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Exploding star can be seen from earth within 2 weeks!!

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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by ziggy1706
 


In english???
Haha

I'll have to ask him what he's got and compare it to what you've recommended. If his telescope met those requirements, what would be visible?

Thanks either way


Kyle




posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:45 AM
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Annnnnnnnnnnnnd it's cloudy....
*grumbles*



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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Thanks VVV


Anyone know what direction to look in for those of us that have no astronomy knowledge? Once Irene passes anyway :/



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
 


The light pollution where i am isnt to bad, at least compared to some cities, where you can see the light pollution form space, but i doubt ill see it. lets hope the gamma ray burst it gives off wont hit us



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:46 AM
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reply to post by Kali74
 

In the north, after sunset. It would be a bit above the last two stars of the handle of the big dipper.
But unless you know what you're looking for you're not going to see much.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks much, I know just where to look now.
This will be more of a at least I will try thing, I don't even have a telescope lol.
edit on 27-8-2011 by Kali74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Exactly, if you can find M101 and see it then you are looking at the supernova and although M101 can be hard to find at times it's relatively bright and can be seen in binoculars. Thing is at the moment the supernova is at mag 14 and even if it peaks at 10 or 9 it is still going to be not as bright as Neptune and you will need a scope to see it, most likely.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 02:16 PM
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Originally posted by Suspiria
Annnnnnnnnnnnnd it's cloudy....
*grumbles*


when aint it cloudy in stoke?
personally i think we got another 30-40 years of cloud to make up for all the potbank smoke from the pre 1970's



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by Maxatoria
 


wow this is amazing, but being in australia im not going to be able to see this.

where would be the best place to observe this? i might plan an early vacation to see such a spectular event.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 03:09 PM
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Originally posted by rayuki
reply to post by Maxatoria
 


wow this is amazing, but being in australia im not going to be able to see this.

where would be the best place to observe this? i might plan an early vacation to see such a spectular event.


lookup where has alot of those big telescopes and head there but generally i'd say hawaii and if you probably turn up to an observatory with free beer you may be able to get them to make the telescope have a malfunction so you can spend 5-10 mins viewing it while the "fix" the problem



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 03:13 PM
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At best it's going to look like a very faint star amongst lots of other stars.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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Another picture can be found HERE

EDIT:

Why not just embed it? durrrr.




There is an article though, if anyone wants more reading, in the original link


edit on 27-8-2011 by jonibelle because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-8-2011 by jonibelle because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by Essan
At best it's going to look like a very faint star amongst lots of other stars.


Is this really all we will be able to see!!
Ugh, shoulda kept that telescope anyway :/



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 03:33 PM
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You guys in the northern hemisphere should be lucky that you can witness such a rare event, no matter how small or faint it looks.

This does not happen very often.

Wish i could see it


Vvv


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by connorromanow
 


At 21 million light years away would the gamma burst still be dangerous if it was in fact pointed in our direction?
At that distance what damage could we expect?



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:35 PM
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What day is this going to be on? i always wanted to see something like this but i have to leave town because too much light.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep
You guys in the northern hemisphere should be lucky that you can witness such a rare event, no matter how small or faint it looks.

This does not happen very often.

Wish i could see it


Vvv



It happens far more than you would think.
There are nearly 40 Supernovae currently under mag 17 right now, admittedly they are hard to find without the right equipment but it is by no means a rare event.
www.rochesterastronomy.org...



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:57 PM
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Reply to post by pazcat
 


yes off course.

The thing here is though, how many of those are visible, however small, by normal people, with not too expensive equipment?

Not very many indeed.

Vvv


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 05:07 PM
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Plenty are visible in modest scopes or even bino's, but this one isn't exactly visible to everybody anyway.
Unless it surpises us most people won't see it without a telescope. Nobody will see it with the naked eye.
You're not missing out on much really.
edit on 27-8-2011 by pazcat because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 06:28 PM
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Man if we get hit by a gamma burst, whoever is on the side of the planet that gets hit are royally F***ed.



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