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New ATS Member Claiming To Have Important Warning/Information. You Be The Judge...

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posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


And, so it's handy, here's my post,


Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by tmiddlebrook36
 


Interesting...

GESS - Global Earthquake Satellite System

And here's a recent article (published 4 months ago) on the phenomenon of "triggered creep":

Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

Westcoast, in light of your theory, I think we have ourselves quite a scenario.


I'm impressed by the way the poster words their posts. The content, itself, seems designed to inspire just enough curiosity to keep people interested, but each new post seems more and more like someone who actually works with the information they're giving us.
I've been somewhat-silently watching from the sidelines, but I'm definitely intrigued.




posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by SunnyDee
Why was this thread marked Hoax?

Has something been proven fake?

Does anyone remember reading that the big quake that is supposed to rock Cali would be centered in Valencia, Ca?

I know we had a small swarm of quakes there recently, and I downplayed it since I felt it, and it seemed like nothing unusual, but it is coming back to me that Valencia (the Newhall swarm is basically the same area-miles apart) was some scientificly predicted area that would crack Califorinia. OR I was dreaming this(don't want
to panic anybody here).
edit on 6-9-2011 by SunnyDee because: (no reason given)


I live in Newhall right over the swarm last week. We are still getting a few small ones here and there. I have a gut feeling that it was prequakes to a larger one. Hold on to yer hats!



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


Thank you for keeping us current. I don't have time right now to get into this myself, but a quick search brought up this detailed document by nasa


Okay, and the first hit brought me to this NASA JPL page that was last updated just 8/4/2011

JPL webpage

From that website:


Earthquake science is poised to capitalize on a revolutionary capability for observing global crustal deformation. The concurrent improvements in seismic monitoring networks, high-performance computing, and geodetic measurement of crustal deformation have yielded significant advances in knowledge of fault behavior and crustal stress during the past decades.




If we are to believe our poster...than I am bending more towards a NASA employee.

This gets more and more interesting....when I have more time tonight I will research this further. However, I can't help but think that this could tie into my theory even more now. my theory is based largely on the ETS (episodic tremor and Slip) array along the West Coast. It just so happened to have recently had an early episode that just ended this past week....started about the time our poster appeared. Related????

info on ETS



In 2001, CWU researchers with the continuous GPS network Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array discovered periodic slow-slip across the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Previously undetected by seismic networks, these slip events exhibit regular recurrence intervals thus changing current understanding of earthquake behavior. Since this time, definitions for this newly discovered phenomenon have evolved. At first, the term "silent-earthquake" was employed to illustrate the absence of a seismic signature. Subsequent investigations and recent discoveries have led to a change in characterization. Now these slow-slip events are defined as eposodic tremor and slip (ETS).



Please see my thread titled putting it all together if you are interested. It is in my sig.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


tmiddlebrook's post seem to be
serious. Using words such as
imminent, holy grail, etc. However I
am not familiar with the organization
he/she speaks of. Does anyone know
what it stands for and what they do -
is this the organization located in
Pasadena, Ca? To be imminent means
no question about it and right at the
doorstep. I find myself hoping this
is a hoax.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


And, so it's handy, here's my post,


Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by tmiddlebrook36
 


Interesting...

GESS - Global Earthquake Satellite System

And here's a recent article (published 4 months ago) on the phenomenon of "triggered creep":

Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes

Westcoast, in light of your theory, I think we have ourselves quite a scenario.


I'm impressed by the way the poster words their posts. The content, itself, seems designed to inspire just enough curiosity to keep people interested, but each new post seems more and more like someone who actually works with the information they're giving us.
I've been somewhat-silently watching from the sidelines, but I'm definitely intrigued.



Ha...we were posting at the same time. great minds and all that...


Yes, we are thinking the same thing. Which ofcourse is going to make me even more curious, as I have already formed my own opinions of an event in California based on things tie quite nicely into what this poster is saying.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


Thank you for answering the questions
I had in my post. You must have been
posting at the same time I was.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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Originally posted by westcoast

Yes, we are thinking the same thing. Which ofcourse is going to make me even more curious, as I have already formed my own opinions of an event in California based on things tie quite nicely into what this poster is saying.


In this case, I bet you hate the increasing possibility of being right.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 06:50 PM
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Ok lets just say there was to be a large one in Newhall at least 7.0, Would those closer or farther away from the epicenter experience more damage?

Reason I'm asking is when we had our 4.2 last week right underneath us, it felt HUGE. I felt every single after shock after too, including the 1.5-2.0. People said it wasn't possible and I said, "YOU'RE not sitting right on top the damn fault"!!!!!



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime

Originally posted by westcoast

Yes, we are thinking the same thing. Which ofcourse is going to make me even more curious, as I have already formed my own opinions of an event in California based on things tie quite nicely into what this poster is saying.


In this case, I bet you hate the increasing possibility of being right.


Oh man, you have no idea.

