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'Supernova of a Generation': Brightest Exploding Star in 40 Years Spotted

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posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


very cool, thanks for posting!




posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by Idonthaveabeard
 



So did this star actually go supernova millions of years ago and is now gone, or is it actually going supernova now?


21 million years ago. Pretty mind blowing huh?



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 02:46 PM
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I hope the clouds go away so I can see it. This sounds awesome.
I already got my binoculars ready



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 03:22 PM
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Originally posted by Domo1
reply to post by Idonthaveabeard
 



So did this star actually go supernova millions of years ago and is now gone, or is it actually going supernova now?


21 million years ago. Pretty mind blowing huh?



Yea its kool, I find the fact that this star disappeared 20 million years ago yet we can still see it mind blowing


Hypotheticall speaking, say its gamma ray bursts did head towards us, would they have hit us already or would they be hitting us in the future? Im guessing in the future as gamma rays would take longer to arrive travelling slower than light?



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by Idonthaveabeard
 


Gamma rays are light. Just very energetic (more energetic than X-rays)

The EM spectrum, in order of energy, from least energetic to most energetic:

radio - microwave - infrared - visible - ultraviolet - X-ray - Gamma ray.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by repressed
 


So they would actually be hitting us at the same time we are able to view the event? I don't have a firm understanding of any of this stuff so any help would be most appreciated.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by Domo1
 


This supernova is too far from us to cause any damage to us our our planet, or the magnetic fields. A similar case is Betelgese (α Ori) from Orion that is also in a soon-to-go-supernova phase. But like for any star it is unpredictable when that can happen - it could be now, it could be in millions of years. So don't count on Betelgese although it would appear as a second sun for some time, some scuentist say.

So it is unique that one can see this event as really, one does not know if another supernova would happen in their lifetime. It is very exciting! Too bad I dont have a telescope at the moment, who knows, could speed up buying a new one. IF what they say is correct, you may not need 200mm (8 inch) reflector to see it, binoculars could do the trick if it becomes as visible as the Pleiades or the galaxies in Orion.

But even with such larger telescopes, galaxies, clusters and such do not appear colorful the way you see them in everyday pictures. There is not enough light to be collected by the telescopes frm Earth. It would be likely a grey-ish glowing cloud with its shape still as it is, that's how clusters and galaxies usually look. Still, this will be a good feeling that you are watching something like that!

M101 - Magnitude 7.79 meaning not visible to the naked eye and at least a small school telescope that is also better than binoculars. But is the galaxy, the supernova is huge so you may see something that currently is not visible.Let;s see when it happens.
edit on 4-9-2011 by Imtor because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 09:54 PM
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Wow, it's small but when you realise what it is, you understand how big it is.

Yet it is in such an unassuming area. It has no effect on anything surrounding it.

Interesting, 21 million light years away.. It's funny to think that in 1 light year, it will be visible to whoever is 1 light year away from us, but for us it will just be darkness.

Given that, I wonder how much of the sky is an illusion.



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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Bumping this so that more people see it. Don't want anyone to miss the event!


reg

posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by Mogget
If it's 21 million light years distant, then it exploded 21 million years ago. However, the light from the supernova has only just reached us, so we get to see it now.


Ya know, no matter how hard I try to comprehend it, it's nearly impossible for me to get my head around such things, lol. It's like when they go on about black holes and say it is so dense that a tea spoon would weigh several million tonnes (have I got that right?) Such things make me want to curl up in the foetal position and cry to my mummy...

Seriously though the universe is amazing.

Also does anyone here know my chances of seeing this from the U.K? providing it's not cloudy and raining.... which it will be


S+F
edit on 6-9-2011 by reg because: mistake



posted on Sep, 6 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by Domo1
reply to post by Idonthaveabeard
 



So did this star actually go supernova millions of years ago and is now gone, or is it actually going supernova now?


21 million years ago. Pretty mind blowing huh?


well what teh crap...

ok, so lets say we see an asteroid thats just a bit further in distance than the sun.
it's light takes 8-9 minutes to get here?

how do we calculate these things??



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