerian language for 30+ years. The Hebrew peoples learned babylonian during their exile around 300 B.C. during the reign of Nebuchadnezar II, and it was from these older manuscripts that archeaologists were able to piece together a rough understanding of Sumerian.


As Hans (as usual) so correctly stated, the above is total BS.

I'd like to add that the Akkadians actually left behind Akkadian-Sumerian dictionaries and lexicons. This made it possible to translate Sumerian quite well.

The Akkadian language was translatable because it a member of the Semitic language group, which still has active subgroups being spoken today (as I hope everyone here knows.)

Harte




posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


The problem is that the bowl in question was found by a farmer and who wouldn't show where he found it other to say it was a cave. The bigger issue is how do you prove it was actually found there? Especially since the museem curator who got it from the farmer in the 50's has been tied to several other fakes over the years. It likely is a real sumerian bowl but probally not found in bolivia.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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Originally posted by exile1981
reply to post by Majestic Lumen
 


The problem is that the bowl in question was found by a farmer and who wouldn't show where he found it other to say it was a cave. The bigger issue is how do you prove it was actually found there? Especially since the museem curator who got it from the farmer in the 50's has been tied to several other fakes over the years. It likely is a real sumerian bowl but probally not found in bolivia.



Yeah the two holy words in Archaeology; Provenance and context.

Oh and to clarify that word isn't 'provenience' which refers to the three dimensional location of an item within an excavation
edit on 9/9/11 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 03:22 PM
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This geographical area is filled with mysteries. I don't remember if it's in Chile or Peru but there's a kind of fortress being guarded by statues strikingly similar to those found at Easter Island. This could mean sailors came to this part of the world crossing the pacific or perhaps from a lost continent in the Pacific?



posted on Sep, 10 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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reply to post by thyextendedself
 


There was extensive trade between Easter is. and the mainland starting around the 11th century. And there is an ancient coastal city in Peru that is being excavated that's shows the culturL link between the island and mainland. The islanders stoppped travelling to the mainland after they comletely deforested the islands and were no longer able to make the large sea going canoes needed for the trip. The social chaos that ensued after the degradation of the islands environment also caused the mainlanders and the other polynesians to stop visiting the islands. So its not surprising to find some cultural similarities between the islands y areas on the mainland.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 01:47 AM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by thyextendedself
 


There was extensive trade between Easter is. and the mainland starting around the 11th century. And there is an ancient coastal city in Peru that is being excavated that's shows the culturL link between the island and mainland. The islanders stoppped travelling to the mainland after they comletely deforested the islands and were no longer able to make the large sea going canoes needed for the trip. The social chaos that ensued after the degradation of the islands environment also caused the mainlanders and the other polynesians to stop visiting the islands. So its not surprising to find some cultural similarities between the islands y areas on the mainland.


Howdy Punkinworks10

"Extensive trade"?? Which city is this that is being excavated?



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hi Hans, maybe extensive wasn't the best term, but there was enough interchange between the island and mainland that certain motifs have been found on the island and mainland, within a corresponding time frame. I believe the site is very near Tucume,Peru. It was found in the mid '90's and its location is where Hyerdall predicted a port city could be found. It is the one location where the currents and winds will take you to and from Easter island. I read about it in an archeology journal several years ago.



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 01:20 AM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hi Hans, maybe extensive wasn't the best term, but there was enough interchange between the island and mainland that certain motifs have been found on the island and mainland, within a corresponding time frame. I believe the site is very near Tucume,Peru. It was found in the mid '90's and its location is where Hyerdall predicted a port city could be found. It is the one location where the currents and winds will take you to and from Easter island. I read about it in an archeology journal several years ago.


Howdy

I've always been of the mind that the Polynesians would have pushed on to SA.

I've been following the archaelogical reports involving the off lying islands of the west coast of SA since the early 80's- as of yet no evidence has been found that supports that however AFAIK.
edit on 12/9/11 by Hanslune because: Added comment



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hi Hans, I remembered something from the article, the researchers had found a a string of characters carved into something that matched a string of characters found on a rongrongo tablet from rapa nui. I'm of the opinon that contact between the island and mainland was only for a brief period and mostly one way ,from the mainland and back. Something I find interesting is the similarity of masonry styles between rapa nui and some of the Peruvian cultures.
Back to the original notion of this thread, although mesopotamian sailors traded with the coastal indus valley city-states it it improbable that they made it to south America and then climbed high into the andes tow carve inscriptions on rocks. After all they were saliors and sailors tend to stay near what they know, the water.



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Hanslune
 


Hi Hans, I remembered something from the article, the researchers had found a a string of characters carved into something that matched a string of characters found on a rongrongo tablet from rapa nui. I'm of the opinon that contact between the island and mainland was only for a brief period and mostly one way ,from the mainland and back. Something I find interesting is the similarity of masonry styles between rapa nui and some of the Peruvian cultures.
Back to the original notion of this thread, although mesopotamian sailors traded with the coastal indus valley city-states it it improbable that they made it to south America and then climbed high into the andes tow carve inscriptions on rocks. After all they were saliors and sailors tend to stay near what they know, the water.


I don't recall that article at all - if you ever come across it let me know. Based on the limited Sumerian and Dilmun naval technology anything beyond coastal trade is speculative at best. Could they have gotten to Peru? Possible but hardly likely and extremely unlikely that they would have taken along a scribe and a stone worker to put in those characters!

However I'm always reluctant to limit the abilities of the ancients, they were as smart as us and only needed a Prince Henry or a man of wisdom to do something extraordinary.

If the Polynesians got to SA their technology and limited numbers and the rather sophicated war skills of the SA people of that time would have made their stay rather short I suspect.





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