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Have any of our "stars" ever gone out or disappeared?

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posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:43 PM
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I pose this question as I have thought of it frequently in my pondering of philosophy and the origins of mankind. Since the earliest records of man watching the skies there has always been a set of stars, constellations, and celestial bodies that make up the night skies. Yet we are told by scientists that constantly these bodies are morphing, exploding, caving in upon themselves and a number of other things that we have apparently monitored.

However, why is it that in all of the known human existence not a single one of the constellations has changed? Why is it all the same today as it has been thousands of years ago?

Surely, with the sheer amount of bodies visible in our night sky, the probability that at least one things would have greatly changed in the past few millennia should be staggering. Yet it doesn't seem like anything has.

Am I wrong?

If I am right, how can this be explained?
edit on 26-8-2011 by gwydionblack because: spelling




posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


Stars can live for a several million, or in upwards of billions of years. The cooler, smaller ones, tens of billions.

Humanity has kept star records (constellations) for what... 4000 years? And not very detailed ones until very recent decades.

An example: our sun should live for something like ten billion years. Humanity has been observing and recording stars for one 2.5 MILLIONTH of our suns life. It would be much more startling if there in fact WERE drastic changes in the night sky, rather than a lack of them.
edit on 8/26/2011 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


Most of the stars we see are relatively young, so there is very little chance of any of them having "died" in the time we've been watching them
We've also only been watching them for a short time (a few thousand years really isn't that long), so that knocks the probability down even further.

We have been around for the death of a number of stars, though. Most of those just aren't all that noticeable (or aren't noticeable at all) with the naked eye, or to anyone other than a very careful observer.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:51 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


Stars are being born, and stars die all the time. I am taking the easy way out, but just wiki it. Every part of us (well, anything heavier than hydrogen that is), comes from a star that exploded a long, long time ago....

en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


Well, I'd have to say yes to that GW. I'm by no means any kind of expert, but, even the "north star" has changed over the eons as both the angle of tilt of the Earth, and the location of the stars themselves change with time. But, we're talking LONG time.

Just as a for instance though, the super nova in 1044AD (or around there) was seen by Tycho Bahae and this was visable during the day time. It was a "star" before in went super nova, so in essance, it was there, exploded, and is now just a diffused nebula with only a very small remnant of it's former self.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 02:56 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


M42, better know as the Orion Nebula, is a faint object south of Orion's belt. If you know where to look, you can easily see it in the coutryside with your bare eyes, and stars are being created there as we speak.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:00 PM
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The stars have moved their respective positions through the millenniums. It is I thought the whole basis of the Mayan long calendar, the origin of the Egyptian Sphinx, and many more ancient beliefs. There are countless beliefs on a myriad of subjects based on star alignments in the next 10,000 years and the past 10,000 years. I believe Wiki has a list called something like the 11,000th century.

Here's a link to where the stars may be 10,000 years from now.

But if you are saying no noticeable star has vanished, probably not. Most stars would visibly get brighter before they fade, or supernova. There has just yesterday been discovered a new supernova, just formed hours before being discovered, a thread in this forum. It is not visible to the naked eye though. In the 80's a supernova was mistaken for planet X, and during the cold war another flash in the sky almost started a nuclear war, setting off sensors, but it was another supernova, I believe. I'm just thinking from memory.

Outside of supernovas, things change really slowly.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:18 PM
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If a star dies and is 1000 light years away it will take 1000 years before we stop seeing the star in the sky as that is how long it takes the light to reach earth. Some stars in the sky probably don't exist anymore but we still see the light from them because its still travelling through space.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


In 2005 when I was in Basic training at Fort Sill, OK in the army, I was at morning PT running and it was dark outside to where I could see many stars. I don't know which direction of the sky I was facing but I literally saw a supernova with my naked eye. I watched this star grow from a dust size spec to the size of a dime then almost instantaneously disappear from existence. It was an amazing sight to be able to see something like that without equipment.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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Stars have indeed been seen to die (super nova). We also observe the birth of stars in nebuli and the burst of energy associated with the critical mass ignition of young stars has been observed as well.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 04:01 PM
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The closest star to us that is the most likely candidate for a supernova any time soon is Betelgeuse (pronounced beetlejuice). It is thought to be about 600 light years away, and is a red supergiant. Anytime soon on a cosmic scale is from within the next 10 minutes to the next 1,000,000 years. When it does supernova, it will be visible from earth during the day, and at night it will be as bright as a full moon.

According to the European Space Agency, there is a supernova occurring once every fifty years on average in the Milky Way.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 04:05 PM
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Google: Black hole eats star for interesting video.
sorry, for some reason having trouble embedding video. (most likely my fault)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


I believe that Charlie Sheen is no longer shinning nor is he winning as much as he had hoped.





...sorry, I just had too.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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The crab nebula is the remenence of an even witnessed by some dark age monks. Arab and Chinese texts also include a couple of events that can only be a dying star.

Also...

Next to Betelgeuze, which is about to pop, there is a star in the carina nebula, which is relative close to Sol ( our sun ) called Eta Carina. The star is supposed to have a mass 100 times that of the Sun and it's shining so bright and burns its fuel so fast ... it's about to pop any day now.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:08 PM
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Originally posted by JLO1986
In 2005 when I was in Basic training at Fort Sill, OK in the army, I was at morning PT running and it was dark outside to where I could see many stars. I don't know which direction of the sky I was facing but I literally saw a supernova with my naked eye.
That was most likely an iridium flare, not a supernova:



If it was a supernova astronomers would have documented it, and they are visible for longer than that. The 1054 supernova was visible for 2 years:

Mystery of the 1054 Supernova
www.suite101.com...

In this week's blog, we discussed how the 1054 Supernova was recorded by Japanese, Chinese and Native American astronomers-but not, apparently, by Europeans. Why?

One theory is that bad weather prevented any observations in Europe. However, the supernova was visible for two years



Originally posted by ctdannyd
Just as a for instance though, the super nova in 1044AD (or around there) was seen by Tycho Bahae and this was visable during the day time. It was a "star" before in went super nova, so in essance, it was there, exploded, and is now just a diffused nebula with only a very small remnant of it's former self.
I think you were in the ballpark with the date, though I never heard any name like that associated with the 1054 supernova.


Originally posted by gwydionblack
Surely, with the sheer amount of bodies visible in our night sky, the probability that at least one things would have greatly changed in the past few millennia should be staggering. Yet it doesn't seem like anything has.

Am I wrong?

If I am right, how can this be explained?
You're right and wrong. You're right that there have been changes. You're wrong in theinking that they'd be dramatic in only a few thousand years, with the exception of events like the 1054 supernova which was dramatic enough to be recorded by some astronomers but not others.

Here's an experiment you can try, you can install Stellarium and put in different dates and see how much the sky changes. Unless you're making precise measurements, the changes over an astronomically relatively short period of time like 1000 years, are subtle. Even in 50,000 years, the changes in the night sky seen from Earth won't be that dramatic.




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