You see...we have to take into consideration what tectonics are at work here and what else may be involved. If we are to believe them and acknowledge a possibility of a 7.0 mag quake in the LA area, we know that a major fault has to be involved. Most would assume the San Andreas. If you look at a fault of California though, you'll see that the San Andreas is to the west of the most recent swarm near LA. LA itself is west of the san andreas....BUT, if we apply this to the assumption that it is being predicted due to a slow processin or deformation, i think it safe to assume that we are talking about a lot more. Not just the San Andreas....but a further fracturing of the the North American Plate, and perhaps even the subduction zone that I theorize about.

Think about it...ties into the whole GESS thing.



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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I too am intrigued with some of the phrasing TMiddlebrook used....in particular the phrase "on the doorsteps of Southern California" because I found this in an article about the southernmost portion of the San Andreas Fault:


There is some aseismic creep documented in parts of this segment. At its south end, the motion between the Pacific and North American plates shifts to a stairstep series of spreading centers and faults that runs down the Gulf of California. The southern segment has not ruptured since some time before 1700, and it is widely considered "overdue" for an earthquake of approximately magnitude 8.


I may be getting too nit-picky

Link: geology.about.com...



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


I read the article you posted about triggered creeping....do I understand correctly that this effect is not confined to the fault line where the original quake took place....like a big quake somewhere else :
As TMiddlebrook said



The findings are linked to recent major events (over long distances) and current conditions.


or would the triggered event stay on the same fault line? I really can't tell by the way it is phrased in the article




The passage of radiating seismic waves generates transient stresses in the Earth’s crust that can trigger slip on faults far away from the original earthquake source


Interesting article by the way but I had to read it several times and I'm still not clear if it means a different fault or within the same one.

link www.nature.com...



posted on Sep, 8 2011 @ 11:42 PM
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Some info to pour over for those with time.
May help,may not.
It is dated August 24,2011


CRS Report for Congress



Earthquakes: Risk, Detection, Warning, and Research



Summary The United States faces the possibility of large economic losses from earthquake-damaged buildings and infrastructure. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has estimated that earthquakes cost the United States, on average, over $5 billion per year. California, Oregon, and Washington account for nearly $4.1 billion (77%) of the U.S. total estimated average annualized loss. California alone accounts for most of the estimated annualized earthquake losses for the nation.



According to a report released on April 14, 2008, California has a 99% chance of experiencing a magnitude 6.7 or larger earthquake in the next 30 years. 6 The likelihood of an even larger earthquake, magnitude 7.5 or greater, is 46%, and such an earthquake would likely occur in the southern part of the state. The fault with the highest probability of generating at least one earthquake of magnitude 6.7 or greater over the next 30 years is the San Andreas in southern California (59% probability); for northern California it is the Hayward-Rodgers Creek fault (31%). The earthquake forecasts are not predictions (i.e., they do not give a specific date or time), but represent probabilities over a given time period. In addition, the probabilities have variability associated with them. The earthquake forecasts are known as the “Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF)” and are produced by a working group composed of the USGS, the California Geological Survey, and the Southern California Earthquake Center.


www.fas.org...

From this source.
www.fas.org...


edit on 8-9-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-9-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-9-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-9-2011 by kdog1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by megabogie
 


It would seem they're speaking of an earthquake at one fault triggering an earthquake at another fault. In fact, they seem to be coming to the same conclusions we came to after watching the Japan earthquake - that earthquakes in one area can trigger earthquakes in another. We saw it happen in real-time, and this appears to be a study of such events.

It's also important to note the phrase "transient stress". It further confirms that what we are seeing is not the caused by permanent crustal displacement - that is, in this case, one earthquake is not shifting the plate and, thus, putting pressure on a fault on the other side of the plate. The source of the triggered earthquake is, in fact, a result of the travelling seismic waves putting a single pulse of stress on a distant fault.

We saw it here in March, and they've been studying it for a while.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 10:46 AM
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Slightly off-topic here, but my cat is freaking out right now. He is running over all the furniture, stopping abruptly, panting like a dog, and then taking off again.

He is playful, but this is excessive. Thought I'd post this since they say animals might be able to sense earthquakes. Dogs seem fine though.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 

Panting for cats is not good. Try a cool
wash rag over him, he may be overheated.
Is it hot there? Hope he gets better soon.

Is he drinking water?

Sounds like he is upset over something.

edit on 9-9-2011 by crazydaisy because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:11 AM
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Digging, digging, finding...


MENLO PARK, Calif. — Researchers examining the San Andreas Fault in central California have found evidence that distant earthquakes can trigger episodes of accelerated (but still very slow) slip motion, deep on the fault.

While a sudden slip on a fault generates earthquakes capable of strong shaking, a fault can also slip slowly. Sometimes, these slow movements on a fault, known as creep events, are accompanied by a weak ground vibration known as a tectonic tremor, which can be detected on sensitive seismometers.


