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WTF??? Mosquitoes 'disappearing' in some parts of Africa!

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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:48 PM
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Mosquitoes 'disappearing' in some parts of Africa

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes are disappearing in some parts of Africa, but scientists are unsure as to why.

Figures indicate controls such as anti-mosquito bed nets are having a significant impact on the incidence of malaria in some sub-Saharan countries.

But in Malaria Journal, researchers say mosquitoes are also disappearing from areas with few controls.

They are uncertain if mosquitoes are being eradicated or whether they will return with renewed vigour.

Data from countries such as Tanzania, Eritrea, Rwanda, Kenya and Zambia all indicate that the incidence of malaria is dropping fast.

Researchers believe this is due to effective implementation of control programmes, especially the deployment of bed nets treated with insecticide.

But a team of Danish and Tanzanian scientists say this is not the whole story. For more than 10 years they have been collecting and counting the number of mosquitoes caught in thousands of traps in Tanzania.

In 2004 they caught over 5,000 insects. In 2009 that had dropped to just 14.

More importantly, these collections took place in villages that weren't using bed nets.

...

"What we should consider is that there may be a disease among the mosquitoes, a fungi or a virus, or they're may have been some environmental changes in the communities that have resulted in a drop in the number of mosquitoes"






Ok, I never thought I'd be saying this, but this can't be a good sign!



edit on 28-8-2011 by loam because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:51 PM
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Reply to post by loam
 


Well, the less malaria causing mosquitoes the better!

Why is this bad? It is not like bees wich are needed to spread pollen, these are mosquitoes that spread disease and nothing else!

This is god news to me, thanks.

Vvv


 
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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


They are also food for a lot of other species. I think when any species this ubiquitous goes missing, the ripple effect is likely to be huge.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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can you be more specific please? For which animal are they such a huge food source?




 
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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:56 PM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
Reply to post by loam
 


Well, the less malaria causing mosquitoes the better!

Why is this bad? It is not like bees wich are needed to spread pollen, these are mosquitoes that spread disease and nothing else!

This is god news to me, thanks.

Vvv


yeh i agree i hate those little blood suckers.....but its not just bees that spread pollen lots of different insects do,they all have their place...hmmmm so what eats mosquitoes and what are they going to eat now???

peace



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
can you be more specific please? For which animal are they such a huge food source?




 
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Water creatures like fish and other water insects. Birds and bats are a big one as well. They are eaten in all stages of their life and considering they inhabit water as well as air during their life time they are in all manners of food chains...water, land and air.

Here's a fish that really relies on the larvae: Mosquito Fish
edit on 27-8-2011 by topherman420 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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idk but this summer in missouri i dont think ive got one misquito bite at all thats very odd... dont think ive seen any either



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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I know bats, dragonflies and frogs eat mosquitoes, but surely there must be another thing that they eat? Something that doesn't bite us?



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 



Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
can you be more specific please? For which animal are they such a huge food source?


Here, I was about to post this article:




Will Franken-Mosquitos Threaten the Food Chain?

An experiment meant to curb the rise of Dengue fever is raising many questions after it was announced that 6000 genetically altered mosquitos were released into a Malaysian forrest.

...

So we have fewer mosquitos on the planet, what could possibly go wrong? After all, the Cayman Islands also did a little experiment with modified mosquitos last year and they reported an 80% reduction in the little blood suckers. Again, what could possibly be bad about a planet with fewer mosquitos?

Let’s see. . . mosquitos feed on us, but who needs mosquitos to live? Birds, dragonflies, frogs, bats, and something called the mosquito fish. Ok, so we might have a few less birds, dragonflies, frogs, bats, and mosquito fish. Some say it is small price to pay for getting rid of those pesky vampires. Can’t we live without those a few birds, frogs and fish?

Hmmm, aside from people, what eats frogs, birds and fish? Snakes, mongoose, many species of cats enjoy frogs and birds. Once you step back and look at the big picture here, the dominos all line up pretty quickly. And once they start falling, it may be too late


edit on 27-8-2011 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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No Mosquito's means no food for Bats, Birds and Insects.
That's gonna have a huge ripple effect in Nature that is going to be felt across the globe as some of the Birds that Mosquito's are migratory Birds. Not to mention the Fish that eat Mosquito eggs and larvae, in turn those Fish get eaten by other Fish, Birds and other Mammals. Which in turn get eaten by other Animals, which in turn get eaten by other Animals, which turn get eaten by Humans. You're looking at Global Wipe Out of certain Species of Animals due to the Disappearance of the Mosquito's.

Namasté



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
can you be more specific please? For which animal are they such a huge food source?




