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Theoretical fusion reactor design

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posted on Aug, 21 2004 @ 08:27 PM
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Recently I have come up with a possible way to create a (hot) fusion reactor, but the design is still pretty rough. Basically it consists of surrounding a core of fsoin material with uranium rods to raise the temperature of the core. Also surrounding the core is a large electromagnet to contain the fusion plasma, as well as pressurize it. Basically this kind of looks like the rssian tokomak (sp?) fusion reactor but without the donut shape. The uranium rods are held in place around the core by the electromagnetic force, so if there is a failure of some sort they can be dropped out of position to prevent a meltdown. The rods raise the temperature of the core as high as possible with melting down, and the pressure from the electomagnet causes the fusoin materials to reach the necessary temperature. As soon as the fusion reaction starts the uranium rods are dropped by turning the magnet off for a moment, then turning it back on. No, wait, that won;t work. Instead have a second magnet that holds the rods in place.

Like I said it's still rough and once I refine the design some more I'll post my drawings.

I recognize the potential danger of this design, namely it still is radioactive at the beginnning and could easily turn into a giant bomb instead of a functioning powerplant.


NOTE: If anyone has some knowledge as to how current fusion reactors work please post so I may further refine my design or setermine that it own't work.




posted on Aug, 22 2004 @ 08:13 PM
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I have no real knowledge of fusion reactor design, but your idea sounds pretty sound to me.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 04:42 AM
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How do you use the uranium rods to raise the temperature? You need very high temperatures, that can't be achieved by using uranium as a radioactive source or by using the rods to coduct the thermal energy.

You should also check that the uranium isn't affected by the electromagnetic field. That electromagnetic should be so strong to contain the plasma, that it would probably rip the rods out of their positions, if they were affected by the electromagnetic field.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 04:58 AM
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Sorry to say this, but if you are going to use fissionable material, you might as well build a fission reactor. The whole point of a fusion reactor is to try to get away from high radioactive byproducts.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 06:27 AM
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Originally posted by Sigma
Sorry to say this, but if you are going to use fissionable material, you might as well build a fission reactor. The whole point of a fusion reactor is to try to get away from high radioactive byproducts.


There are several reasons to build a fusion reactor even if it needs uranium rods in the process.
1) a fusion reaction releases much more energy than a fission one.
2) my design should only need the uranium rods in the beginning to raise the temp.

Like I said it's still very rough and might not actually work.



posted on Aug, 23 2004 @ 09:58 PM
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Nice work, but Im afraid your plutonium rods will melt long before you achieve a fusion reaction. I would suggest that you change direction a little and apply your energies toward helping to perfect helium 3 reactors. From what I read these will be the key to both a healthy society, and mankinds future in space.
Good luck

Here are a few links to get you started

www.totse.com...

www.space.com...

www.asi.org...





[edit on 23-8-2004 by Taeas]



posted on Aug, 24 2004 @ 06:45 AM
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Interesting links Taeas. I've revised my plans to utilize a bead-type reactor for the both the uranium and the fusion elements. I could possibly post a recent design later today, it's almost done.



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 03:43 PM
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I don't know too much about Fusion or Physics for that matter but think this machine maybe doing something VERY similar to what you have suggested.

www.sandia.gov...

[edit on 25-8-2004 by build319]



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 05:31 PM
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heh, don't forget www.fusor.net... .... a fusion reactor (really!) you can build in your garage. just don't expect to get more power out of it then you're putting into it. it's nothing like your design, really, but it's work taking a quick peek at for inspiration.

[edit on 25-8-2004 by sisonek]


MBF

posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 09:47 PM
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Uranium melts at 1850C so the rods will not help you any.



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 11:27 PM
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you are trying to mix a fission and fusion reactor or what?

your design sounds pretty flawed to me, sorry. Plasma temperatures run in excess of 20 million kelvin, temperatures at which uranium cannot handle.

Also, methods for increasing the temperature of a p lasma have been studied in depth for the 'tokomak' design, such as Cyclotron heating, neutral beam injecting.....

Even if the uranium rods weren't directly in the plasma, the neutrons released from the 'fusion' process are very energetic and most likely would not interact with the uranium nucleus enough to cause significant increase in heating.



posted on Aug, 25 2004 @ 11:32 PM
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Holding Plasma with magnetic fields has proved to be harder then anyone has ever thought. It like holding jello with rubber bands.

Alot of new fusion reactors have run into this problem



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