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Earth and Moon pic from 6 million miles away....Why is there no other planets/stars seen??

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posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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I was reading the news this morning and it had a pic of the Earth and Moon from Juno spacecraft heading to Jupiter. Currently it is about 6 million miles and still traveling but I had a question as to why there is no other points of light in this pic???Surely if the Moon and Earth are reflecting this much light then other stars/planets/comets should be reflecting some light and be visible right??? I am no expert in space stuff but seemed odd to me and I just wanted a second opinion from people who study this sorta thing..Also if it's a Camera issue, why is Nasa spending all this money to send a satellite to Jupiter but loading it up with Walmart brand Cameras??? I can get more stars on a disposable camera at night, which is why I thought it sorta strange to see no stars..Any help would be nice..Thanks Every1!! heres the link I pulled the Pic from

www.theregister.co.uk...




posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:11 AM
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Maybe they are edited out so that you can see earth and the moon easier?



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:12 AM
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There is no light in space, the only light you see is what is reflected from plaents and such

It probably has to do with the angle the photo is taken from and where the other planets are in relation to it.

Space does not look like the night sky



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by NewsWorthy
 


Not certain if I'm right, however they probably simply took the rest out... from that distance it would be distracting, the average viewer *myself* would be saying, well... where is the earth and the moon?

E



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:15 AM
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I've been complaining about the same thing for years. NASA is still using my grandmother's cameras and they really do need to return them to her and buy some K-mart disposables that pick up stars in the background.

If you or I went out into space, to a point where the Earth's light wasn't blocking out stars, we would not see any "black" in space, it would look like snow on the TV screen from all the star light. BUT, NASA can and probably is using the shutter speeds to get the kind of picture they want, though I would like to see clear high definition shots from space with vivid colors.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by JibbyJedi
I've been complaining about the same thing for years. NASA is still using my grandmother's cameras and they really do need to return them to her and buy some K-mart disposables that pick up stars in the background.

If you or I went out into space, to a point where the Earth's light wasn't blocking out stars, we would not see any "black" in space, it would look like snow on the TV screen from all the star light. BUT, NASA can and probably is using the shutter speeds to get the kind of picture they want, though I would like to see clear high definition shots from space with vivid colors.


Really? Disregard my post then



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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There is no light in space
reply to post by Celestica
 
I will have to differ with this.

It takes about 8 minutes for light from the sun to reach the earth.Source

Where is that light at for those 8 minutes?

I have to say it is in space.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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the above explanations all seem tenable so far

also, to me it looks like a relatively far distance we are used to seeing, so my impression is that its such a close zoom from so far away

would also love to hear from an expert if the stars would have been edited out or if its just the shutter/type of image taken causes space to be blacked out from nearby stars/objects



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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If we are this alone we must inevitably stop fighting each other to get ready to explore the vastness of space together. Not as a world nation but many nations whom all seek the same goal. To drop our differences here and explore whats out there and beyond.. I wish they would release more!



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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Thanks for the replys every1...I didn't think about maybe it would be to clustered to notice earth if they didn't edit it out..And we all know they Doctor every Photo released for one reason or another so that would make sense..



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:18 AM
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Space does look like the night sky, even better sometimes.

The reason some of these photographs have limited amounts of objects in them is most likely due to the light intensity of the objects and the camera's sensitivity, etc.

Consider this, in the daytime, do you see many stars other than the sun? Why?

Because the ambient light is far too bright and it easily drowns out tiny light sources such as distant stars.

That's why you don't see many stars in the moon landing photos, because the daytime sun on the moon is extremely bright.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by butcherguy



There is no light in space
reply to post by Celestica
 
I will have to differ with this.

It takes about 8 minutes for light from the sun to reach the earth.Source

Where is that light at for those 8 minutes?

I have to say it is in space.



I guess a better way for me to say that would be, there is nothing in space itself for the light to reflect off of and illuminate, so that in laymans terms would be - there is no light in space



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by Celestica
 
No offense, dear, but I was really about to ask if someone could post a 'facepalm' graphic for me.

By way of some small education, you might appreciate this video on the Hubble telescope's Ultra deep field image - they tried to take a picture of a blank bit of space the size a grain of sand would be if you held it out at arm's length, roughly - amazing:



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash
Space does look like the night sky, even better sometimes.

The reason some of these photographs have limited amounts of objects in them is most likely due to the light intensity of the objects and the camera's sensitivity, etc.

Consider this, in the daytime, do you see many stars other than the sun? Why?

Because the ambient light is far too bright and it easily drowns out tiny light sources such as distant stars.

That's why you don't see many stars in the moon landing photos, because the daytime sun on the moon is extremely bright.


I thought maybe the Sun was drowning everything out but what made me second guess it was there wasn't even a glimmer of Venus or anything else reflecting light..Maybe they are not visible from the angle the pic was taken but I would think there would be Stars behind the Earth still bright enough to show some type of light...I wish they woulda took/released an IR image or whatever it is that they use to see through our suns blinding light when looking for neighboring things.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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Probably for the same reason there are no stars in many of the Apollo photos. The correct exposure for the earth and the moon (or the astrounauts and the moon) rendered the stars too dim to show up. It's also a very blurry low res photo and stars are point sources of light.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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All of the above or else it is a fake.
And a crappy effort at that!
Just like most everything else NASA has presented to the public!



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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Originally posted by Praetorius
reply to post by Celestica
 
No offense, dear, but I was really about to ask if someone could post a 'facepalm' graphic for me.

By way of some small education, you might appreciate this video on the Hubble telescope's Ultra deep field image - they tried to take a picture of a blank bit of space the size a grain of sand would be if you held it out at arm's length, roughly - amazing:


I don't see anything wrong with my post, or any need to "facepalm"

In the video you posted space is also portrayed as completely black unless looking directly at the sun. As I just said above ^^ in laymans terms - no light in space, more in depth - there is nothing in space itself for light to reflect off of and illuminate. as someone else said, it probably has to do with the exposure. the hubble telescope absorbed light for 10 whole days, im sure this photograph was much quicker.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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reply to post by Praetorius
 
Thanks for the Hubble link! That is amazing.

Makes a person feel very small.



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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Originally posted by Praetorius
reply to post by Celestica
 
No offense, dear, but I was really about to ask if someone could post a 'facepalm' graphic for me.

By way of some small education, you might appreciate this video on the Hubble telescope's Ultra deep field image - they tried to take a picture of a blank bit of space the size a grain of sand would be if you held it out at arm's length, roughly - amazing:



That Video's Awesome!! I have seen the Images of this study but never the 3D video..thanks for sharing



posted on Aug, 31 2011 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by Celestica
 
My apologies for wording and not clarifying that better - that's my bad.

The part I was taking issue with was this:

There is no light in space, the only light you see is what is reflected from plaents and such

It probably has to do with the angle the photo is taken from and where the other planets are in relation to it.


Plenty of light out there from stars, galaxies, nebulas and all that fun stuff that shows up in the hubble images and everything else we have access to...planets don't really figure in a great deal.

You're definitely correct in the main point, generally space is very dark otherwise - I would assume our atmosphere and the rim of the earth blocking out the sunlight that interferes with normal viewing are what makes the starts stand out so beautifully when seen from earth.

My apologies again, didn't intend to offend.


edit on 8/31/2011 by Praetorius because: (no reason given)



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