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Hurricane Irene 2011. History in the Making.

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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 06:10 AM
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Actually.. Hurricane Gloria took this path, or one very close to it back in 1985. I know because at the time I was 8. I am still on Long Island (NY) and we are bracing for this one as well. Even though it will be down to a Cat 1, its still going to do a ton of damage to us.

Our beaches get destroyed during a typical Nor'easter. So this storm obviously do quite a bit of damage to our shores. I'd also venture to guess the ritzy "Hamptons" will take a beating. Especially "Dune Road" which is littered with many many multi-million dollar homes.

The last time any of us on the Island had a hurricane hit us was Hurricane Bob in 1991 and that glanced us. Gloria was the last one to pass directly over us, and like I said, that was 26 years ago.

I am positioned about 30 miles east of where the eye is supposed to hit. I'll keep you all posted if anything significant occurs.




posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 06:16 AM
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reply to post by DerekJR321
 


Actually The Hamptons will not take a beating. By the time this Storm reaches NY it will be a Tropical Storm.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by MrWendal
 


The Hamptons beaches take a beating if it was a simple rain storm. I am always amazed when I drive down Dune Road that people were actually allowed to build homes on 200ft of land. The road floods out during every single rain storm.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by MrWendal
reply to post by DerekJR321
 


Actually The Hamptons will not take a beating. By the time this Storm reaches NY it will be a Tropical Storm.


You don't seem to realize, it doesn't matter if its a trop storm or hurricane, the damaging effect (FLOODING) is the same.

the Tri state is heavily soaked already with one of the wettest augusts ever, and now we're going to get another 10 inches of rain.

Pretty much 75% if not more of New Jersey is going to flood. (and my town for example already flooded 3 times this year, some of the lower ground areas even more)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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A category 2 is causing this mass panic? Only in America!



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by wavemaker
A category 2 is causing this mass panic? Only in America!


Do you even know what a Category 2 is like?

The East Coast isn't the Gulf Coast or Florida. They're used to Cat 3 or 4's down there. A Cat 2 is still a very dangerous storm.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by SlasherOfVeils

the Tri state is heavily soaked already with one of the wettest augusts ever, and now we're going to get another 10 inches of rain.

Pretty much 75% if not more of New Jersey is going to flood. (and my town for example already flooded 3 times this year, some of the lower ground areas even more)

75%?
Jesus, turn it down. There are plenty of towns in jersey that will likely flood thanks to being on the delaware basin or the actual shore line but 75% would require the storm surge to move all the way across the state; regardless of wet Augusts, New Jersey is made of marshland, pine woods and flood plain, it's made to soak up water. Less than 30% will be considered "flooded".



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by MRedfield
History as is the most over-hyped storm of the century? Absolutely.

It's a borderline Cat 1 that matches some normal Florida weather patterns now, this whole thing is a big joke.


Really....all the flooding and power outages in NC is a joke.....tell that to them.....a category 1 or 2 hurricane can still do a lot of damage.

I grow weary of all the people that say many are over-reacting.....many people have not experienced a hurricane before....to them it is scarey and important.....
edit on 27-8-2011 by caladonea because: add more



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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I love people who are so ignorant and gullible to deny that this storm is a threat the the east coast.

The category system of hurricanes is a signifier of the wind speed of the storm and nothing more. Regardless of the category number, or if it is nothing more than a tropical storm, the storm surge and the flood waters are going to affect the northeast greatly and are going to cause A LOT of damage.

Why?

Well for starters the east coast isn't really prepared for a hurricane like the southeast is.

Secondly, the northeast is saturated beyond belief and is ripe for almost instant flooding as soon as this storm reaches us.

Third, many of the major cities on the east coast rest at sea level and are located on the shores.

I could care less about the wind even though for those hit early by the storm, tornadoes can and will happen and damage will be done. The circumstances here are different and anyone who writes this off because they are used to "higher categories" are frankly just ignorant fools. No different than the fools in California who laugh at the earthquake the east coast had with no knowledge as to the difference in the grounds over here potential that such an event had.

People make me sick.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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The only thing historical about this storm is the hype around it.

The title should be;

Hurricane Irene 2011. Hysteria in the Making.

Unbeleivable. An excellent example to use for the argument to legalize weed.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by caladonea
 





I grow weary of all the people that say many are over-reacting.....many people have not experienced a hurricane before....to them it is scarey and important.....


Been through seven meself.

People ARE over-reacting.

This is probably more dangerous than the storm.

Nothing that a good smack wouldn't cure. Slow news week.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by ErEhWoN
 


Are you in the northeast?

Have you ever experienced a hurricane in the northeast?

Are you a prophet?


I am going to assume that the answer to all of those questions is a fat "NO". However, based on your response you seem to think that you "KNOW" that this storm is "nothing to worry about" and nothing but "over reaction", yet in the Carolinas they are already experiencing major flooding, wind damage, and power outages.

And guess what? The Carolinas are more prepared for hurricanes weather than any of the northeastern states are, so more than likely - it is going to get worse.

