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Ojibwa bird pole: Another useful snare

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posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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This has been used for hundreds of years by Native Americans... The trap is set in a clearing or field and acts as a perch for unsuspecting birds. The pole is about 4ft in height and the snare wire is attached to a stone, which is kept in place by a thin pencil sized stick. When the bird lands on the perch, its weight will force the pencil sized stick down and the snare will tighten around the birds feet suspending upside down in the air ready for collection…don’t use too heavy a stone otherwise you might take the legs clean off!

I had one set up in my garden to keep the birds out of the new planted seeds... I didn't kill the red wing black birds I kept catching I'd let em dangle and make a ruckus... a warning to their bird brothers to what was going to happen if I caught them in my gardens... kind of became a game and I bet I caught and released the same couple of birds at least a dozen times...



youtu.be...

edit on 31-8-2011 by DaddyBare because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:58 AM
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I absolutely love your survivalist posts. Always handy and informative, and you included picture to save this time too.

Thanks man! Your work is most appreciated.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 12:07 PM
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Thats awesome! The only trouble I could see you having is drilling the hole? Other than that, this is a great idea and probably works more often then not!



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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reply to post by theshepherd2
 


You could purchase a 'yankee' or push drill.
No power needed!!! Very handy tool.

www.garrettwade.com...[creative]&EID=Garrett+Wade&gclid=CNytgvKG-qoCFYXb4AodMVPpWA



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by theshepherd2
 
A penknife or the awl blade found on most multitools will drill a hole through a piece of wood fairly quickly.

The Ojibwa had no steel tools when they first made this snare, they used a long pointed sliver of stone.

The real survival talent is making cordage out of natural vegetable fibers if you don't have any string.


edit on 31-8-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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Love this! I've learned alot of different snaring techniques growing up and in the USMC, I must've been asleep somewhere for this one! I've been training my boys to live off the land and I can't wait to take my them and try it out!! Thanks for this and all your posts!



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by SumerianSoldier
 


With all due respect to my beloved Corps...
this is one of those... gotta be a Red Skin to know.... tricks...

And you know I was stationed up in Bridgeport at the mountain warfare school for 6 years as a Red Hat trainer.... hundreds of Marines came through and I never once thought to teach any of them this one...????

Bet I would have remembered if ya needed a beer bottle and a pound of C4....



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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Why put the over hand knot at the base of the perch?? I'm just curious, I understand the loop knot but not the overhand knot..Is this a necessity in order for it to work or can i just let the dead fall of the rock close the slip knot freely?
edit on 31-8-2011 by NewsWorthy because: misspelling



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by NewsWorthy
 


The overhand knot holds the loop end in place while the stick is in-place...
without it... the wire/string would just slip out from under the stick... everything has to be fit lose lose lose...
so lose it wont work on a windy day
edit on 31-8-2011 by DaddyBare because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by NewsWorthy
Why put the over hand knot at the base of the perch?? I'm just curious, I understand the loop knot but not the overhand knot..Is this a necessity in order for it to work or can i just let the dead fall of the rock close the slip knot freely?
edit on 31-8-2011 by NewsWorthy because: misspelling
The overhand knot keeps the string from pulling through alongside the perch stick. If you rely on the perch to hold the string, the perch will be too tight to trigger the snare when a bird lands on it. Small birds are very light.

Darn it, DB, you beat me to it.

edit on 31-8-2011 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


Great minds think alike...
second line: Hey Twinkies are survival food, honest!
edit on 31-8-2011 by DaddyBare because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 01:19 PM
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I will file this one in memory

I love your survival articles and resipes
Keep them comeing,...thanks



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 01:33 PM
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Ah I get it..Thanks guys! I can't wait ta see if my girlfriend knows this snare...Have you guys ever seen the Grass snare for Lizards?? she just did it while we we're camping/fishing and was catching so many lizards with no effort at all...It's just a long piece of grass with a semi-loose over under knot at the end...I guess the lizards aren't threatened by the grass so they let it slip over their necks with no fuss..Maybe they're not the greatest food but in a survival situation it'll feed ya with little effort on a warm day.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 06:09 PM
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Originally posted by HardyWhite
reply to post by theshepherd2
 


You could purchase a 'yankee' or push drill.
No power needed!!! Very handy tool.

www.garrettwade.com...[creative]&EID=Garrett+Wade&gclid=CNytgvKG-qoCFYXb4AodMVPpWA


A narrow notch in the wood rather than a hole would also hold the cross piece well enough. In fact, the drawing seems to show a notch in one depictation.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 06:19 PM
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This brilliant snare rig brings to mind that a simple hacksaw blade can be a very useful, lightweight and durable survivial tool. It would be useful if not critical to those less skillful in doing fairly close-tolearance work with small pieces of wood. A few turns of electrical tape can provide a passable "handle."

Other uses can be for cutting metal such as fashioning cans into cooking and eating containers, cutting chains, locks, electrical wiring, etc. (Sorry, didn't mean to derail the thread.)


edit on 31-8-2011 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 05:27 AM
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That is pretty cool. looks simple enough to make and it sounds like a nifty tool for several different reasons. thanks for taking the time to share with the rest of us



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 07:13 PM
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Have heard of this one but never bothered to look too close. I know of one that one of coastal natives sometimes used lol. He poked a hole in the center of a round laundry basket and hung a bait on a snelled hook with about 4 inches of line. then propped it on a stake like the old rabbit box trap, with a piece of twine that ties the basket to the stake then baited seagulls with broken mussels. When I first saw one in action, I was actually rolling on the sand I was laughing so hard. Then the realization came that my friends uncle was eating seagulls.


Back to the OP. I dont see this as being very effective except in barren landscapes and place on a high point. But I was thinking if you cut the perch end with a knife and slipped a hard dry leaf in the end, you would have a seed n snack tray to get them to land a whole lot more often. Looking from above, 'c' being the main stick, dashes being the perch and 'o' being the leaf stuck in the end> c------0

traps and baits like peas and carrots.



posted on Sep, 7 2011 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by HardyWhite
 


Which happens to be one of the tools in my collection...which reminds me that I really need to do that video that I have been putting off going through some basic hand tools.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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reply to post by Shadowalker
 



Then the realization came that my friends uncle was eating seagulls.
I have read and been told that they taste fishy.

It makes sense that they would. Not on my menu, yet!



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