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Disappearance of glacial river stuns B.C. hikers

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posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 10:53 AM
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A river just disappears from one of the most fresh water rich Countries in the World?

Had to look twice at the photos here:
www.cbc.ca...

While the photos are beautiful, they shouldn't exist. Global Warming? Perhaps. Or maybe just a cycle of our planet. Either way, it's still interesting.

news.ca.msn.com...

One of the glacial rivers feeding a large lake straddling the Yukon-British Columbia border has dried up, hikers say, turning a normally fast-running watercourse into a muddy field strewn with icebergs.

"We were able to walk right into the river bed and stand among the 60-foot icebergs that are grounded now," said Diana Thayer of Atlin, B.C., who came across the phenomenon while hiking near the Llewellyn Glacier along the Sloko Inlet trail in late August.

"It just seemed the plug had been pulled on a bathtub."




posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Wow! Thats crazy. Things are changing fast on this planet and not for the better. What do you think is the cause?



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by iksose7
reply to post by jude11
 


Wow! Thats crazy. Things are changing fast on this planet and not for the better. What do you think is the cause?


it looks like the source is blocked....


Sloko Inlet dried up, probably because ice dammed its source off the Llewellyn Glacier,
source
edit on 3/9/11 by Versa because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by iksose7
reply to post by jude11
 


Wow! Thats crazy. Things are changing fast on this planet and not for the better. What do you think is the cause?


I've been there and seen the area. No idea whatsoever actually. I'm still wrapping my head around it just disappearing.

Rivers don't just disappear.



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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Originally posted by Versa

Originally posted by iksose7
reply to post by jude11
 


Wow! Thats crazy. Things are changing fast on this planet and not for the better. What do you think is the cause?



Sloko Inlet dried up, probably because ice dammed its source off the Llewellyn Glacier,
source


I read that as well. So the question is why a sudden ice build up? They did have a colder summer than usual so that may be a factor.



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 11:04 AM
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The ice dam idea makes a lot of sense. If there are '60 ft icebergs' left standing in the river bed, it's not so far fetched to see how they could block the water farther up stream. Just don't be standing there when they melt and the dam breaks.



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 11:05 AM
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S+F Excellent Find Jude,

The fact they will have to re-draw the maps shows how big and new this event is.

Unfortunately this is a worldwide growing trend.

With the mis direction, lobbying, funding chasing and msm lies over this many forget that in REALITY this is happening very quick and worldwide:



From the Alps to the Andes, the world's glaciers are retreating at an accelerated pace - despite the recent controversy over claims by the United Nations' body of experts, leading climate scientists said today.

The World Glacier Monitoring Service shows a similar picture. In a 2005 survey of 442 glaciers, 398 - or 90% - were retreating, 18 were stationary and 26 were advancing.

Thompson, who has been studying glaciers in the Andes for more than 30 years, said he had watched the loss in his own lifetime. A number of the region's glaciers have disappeared. Venezuela, which had six glaciers when he first began as a graduate student in the early 1970s, now has only two small ice masses which Thompson thought would be gone within ten years. An Andean glacier that had been melting at a pace of six metres a year 40 years ago is now disappearing at a rate of 60 metres a year, he said.
Gaurdian

Some of the data and photos over periods of time I have seen are very worrying.

Kind Regards,

Elf


edit on 3-9-2011 by MischeviousElf because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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Originally posted by MischeviousElf
S+F Excellent Find Jude,

The fact they will have to re-draw the maps shows how big and new this event is.

Unfortunately this is a worldwide growing trend.

With the mis direction, lobbying, funding chasing and msm lies over this many forget that in REALITY this is happening very quick and worldwide:


The glaciers have been going into melt down mode for awhile and yes, many are not paying attention.

In this case I believe it may be due to the long, colder than usual summer that stopped the flow. But that still makes me question what is happening since the glaciers usually melt all summer.



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Hey Jude, great post and props to the CBC for making this national news...although I'm not too familiar with their website...
Check out the timestamp under the headers of the article!

"Posted: Dec 31, 1969 7:00 PM GMT"



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by BernardShakey
reply to post by jude11
 


Hey Jude, great post and props to the CBC for making this national news...although I'm not too familiar with their website...
Check out the timestamp under the headers of the article!

"Posted: Dec 31, 1969 7:00 PM GMT"



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by jude11
Rivers don't just disappear.


Actually, they do.

Rivers aren't forever. In Dallas, where I live, the Trinity River has only been around for 12,000 years. They appear in areas where rainfall is over 25 inches per year (rain fed rivers OR where an aquifer hits the air (spring fed rivers) or glacial melt runs off (glacial melt). Most are a combination of streams from two or more sources.

The Trinity River (my watershed) has a history of appearing and disappearing because the headwaters lie in a semiarid area. In the 1800's they tried to start steamboat travel from Houston to Dallas... the steamboat took a year and a day to arrive in Dallas because the river would appear, disappear, and then flood (of course. It's Texas, after all.)

When rain fed rivers or glacial rivers lose their source (too cold to melt the ice OR the climate becomes dryer) the rivers dry up and go away. The world is filled with the remains of ancient, dead rivers... you just have to know what you're looking for (a friendly book on local geology will get you started) to spot them.



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 06:45 PM
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Originally posted by BernardShakey
reply to post by jude11
Check out the timestamp under the headers of the article!

"Posted: Dec 31, 1969 7:00 PM GMT"



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


I can recall a few instances of people reporting that rivers have disappeared. Just google it. I recall one that dried overnight as it was redirected underground by seismic activity. Considering the amount of earthquakes in and around Alaska, it wouldn't surprise me if they found ground elevation was the cause of this river coming to a halt.



posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Actually it would be due to more ice than usual sloughing off the glacier, which would possibly indicate warmer temperatures (or seismic activity, or even plain dumb luck, really)



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