 
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Silly question.... Birds, Reptiles, other insects, Bats, to name a few.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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Malaria is a horrible disease. You could say that it's death toll in africa alone would give the aids virus a run for its money. But ofcourse it affects those of us in america as well every year. Mosquitoes are a very formidable enemy for the human race but I suppose if they are disappearing in mass amounts there could likely be a problem. But ofcourse like all things in life it is both good and bad, a double edged sword.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:00 PM
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yes, that is what i was eluding too.

I don't think mosquitoes are the staple food for these creatures, hardly their only source of food. Of course, i might be wrong, but i think i am right. Lol

Vvv


 
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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by loam
 


Since people there have a cultural predisposition to have as many children as possible, simply to make up for the losses that they will likely sustain due to malaria, I foresee even more starvation due to a continuing overpopulation and lack of education on proper farming techniques.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 



Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
I don't think mosquitoes are the staple food for these creatures, hardly their only source of food. Of course, i might be wrong, but i think i am right. Lol





The food chain would be highly impacted if mosquitoes were nonexistent.

Mosquitos even aid in the pollenation of certain plants. It’s true. The majority of adult mosquitoes meet their nutritional needs are actually met by nectar from plants. Only females bite for a blood meal, and that is only for egg-laying purposes. When the adult mosquito consumes the nectar of the plant they are as useful in the pollenation of the plant as other species of insects, such as bee’s.


Link.


edit on 27-8-2011 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
Reply to post by loam
 


Well, the less malaria causing mosquitoes the better!

Why is this bad? It is not like bees wich are needed to spread pollen, these are mosquitoes that spread disease and nothing else!

This is god news to me, thanks.

Vvv


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



Mosquitoes (and their larvae) are a very good source of food for fishes and amphibians. If all the mosquitoes dies of, so does a lot of small fishes, and if they die off, the larger fishes that preys on the small fishes dies off too, and so on ....... making sense???



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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if less people die from malaria in africa, i would be happy.

malaria truely is the biggest killer in some african nations.

i am not trying to be difficult here, i am merely saying that if malaria is eradicated, it is fantastic.

However, what will the price be?? Will it eventually lead to the same thing, death??


Time will tell.

Vvv


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by loam



Will Franken-Mosquitos Threaten the Food Chain?

An experiment meant to curb the rise of Dengue fever is raising many questions after it was announced that 6000 genetically altered mosquitos were released into a Malaysian forrest.

...

So we have fewer mosquitos on the planet, what could possibly go wrong? After all, the Cayman Islands also did a little experiment with modified mosquitos last year and they reported an 80% reduction in the little blood suckers. Again, what could possibly be bad about a planet with fewer mosquitos?

Let’s see. . . mosquitos feed on us, but who needs mosquitos to live? Birds, dragonflies, frogs, bats, and something called the mosquito fish. Ok, so we might have a few less birds, dragonflies, frogs, bats, and mosquito fish. Some say it is small price to pay for getting rid of those pesky vampires. Can’t we live without those a few birds, frogs and fish?

Hmmm, aside from people, what eats frogs, birds and fish? Snakes, mongoose, many species of cats enjoy frogs and birds. Once you step back and look at the big picture here, the dominos all line up pretty quickly. And once they start falling, it may be too late



I didn't realize this was going on at all. In addition to the article and example above, see this:




Biotech company secretly releases millions of GM mosquitoes in Cayman Islands

Scientists at British biotechnology giant Oxitec recently developed a genetically-modified (GM) mosquito that, apart from a specific chemical antibiotic, is unable to successfully repopulate. And the company recently released millions of these GM mosquitoes in the Cayman Islands to see what would happen -- and they did so without proper approval or announcement -- prompting outrage by experts and the public over the unknown consequences of conducting such an irresponsible experiment.

Oxitec released the mosquitoes last year, but only just recently let the public know about it. The company has attempted to justify its decision by claiming its GM mosquitoes may help fight the spread of dengue fever by reducing or eliminating the wild mosquito population. But nobody knows what happens when these GM mosquitoes interact with other animals and humans, or how their altered genes will disrupt the living environment.

Seemingly content with its decision to hide the trial from the public initially, Oxitec had the audacity to announce at the recent annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene that its trial was "successful". But how the company can make such a preposterous statement without knowing the long-term effects of its irreversible decision is mind-boggling.





WTF!!!

Are you freakin' kiddin' me????



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:14 PM
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Another link to the Malaysia example:

Malaysia Releases 6,000 Genetically Modified Mosquitoes into the Wild

More:

GM mosquito bred to destroy malaria

I guess this may add meaning to be careful what you wish for....

edit on 27-8-2011 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:16 PM
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this year has been the worst year for mosquitos in British Columbia (Canada) that's odd, definitely not as big a catastrophe as the missing bees case, but its still problematic for bats and fish. I also think mosquitos are a big source of food for many arachnid creatures.



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