And further:


The researchers also noted that creep events in other locations can sometimes trigger earthquakes. While they caution that their study was focused on triggered tremor rather than triggered earthquakes, they suggest that prolonged triggered creep episodes could be relevant for both phenomena. In particular, triggered creep episodes could provide a physical explanation for the time delay commonly observed between passing seismic waves and distantly generated earthquakes.
emphasis mine

I wonder if this is what tmiddlebrook is referring to?


Published online this week in the journal, “Nature Geoscience,” the study, “Triggered creep as a possible mechanism for delayed dynamic triggering of tremor and earthquakes,” is the latest of ongoing research on the effects of large earthquakes on distant faults. While distantly triggered small earthquakes are relatively common, another recent study found no evidence for distantly triggered large earthquakes, at least during the first few days after a large event. The current study provides a possible mechanism to explain a range of time delays between a large distant event and triggered earthquakes.


This is the study CLPrime linked. Interesting, very interesting.

Looking at that particular study, we see the following:


Nature Geoscience 4, 384–388 (2011) doi:10.1038/ngeo1141
Received 08 October 2010 Accepted 28 March 2011 Published online 08 May 2011


It takes upwards of five months for a study to be reviewed, then a further two months for publishing. This being the case, the information tmiddlebrook seems to be privy to is contained within a study still under review and not yet published as is indicated by their phrasing:


I stress, timing is everything, and thus why there is no current public data. New information if pouring in daily, however we're moving in the wrong direction.


Apparently, the Department of Homeland Security is also interested in this:


In late July, forty-four earthquake experts met at the University of Southern California’s Earthquake Center for two days to discuss forecasting methods.

“I was pretty skeptical going in and I remain skeptical,” said John Vidale, a professor of seismology at the University of Washington, who was among the forty-four experts from around the world invited to attend the meeting.

“I’ve been chasing this for a long time,” said Malcolm Johnston, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, echoing Vidale’s sentiments. “If you think you can detect the start of an earthquake, it’s going to be very, very difficult.”

In contrast, researchers who are more optimistic about prediction techniques are exploring various theories that they believe can detect in advance when an earthquake will strike.

For instance, Dimitar Ouzounov, a physicist at Chapman University and a seismologist by training, is using satellite data to discern how changes in the atmosphere might relate to earthquakes. Meanwhile, Friedemann Freund, a researcher with NASA is investigating electric signals from rocks being squeezed.


This echos one of the earlier posts but has a bit more detail.

Let's look further, shall we?



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


He's calmed down now, but still pretty weird. He just plopped down in the middle of the kitchen floor and went to sleep. Seems ok. He is a siamese, so I have to take that into consideration! If he keeps acting weird today, I will mention it.



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:42 AM
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I know this is a small one, but I want to point out that is it's location is about 30 miles SW of Middlebrook Hts.

Magnitude 1.6 - EASTERN TENNESSEE
2011 September 09 12:04:59 UTC

Details
Maps

Earthquake Details

This event has been reviewed by a seismologist.

Magnitude 1.6
Date-Time

Friday, September 09, 2011 at 12:04:59 UTC
Friday, September 09, 2011 at 08:04:59 AM at epicenter

Location 35.659°N, 84.373°W
Depth 11.9 km (7.4 miles)
Region EASTERN TENNESSEE
Distances

3 km (2 miles) SE (129°) from Philadelphia, TN
9 km (5 miles) SSW (194°) from Loudon, TN
11 km (7 miles) NE (54°) from Sweetwater, TN
37 km (23 miles) SSW (192°) from Oak Ridge, TN
52 km (32 miles) SW (228°) from Knoxville, TN
211 km (131 miles) N (1°) from Atlanta, GA

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 1 km (0.6 miles); depth +/- 3.6 km (2.2 miles)
Parameters NST= 7, Nph= 13, Dmin=16 km, Rmss=0.02 sec, Gp=108°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=A
Source

Southeast U.S. Seismic Network

Event ID se090911a



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by Cherryontop
 


Has anyone here been looking for any connection between New Madrid quakes and California quakes? Given the "creep" info, are we to look at one and see a correlation with the other?
I haven't been following these tremors nearly as much as many of you have, though I do know Robin said there was a connection between New Madrid and the Virginia quake.
Is New Madrid triggering California quakes? Or are quakes in California triggering New Madrid?
Or both?



posted on Sep, 9 2011 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by CLPrime
 


In Westcoasts www.abovetopsecret.com... Putting it all Together thread, her first post shows how she thinks they are all interconnected.

What I find confusing is that Tmiddlebrook is clearly warning of a westcoast event, but their screen name and posting habits reflect some interest in NMZ. And, since the above mentioned poster doesn't seem to want to engage and or answer any question no matter how vague, I don't know what, if any correlation they have.
edit on 9-9-2011 by Cherryontop because: spelling



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