Your ignorance is disheartening. I don't watch the main stream media whatsoever and though I am not in fear of my life for this storm, I do understand the fear associated with it and I can easily sympathize with people who are doing everything they can to stay safe in this time.

You, sir, are ridiculous.
edit on 27-8-2011 by gwydionblack because: spelling.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 


Katrina sucked only because New Orleans is a freaking bowl. New York isn't in a bowl. It's flat, plus there is a much larger sewage system for the water to drain into. This isn't Katrina 2.0



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:54 AM
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Originally posted by eNumbra

Originally posted by SlasherOfVeils

the Tri state is heavily soaked already with one of the wettest augusts ever, and now we're going to get another 10 inches of rain.

Pretty much 75% if not more of New Jersey is going to flood. (and my town for example already flooded 3 times this year, some of the lower ground areas even more)

75%?
Jesus, turn it down. There are plenty of towns in jersey that will likely flood thanks to being on the delaware basin or the actual shore line but 75% would require the storm surge to move all the way across the state; regardless of wet Augusts, New Jersey is made of marshland, pine woods and flood plain, it's made to soak up water. Less than 30% will be considered "flooded".



marshland pinewood and flood plain... lets see

marshland, floods.
flood plain, its a plain, called a flood plain, BECAUSE IT FLOODS.
pinewood? Lol you have obviously only been to central/lower NJ.

entire coastal section is going to flood, my town is already 1 foot from flood levels on the rivers and its nowhere near the hurricane rainfall yet (we have approx 16 hours or so)

Yes, its being overhyped, but stop letting that blind you from the fact that NJ is not prepared for this, most of the people here are locals used to a fast moving noreaster, not a 20 hour soaker.

Personally I am moving my family into the hills in northern NJ, getting out of the area we are in (pequannock, right in the basin), because it is GOING to flood-- and our town has warned that 6 in or more of rain is going to put the entire town under water with extensive flooding. (worse then 84 where my house had 2 feet of water in the first floor--- the 2010 and floods earlier this year covered the road, didnt get close to the house though)
edit on 27-8-2011 by SlasherOfVeils because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by SlasherOfVeils
 


Best of luck to you and your family. Most of these people don't understand that the entire northeast is already close to flood levels and this thing isn't moving fast.

I can guarantee that my town is going to be completely flooded as we are only about 2 inches from flood level, and I am in central PA. It is an inevitability and I know that it is the same for most towns in the area, and will be even worse on the coast.

Luckily I'm outside town and on the hills and we never flood here so we are good to go. The others aren't going to be so lucky.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:17 PM
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Another thing to keep in mind, while this storm does not have much in the terms of wind speed, it is also a very large storm, the last i saw, the storm was approximatly 471 miles north to south and was moving at about 15 miles per hour. the city of Philadelphia (at least as of last night, not sure about now) was under a hurricane warning, which does not happen frequently. This august has also been the wettest august on record. with the ground saturated already, flooding will be of major concern. creeks and rivers in the area are going to flood. some cities have evacuated areas close to major waterways. also with the ground being saturated, it will take significantly less wind to blow them over and into buildings or onto power lines causing major outages throughout our area. local meteorologists are saying we here in Philadelphia could possibly look forward to about 20 hours of continuous rain. we've had 13 inches of rain so far this month, and can expect another 6-15 inches as well. Area Mass transit has also shut down, NJTransit, Amtrak, and SEPTA have also shut down or will be shutting down service this weekend. All of this info is coming from several local news stations, and not cnn or msnbc or whatever

the news stations have been comparing this storm to hurricane floyd back in 1999, that was pretty bad, and that struck after a major drought with streams, creeks, and other waterways at low level which also caused major flooding with 10 inches of rain, not after a wet and rainy month

yeah, sounds really blown out of proportions. should be nothing


edit on 27/8/2011 by Paladin327 because: additional info and spellchecking



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:30 PM
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Originally posted by SlasherOfVeils
marshland pinewood and flood plain... lets see

marshland, floods.
flood plain, its a plain, called a flood plain, BECAUSE IT FLOODS.
pinewood? Lol you have obviously only been to central/lower NJ.
]

Hurr a-durr, marshland floods and will absorb the storm surge from going very far inland.

Flood plains allow the banks of rivers to swell keeping them at bay from surrounding areas.

Yes jersey will get floods in the ares built specifically to flood, your 75% estimate is an insane one.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by iamhobo
 


I think you might be wrong Iamhobo:

Hurricane Gloria hit Long Island, New York on September 27th 1985 at approximately 9am

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-19c4USwM_E



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:41 PM
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It has now been downgraded to category 1 anyway, so it might be nowhere near as destructive as first though.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by redoubt
Wait till it moves into low-lying, major cities. If there is any storm surge, subways and sewers will flood, forcing millions and millions of urban rats to the surface and into taller buildings where folks are holding up.

The potential is crazy. It's the stuff of Hollywood.


my friend/co worker pointed this out. all i could think about was the sea of rats in NYC,philly, new jersey. blah such a horrific thought of droves of sewer rats flooding out.



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