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Jovian Mass Solar Companion In The Oort Cloud

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posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by excalibrate
 


I don't believe that is a good example of what our solar system looks like.

The important thing to remember is that no object has been found in the outer reaches of the solar system. Furthermore, details scans out as far as the Kuiper belt have turned up nothing larger than a Pluto sized object.




posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by excalibrate
 


I don't believe that is a good example of what our solar system looks like.

The important thing to remember is that no object has been found in the outer reaches of the solar system. Furthermore, details scans out as far as the Kuiper belt have turned up nothing larger than a Pluto sized object.


It is also important to remember that we don't have a complete understanding of the physics within the Solar system:

Is the physics within the Solar system really understood?
C. Lammerzahl, O. Preuss, and H. Dittus
ZARM, University of Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen, Germany
2 Max–Planck–Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2,
37191 Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany
February 7, 2008
arxiv.org...

Therefore your statement is valid. We have not found a new Jupiter mass object in our Solar system. Yet. But there exists a preponderance of scientific data to support the hypothesis that such an object exists, and that binary systems are not the exception but are in fact common.


Originally posted by ElectricUniverse

Not to long ago the mention of Nemesis, or a companion brown dwarf existing within the Solar System would just bring a chuckle to many, even though ancient cultures have left us messages about it. Now science is bringing us closer to the truth.
Scientific Research on Solar System Brown Dwarf and Planet X
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Apparently some uninformed persons remain content to continue to "chuckle" at the mounting evidence, and the messages of ancient cultures. Oh well. To each his own.
edit on 9/11/2011 by this_is_who_we_are because: typos



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by this_is_who_we_are

Therefore your statement is valid. We have not found a new Jupiter mass object in our Solar system. Yet. But there exists a preponderance of scientific data to support the hypothesis that such an object exists, and that binary systems are not the exception but are in fact common.



I don't think it has ever been assumed that binary systems aren't common. But they are not in the majority.


In this Letter I compare recent findings suggesting a low binary star fraction for late-type stars with knowledge concerning the forms of the stellar initial and present-day mass functions for masses down to the hydrogen-burning limit. This comparison indicates that most stellar systems formed in the Galaxy are likely single and not binary, as has been often asserted. Indeed, in the current epoch two-thirds of all main-sequence stellar systems in the Galactic disk are composed of single stars. Some implications of this realization for understanding the star and planet formation process are briefly mentioned.

iopscience.iop.org...

It actually seems that the odds are not that good that the Sun has a stellar companion. In our "neighborhood" only 33% of the sun-like stars are binary and the majority of those systems consist of stars of similar types (sun-like stars have sun-like companions). Recent studies show that the odds go down, way down, when considering a brown dwarf as a binary companion. Brown dwarfs tend to have brown dwarfs for companions, sun-like stars have sun-like stars.
www.deepfly.org...

If a massive companion to the Sun is found it would not be the norm.
edit on 9/11/2011 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 08:54 PM
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reply to post by this_is_who_we_are
 


The paper you linked to is fairly interesting. I read it over a year ago. I want to point out that the issues mentioned are not large and that the Pioneer anomaly has been explained.

Pioneer Anomaly is Fading

Regardless of whether or not this is the explanation it is a small, but measurable effect. The other issues are also small, but measurable.

Despite these interesting issues, we still know that the important and overriding factor forming the solar system is gravity.

I do thank you for bringing this issue to light since it shows people here at ATS that not everything is known and not all scientists agree with the explanations for the detected issues.


We have not found a new Jupiter mass object in our Solar system. Yet. But there exists a preponderance of scientific data to support the hypothesis that such an object exists, and that binary systems are not the exception but are in fact common.

I have never stated that no Jupiter sized mass cannot exist in the solar system. What I have stated is that such an object must be far away and never enter the orbits of the known planets.

Also, there is no preponderance of evidence to support the idea of this object existing or the Sun being in a binary system. The fact is that there is no evidence for such an object. A sum total of 0 evidence is hardly a preponderance.
edit on 11-9-2011 by stereologist because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by this_is_who_we_are

I have never stated that no Jupiter sized mass cannot exist in the solar system. What I have stated is that such an object must be far away and never enter the orbits of the known planets.


Why must it never enter the orbits of the known planets? We're actually conversing for a change (nifty, isn't it?).
edit on 9/11/2011 by this_is_who_we_are because: typo



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 07:23 AM
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reply to post by this_is_who_we_are
 


Any mass orbiting the Sun, entering the inner solar system, would be on a highly elliptical orbit. When that mass passes closer to the Sun there is a transfer of momentum. This happens whether or not the orbital path is highly elliptical. The Moon moves away from the Earth and the Earth away from the Sun. I believe it was Shoemacher that showed that the upshot of this was that the orbit would become:
1. less elliptical
2. the object would be ejected from the solar system

This is why the Nemesis idea was dropped. The proposed orbit would not be stable. The object settles into a less elliptical orbit or is tossed out of the system. With the age of the solar system an object that has an orbit even in the tens of millions of years would have settled down or been ejected billions of years ago.



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